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ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

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Joint Support Ship Design Decision

BG–13.017 - June 2, 2013

The Government of Canada has selected a ship design for the Royal Canadian Navy’s future Joint Support Ships. This represents a major milestone within the Joint Support Ship project, and it is indicative of the Government’s commitment to moving the project forward, and to making an investment in Canadian shipbuilding.

The Selection and Process

Two ship designs were assessed to determine which would be right for the operations of the Royal Canadian Navy: a new design from BMT Fleet Technology and a proven off-the-shelf design by ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems Canada.

The selection of the design was conducted through a transparent and comprehensive process involving multiple government departments and third party advisors. The proven, off-the-shelf ship design from ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems Canada was selected as the best option. It offers the best overall combination of benefits. The assessment was based on three criteria: operational capability; affordability; and cost and schedule risks.

Operational capability: The main objective of the Joint Support Project is to renew the capabilities of the two current Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment Ships that are approaching the end of their service lives and need to be replaced. The Royal Canadian Navy is confident that the future Joint Support Ships will capably support deployed naval task groups and support operations ashore.

Affordability: The potential for variation in building costs is higher with a new design, and lower with a design that is known and has been built before. Therefore, cost estimates for building an existing design can be developed and refined with greater certainty. Between the two design options, the new design’s implementation costs are expected to be approximately 15 per cent more than the proven existing design. This means that only the existing design will allow the project to proceed with an acceptable rate of contingency funding.

Cost and schedule risks: The existing design has been proven both in build and operations. As the design was built and is operated by the German Navy, that experience reduces the risk of unexpected problems which would be associated with a new design.

In addition, construction cost estimates were validated by First Marine International, a firm of recognized experts in all areas of shipbuilding. Auditing firm KPMG reviewed the assessment methodology and monitored the process itself, as an independent third party.

The role of the Joint Support Ships

A Joint Support Ship increases the range and endurance of the Canadian Armed Forces by enabling naval task groups to stay at sea for long periods without obtaining provisions from ashore. The Joint Support Ships will supply deployed Naval Task Groups with fuel, ammunition, spare parts, food and water. They will also provide a home base for maintenance and operation of helicopters, a limited sealift capability, and support to operations ashore. Key distinctions of the selected design include the following:

Mission versatility: The Joint Support Ship will be based on an existing ship which was designed and built for operations as a support ship. It also offers the mission the flexibility and the ability to carry containerized payloads such as disaster relief supplies or portable headquarters for operations.

Environmental standards: The Joint Support Ship will meet current and forecasted international and Canadian environmental standards in the areas of air emissions and double-hulled construction. The PROTECTEUR-class currently is single-hulled and does not meet current shipbuilding standards.

Useable fuel: The selected design will have the ability to deliver a similar amount of useable fuel for the Task Group as the PROTECTEUR-class. While the PROTECTEUR-class has larger fuel capacity, it can not discharge its full payload without creating stability challenges.

Helicopter: The selected design option can carry two CH-148 Cyclone helicopters.

Next Steps

Once ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems Canada has prepared the design package, Canada will provide it to the Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd., for review. Once this review is completed, Canada will acquire the required license for the ship design. This license will enable Canada to use the ship design and build, operate, and maintain the Joint Support Ships – right here in Canada.

The design will be provided to Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd. to fully develop it to a production-ready state. This is a similar concept to developing detailed construction blue prints for a building from an architect’s plan. This design development work will be led by Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd., as part of the Joint Support Ship definition contract to be negotiated between the Government of Canada and the shipyard. This will further enhance the knowledge and technical skills among shipyard staff, to be leveraged for future work in the shipyard.

As the selected shipyard for non-combat vessels, Vancouver Shipyards will be responsible for the construction of all Joint Support Ships at their shipyard in North Vancouver, British Columbia. The design development contract will include the sourcing, by the shipyard, of all equipment and major services from available suppliers. Through this engagement Vancouver shipyards will be expected to demonstrate value to Canada including meeting its commitment to provide Industrial and Regional Benefits equal to 100 per cent of the value of the contract.
The Berlin Class AOR's:

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SHIP_T-AOR_Berlin_Class_A1412_FGS_Frankfurt-Am-Main_Portsmouth_CCASA3_Brian_Burnell_lg.jpg

Nice ships. This news will be well received in the Vancouver marine industry. A number of related/supporting programs and activities have been held in juggling mode waiting for a decision.
 

Jeff Head

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Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

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The Berlin Class AOR's:

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View attachment 7870

Nice ships. This news will be well received in the Vancouver marine industry. A number of related/supporting programs and activities have been held in juggling mode waiting for a decision.
These are a very good German design and will fill the Canadian needs very admirably. In addition to being built in Canada, and I am sure, with specific Canadian requirements.

20,000 tons. Armed with four 27mm autocannons and Stinger MANPADS, they have a large helo deck and a hanger to accomodate two helos, and they can be equipped with a very decent sized hospital as needed.



