China's Defense/Military Breaking News Thread


tphuang

Brigadier
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Re: Chinese Military News Thread

This is just another Russian paper stating what we already know, that China is not buying any more Russian military hardware. They still claim it's because Russia is not sharing their top stuff to China. But in reality, it wouldn't matter imo whether or not they chose to share their "top stuff".
he may meeting of the Russian-Chinese Commission on Military-Technical Cooperation has been postponed again, this time until autumn. In Moscow, they are saying that the change is due to changes in the personnel on the commission. In Beijing, they say it is due to the need to make improvements under current contracts. The real reason is most likely the substantial reduction in military-technical cooperation between Russia and China, which has lost exhausted potential in its current form.
Kommersant learned of the postponement of the commission meeting in the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation. “The reason is purely technical,” it was explained there, “a change of commission chairmen.” At the end of March, Sergey Ivanov, now first deputy prime minister, was replaced by new Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov.

Sources in the Russian defense industry have suggested to Kommersant that there is another reason the meeting is not being held. They say that they meeting was moved back by Beijing, which is demanding that improvements to Russian weapons be made under current contracts after Chinese testing. In particular, the test firing of a Moskit missile installed on a Project 956EM cruiser last year was a problem, as was the firing of a Club-S on a Project 636 vessel.

A source in the Russian government called claims made by the Chinese Defense Ministry groundless. “It was just a technical failure that the Chinese are taking advantage of to pressure us in negotiations on other topics. Both systems – the Moskit and the Club-S, have been tested and are in mass production,” the source said.

The endless postponement of the commission meeting must have more serious causes then. Military-technical cooperation between Russia and China, which has exhausted its potential in it current form, is being substantially reduced, if not completely cut out.

In the 1990s, many Russian defense enterprises were kept alive almost exclusively by Chinese contracts. Between 1992 and 2006, when total Russian arms exports amounted to $58.4 billion, China took delivery of about $26 billion worth military equipment and weapons. Today the situation has changed. “Russia has significantly expanded its arms deliveries geographically, so there is no loner a critical need for Chinese purchases,” explained Konstantin Makienko, an expert at the Center for the Analysis of Strategy and Technology. Last year and at the beginning of this year, large-scale agreements were reached with Algeria ($7.5 billion), Venezuela ($3 billion) and India ($2.6 billion) and contracts with Libya (up to $2.2 billion) and Syria ($2-3 billion) being prepared.

China has lost much of its interest in purchases of Russian military equipment. In the 1990s, Beijing did not have much choice. After the West imposed an arms embargo on China because of the events at Tiananmen Square in 1989, China had to satisfy its weapons needs with Russian orders. Having purchased a large amount of Russian weapons in the last 15 years, China no longer needs significant supplies. A sign of this was Beijing's pullout several months ago from negotiations for the purchase of four Zubr troop-carrying hovercraft worth $210 million. Negotiations on the delivery of up to 48 Su-33 anti-ship aircraft for $2.5 billion have slowed down. Up to 70 percent of Russian military exports went to China in the second half of the 1990s. In 2006, China's share had fallen to 40 percent, and it is expected to be 17-20 this year.

“The Russian military-industrial complex mainly supplied China with arms developed in Soviet times,” Andrey Karneev, deputy director of the Institute of the Countries of Asia and Africa, told Kommersant. “Now that reserve has been exhausted. The Chinese want to receive more modern systems from Russia. But Russia won't include missile technology in the sphere of cooperation for understandable reasons.” Alexander Lukin, director of the Center for Asiatic Studies at the Moscow State Institute of Foreign Relations explained that “We have already armed China more than once. In the 1960s, those weapons were used against our border forces. That does not mean that nothing of the kind will happen again, but there remains a certain caution in relations with China, and so Russia doesn't want to sell it its newest weapons.”

