Aircraft Carriers III


aksha

Captain
Very, very nice.

Now for some decent, higher res shots from the port itself.

When we wait on the updates to these sat photos (unless someone has access to much more timely updates), we almost invariable see something that is many weeks old at best, and usually months old.

But this pic sure makes plain that the Island is installed and that the flight deck has been extended well back to the aft of the ship.

she will be undocked by the end of may


and pics
these are quite new (taken this month itself) and as posted in the old thread
in the first pic we see one of the elevators




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Vice Admiral Ashok Subedar, Controller, Warship Production and Acquisition, told the media today, “In May this we will undock the INS Vikrant. As much as 95 per cent of its hull is complete as is 22,000 tonnes of steel structure. The shafting and propeller work is in last stages”.



Despite challenges, all efforts are being made to meet the December 2018 deadline set by the Cabinet Committee on Security for commission of the INS Vikrant. After the undocking it will undergo harbour trials, sea trials followed by on-deck flight trials, Vice Admiral Subedar said.

......................

Talking about INS Vikramaditya, inducted in November 2013, the Vice Admiral said Israeli Barak missile is being installed on the ship at its home base Karwar, south of Goa.



Navy was originally looking at two options, either the Israeli Barak or the Russian Shitil missiles.


A Barak-missile launch will be taken from one of warships that is being decommissioned. Sources said the INS Godavari, which had been given a Barak launch system some 10 years ago, has a fully functional system that is being put on the aircraft carrier. The Godavari is 32 years old and is set for decommissioning.


“Fitting the Barak is a complex procedure which entails cutting through the deck. A period of some four months has been factored in for this”, sources said. The warship could carry up to 32 or 48 LR-SAMs.
 

Jura

General
this is the first time I've hear of Magic Carpet software:
Navy Starts Sea Testing New Carrier Landing Software for Fighter Jets
The
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is preparing for its first at-sea test of a new software program for
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designed to make it easier for the multi-role fighters to land on carriers.

“We’re going to take it to the ship this month,” Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, Director of Air Warfare, told Military.com in an interview.

The Navy will test the automated landing software system at sea following a string of recent successful land-based tests at
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The software is called
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, an acronym for Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies.

The technology is slated to deploy by 2019 on F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and
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electronic jamming aircraft.

It is designed to make landing on an
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easier by maintaining a commanded glideslope and angle of attack, giving the pilot the opportunity to focus more attention on maintaining a proper line-up, a Navy statement said.

“A pilot can take symbology on the HUD (heads up display) and he can move it to a symbol or a place on the flight deck and let go of the controls. The airplane knows with that symbol that is where I want to land. It will continually land on that spot,” Manazir explained.

The software helps the approaching aircraft lock in on the correct landing approach, removing the need for the pilot to continuously adjust the aircraft. Landing on a carrier requires the pilot to account for the aircraft’s speed, the speed of the ship along with wind and weather considerations. Pilots seek to maintain the proper glide slope as they approach the carrier deck.

“When we land an aircraft on an aircraft carrier, it is kind of a three connection thing. You see the deviation, you correct, you re-correct and then you correct one more time as you go so there you are kind of chasing the parameters,” Manazir said.

“With magic carpet, the pilot can move the stick and move reference point and the stick does not have to re-correct. That is where the airplane is going to go. It is control law software – and it actually moves the flight control surfaces to make that work — to where the aircraft is going to go. It is not just symbology,” Manazir said.

Navy test pilot Lt. Brent Robinson said the recent land-based flight and landing of Magic Carpet showed the technology could perform as was demonstrated in simulations.

“With the initial set of flights, we were able to confirm that these new flight control laws performed very much in line with our predictions from the simulators,” said Robinson, a Magic Carpet project officer. “The initial airborne response characteristics observed in both Path and Rate modes with both Full and Half flaps are very encouraging.”

The flight control algorithms for Magic Carpet were developed by Naval Air Systems Command and the Office of Naval Research.

If Magic Carpet becomes widely used throughout the Navy and emerges as a new standard for landing aircraft on carriers, pilots could then use more of their valuable training time working on weapons systems and other key avionics issues instead of practicing as much on how to land the plane on a carrier, Navy officials said.
source:
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Jeff Head

General
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  • #17
This is what I am talking about!


The Brits outght to be loving seeing this too.

These are the type of ops they will do off of the QE...accept with a ski-jump, and they will also do short landings more often than vertical.
 

Obi Wan Russell

Jedi Master
VIP Professional
Great video, and I can guarantee when the QECs are in service the USMC Lightning sqns will be regular visitors, building on their experience as Harrier operators cross decking to RN Invincible class CVS. When the RN talks about joint F-35B operations, I personally don't think they are talking about the RAF, they are looking across the pond to friends more interested in taking their birds to sea...;-)
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
Great video, and I can guarantee when the QECs are in service the USMC Lightning sqns will be regular visitors, building on their experience as Harrier operators cross decking to RN Invincible class CVS. When the RN talks about joint F-35B operations, I personally don't think they are talking about the RAF, they are looking across the pond to friends more interested in taking their birds to sea...;-)
Amen to every bit of that, Obi Wan!

125% spot on!
 

Quon_Duixote

New Member
This is what I am talking


The Brits outght to be loving seeing this too.

These are the type of ops they will do off of the QE...accept with a ski-jump, and they will also do short landings more often than vertical.
Great video!

Quick question: the stovl process is optimized for rough seas as well..also the vertical landing could be difficult in the event of strong lateral gusts on the high seas, won't it?
 

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