China Ballistic Missiles and Nuclear Arms Thread


Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Not necessarily, If Teng Yun is powered by TBCC they just need to slow it down to supersonic then use turbo engine to get it back home.
Depends on what systems they developed and would want to test. Ramjet and scramjet can be tested.

Anyway, all this is IF it is part of a Spaceplane development project.
 

enroger

Junior Member
Registered Member
Depends on what systems they developed and would want to test. Ramjet and scramjet can be tested.

Anyway, all this is IF it is part of a Spaceplane development project.

Ramjet or scramjet can all be tested with a small solid booster, they only need it to get to about Mach 4 plus. Using LM rocket is overkill.

Yeah it's all wild guess at this point, just shooting the breeze here...
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Ramjet or scramjet can all be tested with a small solid booster, they only need it to get to about Mach 4 plus. Using LM rocket is overkill.

Yeah it's all wild guess at this point, just shooting the breeze here...
I don't think anybody knows what LM series rocket was used. I am not knowledgeable on variety of rockets but I've been asking about it in other threads ( to no avail).
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Presumably it was a LM-2, I think it was somewhere in the original FT article?
I missed this. And for the benefit of those who missed this:

The China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, which oversees launches, on July 19 said on an official social media account that it had launched a Long March 2C rocket, which it added was the 77th launch of that rocket. On August 24 it announced that it had conducted a 79th flight. But there was no announcement of a 78th launch, which sparked speculation among observers of its space programme about a secret launch. CAAA did not respond to requests for comment.
 

Andy1974

Junior Member
Registered Member
They launched a long-range missile,” Hyten told CBS. “It went around the world, dropped off a hypersonic glide vehicle that glided all the way back to China, that impacted a target in China.” When pressed on whether the HGV hit the target, Hyten responded: “Close enough.”

A spaceplane on the other hand — such as the US Space Shuttle of the
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and what the Chinese Foreign Ministry claims was tested rather than a weapon system — goes up on a rocket booster and then hangs out in orbit for a while before using thrusters to re-enter the atmosphere. Spaceplanes are blunt nosed to help slow them down as they glide down to a runway for a soft landing, Lewis explained. By contrast, most HGVs are designed with sharp nose cones to reduce drag, he said.




Those who managed to get an idea of its flight path will very well be able to discern if it is a spaceplane or HGV.

Quite impressive either way. It ending up as a spaceplane or HGV should be not of a big concern to any party as China's adversaries won't be convinced that there'd NOT be a military application of the tech. China herself won't allow such a technology left unexplored or used militarily.

Until US tests a machine of the same calibre, the lead goes to China. Doesn't matter if the US has built and hid a wunderwaffe in Area51 or somewhere else ( its becoming a joke and excuse at this point).
A plane that flys in space doesn’t go into orbit, it goes from point to point. It would be designed to transport people and cargo quickly.

China also said this is a test of a component, not a system.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
A plane that flys in space doesn’t go into orbit, it goes from point to point. It would be designed to transport people and cargo quickly.

China also said this is a test of a component, not a system.
I was talking about the subject that was quoted from the article. In any case, I don't think US would release officially any more details that they have learned of the test. Neither will China.

Many firms in the world have conducted similar experiments and the separating part of the spacecraft was its accessory part, and it would burn and break up in the atmosphere and the debris would fall into international waters, China's Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said.
 

gelgoog

Captain
Registered Member
LM launch is not overkill if they were testing stage separation at high velocities.
You would need to carry two upper stages mated together.

But I agree that a TSTO HTHL vehicle would likely separate stages at like Mach 5-10 tops. It would not separate vehicles at Mach 20.
TSTO HTHL vehicle proposals typically rely on air breathing propulsion for first stage and air friction makes travel at higher velocities a PITA.
The only other possibility would be this is a test for a stage and a half vehicle rather than a two stage vehicle. The second stage would then be an orbital insertion vehicle, maybe just a small kickoff stage, and the first stage would have some sort of combined rocket and jet propulsion scheme so it could hit Mach 20. But it seems hard to hit Mach 20 in a single stage given current rocket engine technology and materials.
 

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