The matter will not reach a full stop to Russian-Chinese military technology cooperation. “We most likely will supply parts for systems China has already bought for a long time, Karneev observed. In addition, Beijing is not ready to cut military technology cooperation with Moscow fully either. The United States and European Union have not removed the embargo on weapons sales yet. And Israel, under pressure from Washington, is also refusing to sell China its latest weapons.
 

szbd

Junior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

Well, at least their top nuclear sub stuff could be very useful for us. And seems we can forget about the zubr deal now, right?
 

tphuang

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Re: Chinese Military News Thread

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This is kind of interesting, mentionning military cooperation between China and Argentina. Also mentions sale of military truck to Argentina. They also mentionned helicopter on Chinese forums. Could be a start of Chinese exports to South America?
 

szbd

Junior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

Argentina hasn't got any new important weapons for 2.5 decades. Most of the Chinese new stuff are good enough for them. This is a good bussiness oppertunity. Just do not know how China will handle her relationship with Britain.
 

Ryz05

Junior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

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This is kind of interesting, mentionning military cooperation between China and Argentina. Also mentions sale of military truck to Argentina. They also mentionned helicopter on Chinese forums. Could be a start of Chinese exports to South America?
I think the South Americans are seeking another country to counter the American dominance. The same thing is happening in Southeast Asia, where many countries seek to improve relations with the US military against a rising China.
 

goldenpanda

Banned Idiot
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

Pictured below;
Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Mullen speaks with Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy Commander-in-Chief Adm. Wu Shengli after a Full Honors Ceremony at the Naval Museum in Washington, D.C. on April 4, 2007 and presents him with a commemorative plaque.
PLAN got some impressive looking commanders. From the photos it might seem like it's China that got the twenty times more powerful navy ;)
 

szbd

Junior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

I believe Argentina can have the ability to secure that islands with several billions US dollar of investment on Chinese weapons and some of their own efforts.
 

FriedRiceNSpice

Senior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

PLAN got some impressive looking commanders. From the photos it might seem like it's China that got the twenty times more powerful navy ;)
lol Did you notice the chubby fellow with glasses? The bald old man also fails to make quite an impression on me. But that other commander looks like he could be a commander from a war movie... The American commander pictured does not seem very masculine at all.
 

Roger604

Senior Member
Re: Chinese Military News Thread

Yeah that guy looks like an accountant, not like what you would expect from a USN Admiral!

Imagine, a guy who looks like an accountant commanding the most powerful naval force in world history!
 
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bd popeye

The Last Jedi
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Re: Chinese Military News Thread

Yeah that guy looks like an accountant, not like what you would expect from a USN Admiral!

Imagine, a guy who looks like an accountant commanding the most powerful naval force in world history!
And I will also be off topic.:D This is just an :eek:ff response to the previous post.

USN CNO Mike Mullen is a no nonsense type of leader. Looks can be decieving. He was chosen strictly on his merit as a commander.

I doubt that very few naval officers in the entire world have as much experience as ADM Mullen......

Admiral Michael G. Mullen

A native of Los Angeles, Calif., Admiral Mullen graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1968. He has served in Allied, Joint and Navy positions, overseas and in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets.

As a junior officer, he served in various leadership positions aboard USS Collett (DD 730), USS Blandy (DD 943), USS Fox (CG 33) and USS Sterett (CG 31). Adm. Mullen commanded three ships: USS Noxubee (AOG 56), USS Goldsborough (DDG 20), and USS Yorktown (CG 48). As a Flag Officer, he commanded Cruiser-Destroyer Group Two and the George Washington Battle Group. Adm. Mullen's last command at sea was as Commander, U.S. Second Fleet/Commander, NATO Striking Fleet Atlantic.

Ashore, Adm. Mullen served as Company Officer and Executive Assistant to the Commandant of Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy. He also served in the Bureau of Naval Personnel as Director, Surface Officer Distribution and in the Office of the Secretary of Defense on the staff of the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation. On the Chief of Naval Operations' staff, Adm. Mullen served as Deputy Director and Director of Surface Warfare; Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Resources, Requirements, and Assessments (N8); and as the 32nd Vice Chief of Naval Operations.

Adm. Mullen graduated from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., with a Master of Science degree in Operations Research. He is also a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard Business School.

Adm. Mullen's last operational assignment was Commander, Joint Force Command Naples/Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe. Based in Naples, Italy, he had operational responsibility for NATO missions in the Balkans, Iraq, and the Mediterranean as well as providing overall command, operational control, and coordination of U.S. naval forces in the European Command area of responsibility.

Admiral Mullen became the 28th Chief of Naval Operations on July 22, 2005.
The guy can't help it if he looks like your next door neighbor..:D

Enough said.
 

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