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lcloo

Senior Member
I feel this might be a little more provocation than I am comfortable with. The PLAN is conducting this FONOP immediately on the heels of signing a security agreement with the Solomon Islands. This whole thing has the potential to really put Australians on edge and escalate anxieties... We can probably cut the Aussies some slack, which will persuade them not to do anything drastic
Scott Morrison's response.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the ship's proximity to Australia was a reminder of the geo-strategic reality.

"They'll keep a close eye on us and I can assure you, Australia, in our national interest, will always be keeping a close eye on them," Mr Morrison said.

The Prime Minister did not repeat Mr Dutton's claim this was an act of aggression.

"I certainly don't believe that when you take it together with the many coercive acts and the many statements that have been made attacking Australia's nation interest, you could describe it as an act of bridge-building or friendship," Mr Morrison said.
 

el pueblo unido

Junior Member
Registered Member
I feel this might be a little more provocation than I am comfortable with. The PLAN is conducting this FONOP immediately on the heels of signing a security agreement with the Solomon Islands. This whole thing has the potential to really put Australians on edge and escalate anxieties... We can probably cut the Aussies some slack, which will persuade them not to do anything drastic
why its just a small patrol of a spy plane, wait till the US style AC strike package freedom of navigation in the future, every right to be off the Australian costs according to PM Morrison
 

5unrise

New Member
Registered Member
Scott Morrison's response.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the ship's proximity to Australia was a reminder of the geo-strategic reality.

"They'll keep a close eye on us and I can assure you, Australia, in our national interest, will always be keeping a close eye on them," Mr Morrison said.

The Prime Minister did not repeat Mr Dutton's claim this was an act of aggression.


"I certainly don't believe that when you take it together with the many coercive acts and the many statements that have been made attacking Australia's nation interest, you could describe it as an act of bridge-building or friendship," Mr Morrison said.
The comments you quote from Scomo seem to indicate, at least to me, that he does not view the move as a bridge-building or friendship exercise. I believe he is saying that, when you interpret the move in the context of what he claims to be "coercive acts and many statements attacking Australia", it is not a friendly move. To be clear, I think Australia is like 80 percent to blame for what has happened, and they played the victim mentality after they threw the first punch. But I am just paraphrasing what I think he said.

Clearly, everyone is against my comment, and I kind of regret making it - there's just no need. But I must clarify that I don't view the move as a provocation, but it will be perceived as a provocation by Australians, whether that be the voters or the Government. I am just talking about perceptions. If the Australian tries to use the incident as a way to drum up public support for more defence spending, that would not be good for China or regional stability.

I don't know if anyone has been watching Australian TV, but there has been some fairly rabid voices calling for a military invasion of the Solomon Islands. They are not the mainstream opinion, to be sure, but they have been given a voice. This is what I mean when I said we don't want them to do anything drastic - don't fuel what really should be fringe views.
 

Bellum_Romanum

Major
Registered Member
The comments you quote from Scomo seem to indicate, at least to me, that he does not view the move as a bridge-building or friendship exercise. I believe he is saying that, when you interpret the move in the context of what he claims to be "coercive acts and many statements attacking Australia", it is not a friendly move. To be clear, I think Australia is like 80 percent to blame for what has happened, and they played the victim mentality after they threw the first punch. But I am just paraphrasing what I think he said.

Clearly, everyone is against my comment, and I kind of regret making it - there's just no need. But I must clarify that I don't view the move as a provocation, but it will be perceived as a provocation by Australians, whether that be the voters or the Government. I am just talking about perceptions. If the Australian tries to use the incident as a way to drum up public support for more defence spending, that would not be good for China or regional stability.

I don't know if anyone has been watching Australian TV, but there has been some fairly rabid voices calling for a military invasion of the Solomon Islands. They are not the mainstream opinion, to be sure, but they have been given a voice. This is what I mean when I said we don't want them to do anything drastic - don't fuel what really should be fringe views.
If Australia invades the Solomon Islands due to the recently entered security partnership then it will shatter the illusion of the west led and pushed by the U.S. about it's lies claiming to respect countries right to choose and sovereignty. Not to mention such reckless action will be viewed by ASEAN countries as further evidence that QUAD alliance, AUKUS are indeed nothing more than western medieval ways of yet again imposing their colonial mindset back into the subcontinent placing the fastest growing economic region into greater economic uncertainty, greater instability, and even destabilization or fall of respective governments.

Let Australian kangaroos conduct their illegal invasion and see how the western world reacts because we know it'll be a double standard which would just work fine and dandy for China's overall goals in the region of establishing it's Global Security Initiative.
 

vincent

Senior Member
I don't know if anyone has been watching Australian TV, but there has been some fairly rabid voices calling for a military invasion of the Solomon Islands. They are not the mainstream opinion, to be sure, but they have been given a voice. This is what I mean when I said we don't want them to do anything drastic - don't fuel what really should be fringe views.
I'm sure China is more than happy to have Aussies advocating Soloman Island invasions, they would love it even more if the Aussies actually invade
 

Lime

New Member
Registered Member
It is not a good choice for Australia, who has a very long coastline but don't have a powerful navy, to provocate other country whose navy is stronger. Finally, Australia need to spend more money to defend their coastline.
But due to the small population and the total economic volume, these expenditure cannot be supported in a long time.
 

Tam

Brigadier
Registered Member
It is not a good choice for Australia, who has a very long coastline but don't have a powerful navy, to provocate other country whose navy is stronger. Finally, Australia need to spend more money to defend their coastline.
But due to the small population and the total economic volume, these expenditure cannot be supported in a long time.

That reminds me of an Australian comedy skit, where there was a conference room and a meeting of politicians, generals and admirals. It sort of went like this.

Admiral: We have to defend our trade routes.
Politician: From who?
Admiral: From China.
Politician: And who is our number one trading partner?
Admiral: China.
Then everyone looks at each other around.
 

tphuang

Brigadier
VIP Professional
Registered Member
This Australian administration is full of comedians. They just gave China great gift calling freedom of navigation "an act of aggression". If China had any sense, it should use that to call all American/Australian FOP acts of aggression and refer to this comment. Great way to show Australian hyprocrisy.

I see Australia as nothing but a strategic annoyance. You have a nation trying to have power projection and blue water navy with minimal domestic military/high tech industrial base and 1/30th America's military budget. It's bound to be a major disaster. But Australia does have importance to China with its valuable natural resources and a decent sized market for Chinese product. You don't want that relationship to deteriorate too much.
 

siegecrossbow

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
That reminds me of an Australian comedy skit, where there was a conference room and a meeting of politicians, generals and admirals. It sort of went like this.

Admiral: We have to defend our trade routes.
Politician: From who?
Admiral: From China.
Politician: And who is our number one trading partner?
Admiral: China.
Then everyone looks at each other around.
 

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