US Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


OvidiuB

Just Hatched
Registered Member
Dear all, this is my first post.

I've been following SDF for a few years.
I've learned a lot from your contributions to this forum.
It took long to find a reliable venue with such a variety of topics!

I am interested in Mathematics, Religion, Education, SDF and many other things.

Wishing you all the best,
Ovidiu

Just notice the quad-packing of Block 2 ESSM at 1:18!
 
Dear all, this is my first post.

I've been following SDF for a few years.
I've learned a lot from your contributions to this forum.
It took long to find a reliable venue with such a variety of topics!

I am interested in Mathematics, Religion, Education, SDF and many other things.

Wishing you all the best,
Ovidiu

Just notice the quad-packing of Block 2 ESSM at 1:18!
you have the right to remain silent, but in case you post something, any and all parts of your post may and will be used against you on the board; do you understand this?

LOL just kidding
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
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Requirements match capability set3 laid out by the Army FVL with the ability to perform the same mission sets as the Viper and Venom. Cruising between 230kt and 310kt.
Internal payload of between 3000lb and 4000lb external of 6000 to 8000 but with the ability to fold for naval ship hosting minimum combat radius of 450 Nautical miles 30 minute loiter on station. Which matches the V22.
Comparing the SB-1 And V280 to the requirements they seem to favor the Bell V280.
 
since I've now read it, I post Pave Hawk Replacement Can't Come Too Soon as Maintenance Mounts: GAO
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The U.S.
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's aging combat search-and-rescue helicopter fleet is experiencing a surge in maintenance challenges, leaving fewer available for training and combat environments, according to a new report.

The Government Accountability Office on Thursday said the Sikorsky-made
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, the service's primary search-and-rescue platform, has seen an increased maintenance rate because the Air Force is flying the helicopter well beyond its intended service life.

"The material condition of the Air Force's HH-60G fleet has declined and maintenance challenges have increased, in part due to extensions beyond the initially designed service life of the helicopters," the report said. As a result, about "68 percent of the 96-helicopter fleet were mission-capable as of fiscal year 2017, below the Air Force desired mission-capable rate of 75 percent."

The 1980s-era HH-60G was intended to fly roughly 6,000 hours over its lifetime. The available helicopters across the fleet currently "average about 7,100 flight hours," according to the report.

Airframes -- the main structure of the aircraft; turboshaft engines; and flight controls are elements that fail most often, the GAO said.

Maintenance time has increased to an average "of more than 25 maintenance man-hours for every flight hour" in fiscal 2017 compared to 21 hours in fiscal 2013. The service also has seen a 40 percent increase in the average time required to conduct more extensive depot-level maintenance, from 233 days in 2007 to 332 days in 2017, the report said.

The helos have been invaluable in operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and even the U.S. for relief efforts such as Hurricane Katrina. The Pave Hawk has a retractable in-flight refueling probe and internal auxiliary fuel tanks that allow for better range and loiter time during rescue missions.

Flight hours have increased over the years due to a higher operations tempo. For example, the Pave Hawk is frequently used in combat ops in the Middle East, where it is often battered by dust storms.

"My concern is, we're already flying an aircraft that's beyond its normal lifespan, and for helicopters it's a lot different than fixed-wing," Col. Kurt Matthews, commander of the 920th Rescue Wing, told Military.com in February.

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on Feb. 20 at
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, Florida, used for the combat search-and-rescue mission and spoke with officials about the 920th's evolving operations. The 920th is the only Air Force Reserve rescue wing and is responsible for 18 percent of all the service's rescue missions.

At that time, one of the unit's Pave Hawks had been down for maintenance for eight days because of a corroded wire inside of a cannon plug "somewhere in the aircraft, causing an anomaly in the airplane," said Senior Master Sgt. Dean Peterson, the 920th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron superintendent.

The Air Force plans to replace its aging HH-60Gs in two ways: First, by buying 21
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and converting them into the HH-60G Pave Hawk configuration under its Operational Loss Replacement program; and second, by purchasing 112 new Combat Recovery Helicopters, known as the HH-60W, to replace the current Pave Hawk fleet, the report said.

