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A potato

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It's true. But of course the units doing parades are probably not the same as combat units.

Real combat is much different than stimulated combat. But again, I doubt infantry combat is relevant to a US China conflict. The experience US has is very important and a big advantage but it doesn't mean Chinese units can't fight well either.

I think China needs to focus on making training more realistic. The recent addition of the colored smoke helmets to signal kills is a step in the wrong direction. They don't seem to use systems like MILES.

Also people from top of the chain to the bottom need to be tested in leadership and improvisation. Rote training is only 25% of a skill set. The US does this training really well.

I think China realizes these issues but is probably more focused on training naval and air units. I'm not familiar with training in that realm but it's not like the US has had experience in these fields either other than bombing hadjis.
I agreed but at same time US combat experience doesn't count since it's not even impressive. It's usually the might of NATO vs a small country.
 

el pueblo unido

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Are there any threads related to the PAP, Chinese SWAT, or chinese SOF? I've found a multitude of content on Bilibili and youtube where seemingly Chinese police and the like use equipment i'd be interested in learning more about (or are these all just airsoft LARPers?).

e.g. below:
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thank you in advance!
The guy in the video is 喻强墙 retired former PAP officer, he served in XinJiang and now a private instructor that provides training for PLA and PAP units
 

el pueblo unido

New Member
Registered Member
It's true. But of course the units doing parades are probably not the same as combat units.

Real combat is much different than stimulated combat. But again, I doubt infantry combat is relevant to a US China conflict. The experience US has is very important and a big advantage but it doesn't mean Chinese units can't fight well either.

I think China needs to focus on making training more realistic. The recent addition of the colored smoke helmets to signal kills is a step in the wrong direction. They don't seem to use systems like MILES.

Also people from top of the chain to the bottom need to be tested in leadership and improvisation. Rote training is only 25% of a skill set. The US does this training really well.

I think China realizes these issues but is probably more focused on training naval and air units. I'm not familiar with training in that realm but it's not like the US has had experience in these fields either other than bombing hadjis.
How do you think about the training shown in this video ?
 

gongolongo

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How do you think about the training shown in this video ?
Just FYI, I'm not some super expert. I'm just was an 11A infantry officer.

These are CQC training. Training that I haven't seen China display are the more open ended exercises like STX lanes. Basically an entire company gets a briefing with limited intel and executes a mission. There's an opfor, comprised of another company. Sometimes it's combined arms. Once you're in the field, you're on your own for the next several hours or days. Only 5% of the mission is actually fighting and the rest is a test of leadership, organization and large amounts of improvisation. That's the reality of war.

Problem solving and improvisation to complete the objective is more important than any skill in war.
 

zxy_bc

Junior Member
Registered Member
Just FYI, I'm not some super expert. I'm just was an 11A infantry officer.

These are CQC training. Training that I haven't seen China display are the more open ended exercises like STX lanes. Basically an entire company gets a briefing with limited intel and executes a mission. There's an opfor, comprised of another company. Sometimes it's combined arms. Once you're in the field, you're on your own for the next several hours or days. Only 5% of the mission is actually fighting and the rest is a test of leadership, organization and large amounts of improvisation. That's the reality of war.

Problem solving and improvisation to complete the objective is more important than any skill in war.
What you are talking about is not company-based exercise in China, but Combined-battalion level exercises within a Combined-brigade. (PLA Company-level exercises are more specialized to their company’s dedicated roles and execution. Battalion now serves as the most basic operational unit that could conduct independent combined ops in the battlefield with its own supporting arms)
 

gongolongo

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What you are talking about is not company-based exercise in China, but Combined-battalion level exercises within a Combined-brigade. (PLA Company-level exercises are more specialized to their company’s dedicated roles and execution. Battalion now serves as the most basic operational unit that could conduct independent combined ops in the battlefield with its own supporting arms)
Yes large battlegroups are all the same. My point is being able to look at a unique problem and solve as a unit is incredibly important. Leadership needs to be constantly made uncomfortable and learn to improv.
 

zxy_bc

Junior Member
Registered Member
Yes large battlegroups are all the same. My point is being able to look at a unique problem and solve as a unit is incredibly important. Leadership needs to be constantly made uncomfortable and learn to improv.
Well to be fair PLA has a pretty different combat philosophy than the conventional western force. The concept of “military democratic leadership” still runs its course when it comes to independent operation for operational groups. (Typically the basic battalion unit’s CO, commissar, deputy commanders and chief of staff act as the decision-making circle of the unit, while the final consensus is confirmed by the CO) The commissar is extremely important in PLA military as he not only is responsible for justifying the unit’s targets political importance and magnifying such strategic message to the entire unit, not just NCOs but everyone during the pre-deployment mobilization conference (Meaning if the units is unfortunately forced to scatter and unable to regroup directly, independent combat teams would conduct separate operations to achieve the aforementioned strategic objective emphasized by the commissar right before initial deployment) Right now for PLAGF they are not lacking per-say problem-solving techniques in under-supported situation, (since they had been actually under-supported for almost 20 years, rendering them developing many weird asymmetric capabilities) but more how to achieve objectives while maximizing their support arms. (They are more or less underused by COs cause they are not used to the idea of able to call in CAS on enemy position anytime OR requesting ELINT OR even call in Army Aviation when necessary)
 

lcloo

Senior Member
A mysterious rusty tank found floating off Natuna island in South China Sea. Some said it belong to an Indonesian oil company.

So what is it?

Mysterious-‘tank-spotted-floating-at-sea-PHOTOS-—-Analysis-780x405.jpg
 
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