Type 093/094 Nuclear Submarine Thread


Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
It doesn't make much sense to limit JL-3's range because of some requirement to keep it of same dimensions.
Trident missiles are bigger than JL-2. And one could argue that USN can also place their subs closer to both russia and china. Chinese subs can't really go out of SCS/ECS, so the missiles have to cross a greater distance on average.

The benefit of being able to use 094 subs for such JL3 is, in my opinion, not worth the sacrifice in range and payload. IF indeed JL3 is made to fit into 094.

I do think it's possible there's simply a next gen JL2, of same dimensions, but with newer tech, stemming from the JL3 development. And that's the one people are sometimes erroneously labeling as JL3. And that JL3, larger, will come in the future.
 

Equation

Lieutenant General
How come JL-3 and JL-2 have the same size and differ in range greatly 7,200 kms vs 11,900 kms ? what advancements in JL-3?
Lighter and stronger materials along with miniaturization of other electronics and parts that can reduce the total weight greatly without compromising the robustness of the ICBM.
 

Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
Interesting seem like China's nuclear submarine bases are all underground tunnel. In WWII the allied bomb out the Krieg Marine sub bases and none of them are destroyed.
I think we already know that China has commissioned 4 Jin class sub and 2 are outfitting. so there is no surprise if they now commission the 2 newly built sub. the image below is from Feb 2019 when they are outfitting the sub
The SSBN Fleet
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
China currently operates four Jin-class (Type 094) SSBNs (nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines) with two more fitting out. The four operational SSBNs are all based at the Longpo Naval Base on Hainan Island. The information about the fifth and sixth hulls is new and expands
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
. Once completed, this force will be capable of carrying up to 72 JL-2 SLBMs with as many warheads, 24 more than the four operational can currently carry.
1588714926836.png
China is increasing its ballistic missile submarine fleet. Click on image to view full size.
The Pentagon report says the four operational SSBNs “represent China’s first credible, sea-based nuclear deterrent,” although the report doesn’t say if the submarines are armed with missiles under normal circumstances, if the warheads for those missiles are installed, or if the submarines sail on deterrent patrols.

The six Jin-class SSBNs will be followed by a next-generation SSBN known as Type 096, which DOD projects might begin construction in the early-2020s. The new SSBN class will carry the follow-on JL-3 SLBM but China will probably operate the two types concurrently.


Chinese Navy Submarines Are Protected By Underground Tunnels
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
Contributor
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

I cover the changing world of underwater warfare.
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
1588713869078.png

The Chinese Navy has a number of underground[+]
H I SUTTON
China is a maritime nation with over 9,000 miles of coastline, dotted with ports. Compared to most other countries, it has a large number of naval bases. By dispersing its forces across many bases the Chinese Navy, formally known as the PLAN (People’s Liberation Army Navy), is protecting them against surprise attack. But some of it bases go further, offering underground tunnels to protect key warships and submarines.

In the age of precision strike cruise missiles and bunker buster bombs, tunnels may seem an outdated idea. But they still provide cover against some air attack and, perhaps more importantly, prying eyes. And they can also protect against nuclear attack, provided it is not a direct hit.

China’s tend to be built directly into rocky outcrops which may provide many feet of overhead protection. The entrance is usually facing inland (but with water access) so that it is harder to hit from offshore.
The best known of these tunnels are two which protect the strategic submarine force. One built at
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
(36° 6’20.76″N, 120°35’2.39″E) near Qingdao provides a hiding place for ballistic missile submarines based there.

And more recently one has been built at Yulin (18°12’8.97″N, 109°41’39.34″E). This is where a
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
around 12 years ago. Yulin allows Chinese submarines (and aircraft carriers) easy access to the South China Sea, an important operating area.
Some other PLAN bases also have tunnels which are less well known. The submarine base on Xiachuan Dao has a small tunnel just inside the harbor wall (21°35’45.08″N, 112°33’5.14″E). And a shipyard where large warships and submarines are repaired, near the submarine base at Xiangshan, also has a tunnel (29°31’41.09″N, 121°41’16.98″E).

There are other tunnels which are physically removed from any naval bases. These may provide more dispersed protection, although it is also possible that some are not Navy related. For example there is quite a large tunnel in a mountain on an island south of Shipuzhen (29°11’2.75″N, 121°56’35.68″E). There is a missile boat squadron nearby, but the tunnel appears separate from any PLAN naval base. Other less obvious tunnels include some near Daishan (30°15’40.61″N, 122°19’1.43″E), and along the coast from of Yalin (18°15’42.67″N, 109°43’41.13″E).

China’s tunnels are an interesting difference from U.S. Navy doctrine. They may provide some degree of protection against an unexpected attack. And they likely increase the survival of PLAN submarines in longer wars.
The PLAN is not alone in valuing the defensive strength of rock. The Swedish Navy recently announced that it would reopen its Cold War super-base at Muskö outside Stockholm. That site can house several submarines or warships and has maintenance facilities. Other countries which appear to have submarine tunnels include Taiwan, North Korea
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
.
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


Here the one on
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

1588714174635.png
 
Last edited:

by78

Brigadier
I'll post this here since I can't find a precise thread for it.

This year's national innovation prize list. Of interest is the 2nd item from the bottom: "水下发射大型固体运载火箭". The team behind a "large underwater-launched solid-fuel carrier rocket" is being recognized for their work. This is a bit funny since I can't think of a good reason why a (civilian) 'carrier rocket' should be launched from beneath the waves. I think they are obviously referring to a SLBM. The only candidate i can think of is JL-3.


 

stannislas

New Member
Registered Member
I'll post this here since I can't find a precise thread for it.

This year's national innovation prize list. Of interest is the 2nd item from the bottom: "水下发射大型固体运载火箭". The team behind a "large underwater-launched solid-fuel carrier rocket" is being recognized for their work. This is a bit funny since I can't think of a good reason why a (civilian) 'carrier rocket' should be launched from beneath the waves. I think they are obviously referring to a SLBM. The only candidate i can think of is JL-3.


it was actually an old term used for previous cases before, same reason for the "Second Artillery"
 

Top