 

Pointblank

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Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

Some pictures released of the design:


 

Jeff Head

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Staff member
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Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

Some pictures released of the design:
Looks like two 20mm Phalanx CIWS for self defense.

I guess the hanger is the standard size of the other German vessels.

As I said, thy look like a really decent design for the Canadians.
 

Pointblank

Senior Member
Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

Looks like two 20mm Phalanx CIWS for self defense.

I guess the hanger is the standard size of the other German vessels.

As I said, thy look like a really decent design for the Canadians.
The Germans sized their hangar for a Sea King, so for us, as we will have the CH-148's, they will fit with some modifications to the layout. Also note the different RAS arrangement, only 1 deck crane, addition of 2 landing craft, and changes to the lifeboat arrangement. I don't know what other changes have been made to the design, but that's the most visible changes other than the inclusion of Phalanx.
 

Jeff Head

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Staff member
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Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

Please try to include original link next time :)

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Took me quite some effort to get these renders sent to me
Amen to that NavyReco. we want to give our talented SD posters credit where it is due and move people's reading to their sites whenever we can for sure.




And nice renderings that are!

Do you know, will there be any more weapons systems? Like perhaps a couple of Mk-38 25mm guns, or certainly some .50 cal (12.7mm) machine guns?
 

asif iqbal

Brigadier
Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

German engineering at its best, second to none! Great ship and great design
 

Pointblank

Senior Member
Re: ThyssenKrupp's Berlin Class AOR Design Selected As Canada's Next Supply Ship

Do you know, will there be any more weapons systems? Like perhaps a couple of Mk-38 25mm guns, or certainly some .50 cal (12.7mm) machine guns?
Probably some .50 cal machine guns and some small arms. I know the Navy was testing remote weapons systems in the past, but nothing's came of it.

ThyssenKrupp won the contest not based upon features, but on costs; the military believed that implementation costs would be 15% less with an off-the-shelf design, so that was the only contender offering enough contingency funding for an executable project. The competitor, depending on which stage of the competition was first the Spanish Cantabria Class AOR's, but that proposal was unsuccessful. It was then followed by BMT Fleet Technology with a version of their Aegir class AOR's, which a version is going to be built for the Royal Fleet Auxiliary as the Tide Class support tankers.
 

Pointblank

Senior Member
HMCS Algonquin and HMCS Protecteur collides at sea, no one hurt

One word: ouch!

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ESQUIMALT, B.C. - The Royal Canadian Navy says it will conduct two separate reviews as it attempts to determine why a routine training exercise between two warships on the Pacific went "dramatically wrong," as well as to assess the extent of the damage and the impact the incident will have on its operations.

HMCS Algonquin and HMCS Protecteur collided Friday afternoon during a towing exercise they were conducting while en route to Hawaii, the navy said.

Algonquin bore the brunt of the damage, with photos showing a large gash in the hangar along the port, or left, side of the ship. Protecteur fared better, but was also damaged on its front end.

Commodore Bob Auchterlonie, the commander of the navy's Pacific fleet, said the ships were conducting a towing exercise in which Algonquin was to tow Protecteur.

"To be very upfront and candid, something went dramatically wrong, and that's a bit of an understatement," Auchterlonie said in an interview Saturday.

"The ships were conducting a towing exercise, which was a normal part of our routine operations and normal business at sea. ... There is an inherent risk of ships operating together at sea in close proximity, but this sort of incident, I've not come across in my career."

The vessels each had more than 300 crew members on board, said Auchterlonie, though no injuries were reported.

The ships were on a deployment to the Asia-Pacific region, where they were scheduled to attend the International Fleet Review in Australia in early October before conducting a series of diplomatic stops with the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Instead, the ships were ordered to return to Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt, near Victoria, where they were expected to arrive by late Saturday afternoon.

Auchterlonie said the navy will convene a board of inquiry to investigate what caused the collision.

Each ship will also undergo a technical assessment to determine the extent of the damage and the repairs required before returning to service.

"The full impact of the sailing schedule has not yet been determined, but clearly by the extent of the damage on Algonquin, she's not deploying," said Auchterlonie.

"We're looking at options for Protecteur, as well."

Auchterlonie acknowledged even experienced sailors can be rattled by such an incident at sea, and he said their welfare is a priority.

"Both the command teams on board Algonquin and Protecteur are very engaged with their ships' companies, because the first concern we have is for the safety and security of our sailors," he said.

"Thankfully, no one was injured, but this was a significant event, and I'm going to ensure our sailors, when they get back, get the support for me and the entire formation."

Algonquin is an Iroquois-class destroyer built in the early 1970s, according to the Royal Canadian Navy's website.

Protecteur is an auxiliary oil replenishment ship — one of two such vessels in the navy that were launched in 1969.

The Department of Defence is currently considering a plan to build new supply ships to replace Protecteur and its sister ship, HMCS Preserver, which is based in Halifax.

— By James Keller in Vancouver
Pictures of the resulting damage:
HMS Algonquin:


HMCS Protecteur:
 

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