Chinese Radar Developments - KLJ series and others


voyager1

Senior Member
Registered Member
The fire control radar equipped on the China-Pakistan jointly developed JF-17 fighter jet is already at the most advanced level in the world,
This seems strange. Why would China export its most advanced radar to another country? Shouldnt China ideally keep the best to its own planes?
 

ougoah

Major
Registered Member
:rolleyes:

Hendrick means it is an AESA. That was the binary indicator for "advanced level". That radar is not even close to being the most advanced in China or the world. It may be the latest fighter AESA developed and produced in China (until a new one for J-15 or J-31/35) but that doesn't mean it is the most advanced or the most capable produced in China. The J-20's certainly would take that. This is just for fighter radars.
 

gelgoog

Captain
Registered Member
This seems strange. Why would China export its most advanced radar to another country? Shouldnt China ideally keep the best to its own planes?

I think the radar technology of the JF-17 Block 3 will likely be the most advanced they have at the time of introduction yes. But due to limitations of radar size and power in an aircraft of the size of the JF-17 I doubt will be better than, say, the J-20's radar.
 

siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
Common military standard control or interface bus.

Su-27 N001 upgrade to N001V includes an upgraded processor.

The radar may only need to assume its still using an R-77. The PL-12 would have to be compatible with the R-77's datalink.



The Su-27UBK starting from the second batch, did also, for the expressed purpose of training pilots of the above for that use.



J-10B has an earlier AESA. Chinese radar institutes may have skipped the PESA thing due to the possibility they were unable to develop a TWT, magnetron, or klystron of the proper size, weight and power ratio in time, and they decided to skip the whole stage into AESA, which would not have required such.



The Russian munitions would have expired after ten years. That would already have happened long before yesterday.

J-10b uses PESA radar. There is a reason China produced a small batch of them before moving on to J-10C. That said, China didn't skip PESA. L-15B uses it still.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
So the upgraded processor would imply an official factory upgrade (unless Ukraine could also have offered this)

The aging Su-30 reminds me of the Sunburn, since they are of similar vintage. Sunburn used to be THE CARRIER KILLER, THE MOST FEARED AShM

Second batch Su-27UBK got the N001V upgrade to allow for R-77 use.
All the J-11A kits got the N001V as part of the package, the new chip brings it to the 486 level.
Only the first and second batch of Su-27SK that was made by KNAAPO were non-R-77 compatible.
Su-30MKK's radar got another processor upgrade on top of this.
Su-30MK2's radar got yet another processor upgrade on top of the MKK's.

Sunburn is still nasty, despite being an old missile. The reason for this, is that compared to the P500 Bazalt that equips the Slava class and the P700 Granit that equips the Kirov class, the Moskit can fly much lower, under 7 meters, making it much more difficult to intercept while conducting evasive maneuvers.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
J-10b uses PESA radar. There is a reason China produced a small batch of them before moving on to J-10C. That said, China didn't skip PESA. L-15B uses it still.


NRIET skipped the entire PESA cycle entirely, just like they did on the Type 052C. You will have a hard time finding any parallel feed PESA in the entire PLA. This kind of PESA connects the main and central power amplifier and transmitter, with hundreds, or thousands of lines to each element, and so it is actually very difficult and time consuming to produce, not to mention requires a high level of tolerance and quality, with each line must have a very exact length across well over a thousand elements. The kind of PESA you see in service with SAMs, are different animals, ranging from optical feed PESA, where the transmitter feed projects the signal to the back of the array through an optical lens, or the frequency scan planar array, where you have a serial line feed at the side. Compared to the complexity of using a parallel line PESA, an AESA is much simpler. Mind you, there are four different kinds of PESA based on their feed systems, the PLA as a whole only placed into service two of them while the Russians did all four.

People think that you have to develop a PESA first before going to AESA is the ground for this myth, when you can choose to leapfrog it.

Hongdu JL-10 likely uses slotted array. I don't see why a trainer would go through the expense and complexity of using a parallel line feed PESA.
 
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siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
NRIET skipped the entire PESA cycle entirely, just like they did on the Type 052C. You will have a hard time finding any parallel feed PESA in the entire PLA. This kind of PESA connects the main and central power amplifier and transmitter, with hundreds, or thousands of lines to each element, and so it is actually very difficult and time consuming to produce, not to mention requires a high level of tolerance and quality, with each line must have a very exact length across well over a thousand elements. The kind of PESA you see in service with SAMs, are different animals, ranging from optical feed PESA, where the transmitter feed projects the signal to the back of the array through an optical lens, or the frequency scan planar array, where you have a serial line feed at the side. Compared to the complexity of using a parallel line PESA, an AESA is much simpler. Mind you, there are four different kinds of PESA based on their feed systems, the PLA as a whole only placed into service two of them while the Russians did all four.

People think that you have to develop a PESA first before going to AESA is the ground for this myth, when you can choose to leapfrog it.

Hongdu JL-10 likely uses slotted array. I don't see why a trainer would go through the expense and complexity of using a parallel line feed PESA.

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The extended nose section of L-15B differentiates it from the L-15 trainer. The nose section houses a passive electronically scanned array (PESA) radar. The X-band PESA radar can guide air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles to a maximum range of 111km.
 

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