Afghanistan Military & News

delft

Brigadier
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US to expand Afghan capital’s security zone to extend military presence
The US military is planning to expand boundaries of the Green Zone in the Afghan capital Kabul in an effort to not only bring nearly all Western embassies, NATO and American military headquarters within the protected area, but to prolong US military presence in the country well into the 2020s.

US military authorities recently appointed an American brigadier general to oversee the project of greatly expanding and fortifying the Green Zone in Kabul, The New York Times reported Saturday.

After the completion of the huge project, the report noted, American Embassy staff in Kabul “will no longer need to take a Chinook helicopter ride to cross the street to a military base less than 100 yards outside the present Green Zone security district.”

After 16 years of the US-led military presence in the Afghan capital, it added, the expansion project serves as a “stark acknowledgment that even the city’s central districts have become too difficult to defend” against persisting terror bombings by Taliban insurgents.

This is while the US claimed at the outset of its military invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 that the occupation was aimed at rooting out the Taliban terrorists across the war-torn country.

The Green Zone expansion project, which will significantly limit access to the Afghan capital, was prompted by a massive truck bombing at a gate of the current zone on May 31, killing over 150 people and destroying most of the German Embassy.

In the first stage of the project – expected to take six to 12 months – an expanded Green Zone will be established, covering nearly 1.86 square miles – up from 0.71 miles – closing off streets within it to all but official traffic.

In the final stage, a larger Blue Zone will be created, covering most of the city center, where severe restrictions on movement — particularly by trucks — will be imposed. Eventually, all trucks seeking to enter Kabul will be routed through a single portal, where they will be X-rayed and searched.

The project is also aimed at protecting “another long-term American investment,” given the troop surge in the country to 15,000 from the existing 11,000 as the Trump administration’s new Afghan strategy calls for continued US military presence there well into the 2020s.

Unlike former US President Barack Obama, Trump has suggested that American forces should remain in Afghanistan until victory, although his own generals have admitted that a total military victory in the terror-ravaged country is not possible.

The US military mission in Afghanistan is expected to continue for many more years, despite its unpopularity with the American public and the rest of the world.

“It seems America is not yet ready to end the longest war in its history,” said Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid after Trump announced his new Afghan policy. “As Trump stated, ‘Americans are weary of the long war in Afghanistan.’ We shall cast further worry into them and force American officials to accept realities.”
Will that help to form a coalition government in Kabul including Taliban and will it help defeat Daesh?
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
21752814_10155697680163454_6819264810965074268_o.jpg
Two U.S. Air Force C-17 loadmasters assigned to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., prepare two Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopters for unloading Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60s are the first to be delivered to the AAF under the recapitalization program. The plan to recapitalize the AAF and increase its size will provide firepower and mobility enabling the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces to break the stalemate with insurgents. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
21640958_10155697680768454_2548433888395373291_o.jpg
An Afghan Air Force UH-60 is towed as two AAF A-29s taxi for take-off Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60 was the first to arrive in Afghanistan as part of recapitalization efforts to transition the AAF to a more sustainable and modern helicopter fleet. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
21587190_10155697680178454_5834148431324729321_o.jpg
A U.S. Air Force C-17 loadmaster assigned to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., prepares two Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopters for unloading Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. These are the first UH-60s to be delivered to Afghanistan for the recapitalization of the AAF and development of a professional, capable and sustainable Afghan Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
21762520_10155697680138454_7375622392771514824_o.jpg
Train, Advise, Assist Command-Air advisors observe as an Afghan Air Force UH-60 is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster, Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The TAAC-Air advisors have worked closely with their Afghan counterparts to prepare for the recapitalization of the AAF, as the service transitions from Mi-17s to UH-60s. These are the first AAF UH-60s to arrive in country. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
21743827_10155697680698454_4407904808113994046_o.jpg
U.S. Air Force Col. Armando Fiterre, the 738th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group commander, Train, Advise, Assist, Command-Air, watches as the first Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopter is unloaded off a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster, Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60 arrival is part of the recapitalization efforts of the AAF. The plan involves seven different weapon systems, 14 program offices and more than 20 major contracts. TAAC-Air will oversee training of AAF pilots and maintainers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
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delft

