China's SCS Strategy Thread


plawolf

Brigadier
If the sub hit a natural feature, the captain would have been relieved of duty. The fact that he has not been relieved suggest the USN didn’t think it hit a natural underwater feature.

My current theory is that the sub hit either a Chinese underwater platform, or it hit the mooring chain of a floating platform, with the latter much more likely

China has been deploying a lot of them, especially the floating ones, so it’s possible the USN failed to map them quickly enough and the sub hit one that wasn’t on its charts.

That would be easy and quick to validate, hence why the captain was not relieved as it was not his fault.

These floating platforms are chained to heavy foundations on the sea floor, so running into one at speed is no joke. But the chains do have some give, which may be why there weren’t more serious casualties on the seawolf.

The chain would have dug deep into the sonar dome, and the sub’s momentum would easily have ripped the whole thing off as it caught on the chain.

The most interesting part of the damaged seawolf I want to see are the dive plains. As if my theory is correct, I would expect to see some damage to one of the dive plains as well. That could also explain why the sub was forced to surface, as a damaged dive plain would significantly impair its ability to travel underwater.
 

VioletsForSpring

New Member
Registered Member
If the sub hit a natural feature, the captain would have been relieved of duty. The fact that he has not been relieved suggest the USN didn’t think it hit a natural underwater feature.

My current theory is that the sub hit either a Chinese underwater platform, or it hit the mooring chain of a floating platform, with the latter much more likely

China has been deploying a lot of them, especially the floating ones, so it’s possible the USN failed to map them quickly enough and the sub hit one that wasn’t on its charts.

That would be easy and quick to validate, hence why the captain was not relieved as it was not his fault.

These floating platforms are chained to heavy foundations on the sea floor, so running into one at speed is no joke. But the chains do have some give, which may be why there weren’t more serious casualties on the seawolf.

The chain would have dug deep into the sonar dome, and the sub’s momentum would easily have ripped the whole thing off as it caught on the chain.

The most interesting part of the damaged seawolf I want to see are the dive plains. As if my theory is correct, I would expect to see some damage to one of the dive plains as well. That could also explain why the sub was forced to surface, as a damaged dive plain would significantly impair its ability to travel underwater.
He was relieved of duty.
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VioletsForSpring

New Member
Registered Member
Well, as you said, it seems that the old time honoured tradition of scapegoating the captain is still alive and well
Unfortunately, currently our navy has a severe risk aversion problem. I understand the importance of disciplinary actions, but these were good sailors operating one of our best submarines, very sad to see.
 

Jono

Junior Member
Registered Member
Unfortunately, currently our navy has a severe risk aversion problem. I understand the importance of disciplinary actions, but these were good sailors operating one of our best submarines, very sad to see.
agree.
those 3 officers must be highly talented and possess superior/exceptional qualities to be put at the helm of a Seawolf.
to have their promising careers abruptly cut off ignominiously as scapegoats is very very sad and distressing indeed.
a loss to USN in my humble opinion.
But OTOH, a gain to PLAN, if I may say so, after all, there are only 3 Seawolves. or shall I say, were.
 

escobar

Brigadier
Chinese warplanes were also in the air, but they kept a "professional" distance, while sending a signal of sorts by turning away just within missile-firing range - about 150 miles out. "They were not engaging or locking us up or anything like that whatsoever. But the ranges at which they were flying at were indicative of what they would do for real."
"On a couple of occasions we were confident we knew where their submarines were," Cdre Moorhouse said. "So we literally almost hold the submarine where it is using our frigates and helicopters and then we can move the carrier around it, literally side-stepping it, so we can continue on our way safely."
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Michaelsinodef

Junior Member
Registered Member

Kinda interesting video although there's lots of problems with it (all the assumptions, inaccuracies, the various decisions made etc.).

But hey, checked and didn't see it posted here (might be in another thread) and it might be fun overall to discuss about it.
 

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