Things that really bother you


Gatekeeper

Major
Registered Member
I see where you are coming from, that kind of chest thumping angle only plays into the "China threat" and the perception of perennial tensions between China and the rest of the world, especially when paired with the existing underlying mistrust where the likely superficial interpretation (encouraged by those wanting to demonize China) would be: "Look, so much of the world was united against China even back then! It must be wrong/evil by nature!"

My point is that map requires too much context to interpret accurately and when used simplistically tends to lend its weight to mischaracterizing China rather than not.



Fair enough though Australia would be the exception rather than the rule among most colonies/invaded/occupied countries/peoples.
Yes no doubt that's the intend to make it look like the whole world is against China. But it doesn't change the facts that these dominions were under the control of the 8 nations empires!
 

Dolcevita

Senior Member
I do not get it why Google News USA disproportionately highlights Epoch Times articles as default recommended readings. It is treated with much more weight by google than China Daily, etc.

Could it just be a default algorithmic settings by google for China-related articles?
Surely this is not mainstream news outlet in the US or is it?
 

Gatekeeper

Major
Registered Member
I do not get it why Google News USA disproportionately highlights Epoch Times articles as default recommended readings. It is treated with much more weight by google than China Daily, etc.

Could it just be a default algorithmic settings by google for China-related articles?
Surely this is not mainstream news outlet in the US or is it?
It is because it's the most anti-China publication out there I guess.

Here's an excellent piece regarding journalism and their reports on Xinjing. The best bit us around 4.30. When the head of the 'world urgyhr council'. Was asked where did the 1 million urgyhr detention figures come from. After a few hmm and ah. He said he got it from......... The western publications! Lol.

 

AndrewS

Major
Registered Member
For China's part, in its dealings with Australia, I would urge patience and forbearance. As with any nation, China should recognise and acknowledge our legitimate national interests, whilst being aware that certain actions and statements, which might otherwise be reasonable, can act to inflame our anxieties and produce undesirable outcomes e.g. further US-Australia convergence. In the long-term I believe it is possible that Australia could come to enjoy a reasonably harmonious relationship with China born of mutual recognition and respect and the dissipation of old prejudices and anxieties. But that is only one possibility. The path ahead is not certain and navigating it successfully will require wisdom, patience, and a little luck.
I've recently seen a survey in post-pandemic Europe which measures the prevalence of the "new cold warrior" mentality which looks to the USA . Depending on the country, it ranges from 8%-25% with an average of 15%

Do you have any data on the Australian equivalent? My view is that it is likely higher, Say 1 in 3 of the population in Australia?

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Gatekeeper

Major
Registered Member
Don't know where to put this, so I'll put it here since it bothers me. This is the reason why Chinese living abroad feels persecuted.

And all the time, the West demonize China. Gee.

'A sad and glorious history':
One of NYC's last Chinese hand laundries closes

Robert Lee recalls success and racism. He starched the city's shirts through it all — but was forced to shut down because of Covid-19.



Robert Lee inside Sun's Laundry, his business of 61 years on the Lower East Side of New York City. (Sheldon Chau / Leap Man Productions)
By Hanna Park
Oct. 9, 2020
For more than half a century, residents of Manhattan's East Village neighborhood would pick up their freshly starched shirts in flimsy plastic bags from Sun's Laundry. The store's red vintage sign, silver countertop bell, Chinese and Westernized calendars, bright customer tickets and over-the-counter conversations served as relics of a bygone era.
Now, the shop sits desolate after having closed at the end of August, following decades during which the Sun family spent their days washing clothes in mixed starch and water, then taking an electric stainless steel iron to the garments to present their customers with crisp, pressed shirts. At night, they retreated to their two-bedroom apartment unit above the store.
The Chinese hand laundry store — known for packaging the final product in traditional brown paper and twine — was one of the last in Manhattan, and it had been operating as a family business since 1959, with Robert S. Lee, 84, at the helm. He opened it with his father, Lee Dow Sun, after whom it's named. During the 1930s, Sun also owned a laundry in Boston, where Lee had first immigrated searching for opportunity.

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