The reconfigured UH-60Ls will be fielded first to active-duty units, six years before they're anticipated to be delivered to the Reserve component. The last of the Sikorsky HH-60Ws -- based on the
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-- are scheduled to be fielded to the active, Guard and Reserve components by fiscal 2029.

Officials from the 920th said they anticipate receiving their first "Whiskey" model in eight to 10 years.

The Air Force until then will continue performing maintenance as necessary, the report said. The GAO had no recommendations, adding that it had requested input from the Defense Department, but none was provided.

The service currently has 82 HH-60G helicopters "designated to meet its personnel recovery mission requirements," the GAO said. The remaining 14 Pave Hawks are designated "for training and, development and testing."
a whole day (24 hours) of maintenance to fly a helo for one hour ... after Thursday at 7:59 PM how it's for an Osprey LOL
 
Jul 17, 2018
Apr 14, 2016
now
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source:
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while L3, Northrop Selected for Next Generation Jammer Work; Program Stalled After Raytheon Protest
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The next phase of the Navy’s effort to replace its decades-old ALQ-99 jamming systems on its fleet of electronic warfare aircraft is in a holding pattern amid a protest from a company cut from the competition, USNI News has learned.

As part of rapid acquisition push for the new jamming technology, the Navy is splitting up the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) ALQ-99 replacement work into three increments based on the frequencies the system must block – high-band, mid-band and low-band – to help shield U.S. aircraft from anti-air radar systems.

In 2013, Raytheon won a $276 million award for the first portion of the NGJ project – the ALQ-249 mid-band jamming part of the new system – and was awarded an additional $1.2 billion for the work in 2016.

In late 2017, Naval Air Systems Command announced a “demonstration of existing technology” contract to shape how it would pursue the low-band increment. The work would create “[a] demonstration that will lead to an assessment of the maturity level of the technologies that might be applied to a low band jammer pod,” a NAVAIR spokesperson told USNI News in a statement on Tuesday. “This will help inform the appropriate acquisition strategy of the program.”

Last month, L3 and a team of Northrop Grumman and Harris were selected to move forward from a field of four competitors that also included Raytheon and a Lockheed Martin and Cobham team, USNI News has learned. Soon afterwards,
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, arguing it should have been selected to move forward with the low-band jammer effort.

Both L3 and the Northrop Grumman/Harris team confirmed that their low-band tech was selected for potential further study by NAVIAR but referred additional questions to the Navy due to the ongoing protest from Raytheon.

“We have a mature and exceedingly capable offering for Next-Generation Jammer Low Band,” a Northrop spokesman told USNI News in a statement. “Northrop Grumman stands ready to demonstrate that technology.”

USNI News understands a Lockheed Martin/Cobham team was not selected for further study. A Lockheed spokesperson referred questions to the Navy citing the protest.

In a short statement, Raytheon implied the Navy did not fully take into account the benefits of the company’s existing investment into the ALQ-249 mid-band jamming technology.

“We believe there were errors in the government’s evaluation,” Dana Carroll, a Raytheon spokeswoman, told USNI News in a statement. “Our low-risk, open architecture pod effectively and affordably counters modern threats while maximizing reuse of proven technology and taxpayer investment.”

The GAO has until October to reach a decision on Raytheon protest.

The
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after the service shrugged off developing an improved capability for years in favor of other priorities. The program was placed on the backburner for years while the U.S. was mostly engaged in conflicts with largely uncontested airspace.

However, with the national defense focus of “great power competition,” along with accelerated capabilities in both Chinese and Russian radar systems and anti-air warfare systems, the NGJ capability was given new importance and was placed on a list of accelerated acquisition programs that was overseen by former Pentagon acquisition chief Frank Kendall. That emphasis to improve the electronic warfare capability has carried over into the current administration.

Last month, Capt. Michael Orr told reporters at the Farnborough Airshow that early iterations of the system would begin aerial testing next year and the entire system was set to reach an initial operational capability sometime in 2022,
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.

The gradual introduction of the NGJ systems onto U.S. and Australian Boeing EA-18G Growlers will initially augment the ALQ-99 before eventually replacing the legacy capability, according to NAVAIR.
 

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