Brigadier
View attachment 42118
Two U.S. Air Force C-17 loadmasters assigned to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., prepare two Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopters for unloading Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60s are the first to be delivered to the AAF under the recapitalization program. The plan to recapitalize the AAF and increase its size will provide firepower and mobility enabling the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces to break the stalemate with insurgents. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
View attachment 42119
An Afghan Air Force UH-60 is towed as two AAF A-29s taxi for take-off Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60 was the first to arrive in Afghanistan as part of recapitalization efforts to transition the AAF to a more sustainable and modern helicopter fleet. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
View attachment 42120
A U.S. Air Force C-17 loadmaster assigned to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., prepares two Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopters for unloading Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. These are the first UH-60s to be delivered to Afghanistan for the recapitalization of the AAF and development of a professional, capable and sustainable Afghan Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
View attachment 42121
Train, Advise, Assist Command-Air advisors observe as an Afghan Air Force UH-60 is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster, Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The TAAC-Air advisors have worked closely with their Afghan counterparts to prepare for the recapitalization of the AAF, as the service transitions from Mi-17s to UH-60s. These are the first AAF UH-60s to arrive in country. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
View attachment 42122
U.S. Air Force Col. Armando Fiterre, the 738th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group commander, Train, Advise, Assist, Command-Air, watches as the first Afghan Air Force UH-60 helicopter is unloaded off a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster, Sept. 18, 2017, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. The UH-60 arrival is part of the recapitalization efforts of the AAF. The plan involves seven different weapon systems, 14 program offices and more than 20 major contracts. TAAC-Air will oversee training of AAF pilots and maintainers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Veronica Pierce)
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I suppose support and maintenance mostly by US contract personnel?
 

Equation

Lieutenant General
I am quite skeptical on the supply of above toys to Afghan dummy regime's unstable armed forces (except only where coalition forces are based) ...

It's IMO a repeating of same mistake from US which was done in 80s & 90s.... there is a huge possibility that these toys will end up in wrong hands.
QUOTE]

Just like what had happened to the US supporting an inept South Vietnamese government during the Vietnam war.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
There is so much difference between the two conflicts.
Vietnam was a divided nation with two line combined elements the NVA and the Vietcong. In Afghanistan It's not that clear cut.
The Russians invasion and the decades of infighting has lead to one fact, despite what is claimed in the media it is not 2 sides. It's everyone for themselves.

The Taliban is what it has always been local warlords in loose alliance simply because, the Government officials slighted them some time back when they were Warlords.
There loyalties are tribal, Clan based.
And not all Taliban are pro Taliban they are taliban because the taliban pay them or the Taliban pay their son or the Taliban leave them alone. or the Taliban arranged a Marriage for a niece.
Some Taliban can't stand other Taliban. Some "Taliban" align themselves with other parties Some AQ others the Self proclaimed Caliphate. Some are Pakistani backed others would happily fight the Pakistanis. Some grow poppies others don't. This is why a Coalition with them would never work because they are not a single entity

Even the Afghan government officials are the same, acting against each other in power struggles. Some Assassinating each other.
 

timepass

Brigadier
There is so much difference between the two conflicts.
Vietnam was a divided nation with two line combined elements the NVA and the Vietcong. In Afghanistan It's not that clear cut.
The Russians invasion and the decades of infighting has lead to one fact, despite what is claimed in the media it is not 2 sides. It's everyone for themselves.

The Taliban is what it has always been local warlords in loose alliance simply because, the Government officials slighted them some time back when they were Warlords.
There loyalties are tribal, Clan based.
And not all Taliban are pro Taliban they are taliban because the taliban pay them or the Taliban pay their son or the Taliban leave them alone. or the Taliban arranged a Marriage for a niece.
Some Taliban can't stand other Taliban. Some "Taliban" align themselves with other parties Some AQ others the Self proclaimed Caliphate. Some are Pakistani backed others would happily fight the Pakistanis. Some grow poppies others don't. This is why a Coalition with them would never work because they are not a single entity

Even the Afghan government officials are the same, acting against each other in power struggles. Some Assassinating each other.
Though your few assumptions are right but not all.

You cant simply name Taliban to every entity. There are warlords/Tribesmen, Daesh, ISIS, Indian backed militia (remember there are more than 30 Indian consulates near Pak Afghan border), Iran backed groups, there are some influence of Tajikistan & Chechnya too.

And what US did is simply try to curb few sections of above mention groups & didn't invest a single penny for the betterment of locals hence, US cant secure the trust & confidence of them. Therefore, locals don't support US or US backed government, instead they rather prefer to go with different groups.

The world has to remember that Pakistan still hosting more then 2 million refuges in camps & cities while earlier the figure was more than that. Pakistan paid very heavy price by hosting Afghanis as they impacted on our social circle by introducing ARMS/Drugs (Heroin/Cocaine) & smuggling.

Again I will retreat the same, if US wants peace & stability in the region then they have to address the above & its very simple start investing on ground for the betterment of local people & win the hearts (Like Chinese are doing in different parts of the world).
 
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