Movies in General


AssassinsMace

Brigadier
I saw Mortal Kombat on HBO Max. I was waiting for a tournament and it didn't have one. I guess if this one is popular and sequels are made then a tournament will happen. Probably not going to happen.
 
Last edited:

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
What a disappointment. The 1995 movie is so much better, thanks to the performance of Christopher Lambert and Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa. Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa defined Shang "Your Soul is Mine" Tsung, that subsequent video games based Shang Tsung off his interpretation.




The similar event in the new movie can be described as so feeble.

The saving grace in the 2021 movie is Joe Taslim who does Sub Zero. Hiroyuki Sanada is miscast here. He should have been Shang Tsung. You have to take the most senior and best actor in your entire cast to play the villain, and give him the best lines of the movie.
 

solarz

Brigadier
What a disappointment. The 1995 movie is so much better, thanks to the performance of Christopher Lambert and Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa. Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa defined Shang "Your Soul is Mine" Tsung, that subsequent video games based Shang Tsung off his interpretation.




The similar event in the new movie can be described as so feeble.

The saving grace in the 2021 movie is Joe Taslim who does Sub Zero. Hiroyuki Sanada is miscast here. He should have been Shang Tsung. You have to take the most senior and best actor in your entire cast to play the villain, and give him the best lines of the movie.

Completely agreed.

The original Mortal Kombat movie was an unpretentious kung fu action flick with colorful and memorable characters. I didn't care for any of its sequels precisely because they tried to put in more plot twists.
 

Lethe

Senior Member
Has anybody seen "Nomadland"? Our morning radio commentator reckons it's an example of "wokeness"gone mad.

I've seen it. It was ok. It probably didn't deserve to win five million Academy awards, but that's just bandwagoning that has happened many times before and will no doubt happen in future and isn't worth getting worked up about either. Your radio commentator has a rather strange take on it if you ask me. The criticism I've read has been about how the film indulges in a personal examination of an atypical main character rather than engaging with the broader issues that have led to the emergence of this "nomad" class and the realities of their employment and the precarity of their existence. The film's depiction of working in an Amazon warehouse in particular has come in for criticism (they received permission to film in an actual Amazon warehouse, which no doubt came with a bunch of clauses about the subsequent content of the film). In its harshest form this line of criticism accuses the film of indulging in a particular brand of American mythology, casting these nomads as a new generation of rootless "cowboys", portraying this life as more or less a wilful exercise in self-determination while excusing the society that has failed these people and the corporations that prey on them as a source of disposable labour.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tam

Lethe

Senior Member
I recently saw Aquarela. It is classified as a documentary, but really it is more of an audio-visual meditation on the power and majesty of water. There is no voiceover, just extraordinary images and sounds. Definitely a film to dim the lights and crank the speakers up.

The most extraordinary sequence occurs when the filmmakers are out on Lake Baikal in Siberia and, entirely by chance, happen to capture a tragedy where a car plunges through the ice into the icy waters below and one of the three people inside do not make it out.

 
Last edited:

Top