Chinese AEGIS capability and comparison


Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
Not like that. I was speculating that the new radar might be able to operate both in S-band and L-band. Thereby it would be fully backwards compatible with HHQ-9 and gain additional capability against VLO and ballistic missiles.

You would have to physically separate the L-band array from the S-band, and the L-band array itself won't be so small. Preferably something similar to the SMART-L. I don't think the 055 radar has the bandwidth to operate all the way to the L-band, and if there is need to increase its range and gain capability against VLO, it would have to be a combination of increased power, increased Tx gain, increased Rx gain, and a longer pulse + pulse compression.

Ironically, the many fan based CGI of the 055 speculating on the ship have this same idea of using an L-band. The Chinese SMART-L idea isn't grounded in fantasy. It showed up in an official model of a 052D export variant offered by CSSC and shown in a defense expo years ago. Speculation grew that it will be part of a new destroyer or destroyer variant.


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I have never seen the Chinese Navy used any L-band in their ship other than Type 518 radar which was part of the original fit for the Type 052 destroyers, the radar itself removed and replaced by Type 517 during their refit in 2012.

The first drawing on the top is funny because the artist there speculated the appearance of a dual sided radar ala SPQ-9B for a Chinese warship long before it actually happened---which it did, on a much different ship, on the Type 075.
 
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nlalyst

Junior Member
Registered Member
You would have to physically separate the L-band array from the S-band, and the L-band array itself won't be so small. Preferably something similar to the SMART-L. I don't think the 055 radar has the bandwidth to operate all the way to the L-band, and if there is need to increase its range and gain capability against VLO, it would have to be a combination of increased power, increased Tx gain, increased Rx gain, and a longer pulse + pulse compression.
I thought it might be possible with one phased array to radiate in two bands. Some radars can do this. But yes, increasing transmit power, lowering receiver noise and improving signal processing can provide very meaningful gains.
The first drawing on the top is funny because the artist there speculated the appearance of a dual sided radar ala SPQ-9B for a Chinese warship long before it actually happened---which it did, on a much different ship, on the Type 075.
My impression was that the author took inspiration from the Atago class when drawing the superstructure.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
I thought it might be possible with one phased array to radiate in two bands. Some radars can do this. But yes, increasing transmit power, lowering receiver noise and improving signal processing can provide very meaningful gains.

My impression was that the author took inspiration from the Atago class when drawing the superstructure.

Its called an interleaving phase array. But its more commonly set in reference in the context of telecom. Use in military radar? Its more in the realm of research paper right now.

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nlalyst

Junior Member
Registered Member
Its called an interleaving phase array. But its more commonly set in reference in the context of telecom. Use in military radar? Its more in the realm of research paper right now.
An old IEEE paper claimed that SPY-1A bandwidth extends into L band, so that makes one.

Waveguide ferrite phaseshifters can have bandwidths of two octaves. Microwave tube bandwidth can exceed 3 octaves. Theoretically, it seems plausible.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
An old IEEE paper claimed that SPY-1A bandwidth extends into L band, so that makes one.

Waveguide ferrite phaseshifters can have bandwidths of two octaves. Microwave tube bandwidth can exceed 3 octaves. Theoretically, it seems plausible.

Issue is more on the array's element antennas, dipoles and waveguides. The array itself can stretch its bandwidth, but it can result also in grating lobes in one end and mutual coupling on another. This affects the way the phase array can form a narrow beam.

Dual band S and C-band Type 382 radar shares the same amp for both faces, but one face is rougher than the other and one face is finer than the other. The courser antenna with the more separated wave guides should handle the S-band, while the finer array with the thinner, closer waveguides should handle the C-band.

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