20th Century US Navy PIX!!

Air Force Brat

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An A-7 Corsair II aircraft starts down the starboard catapult during a takeoff from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV 64), 7/1/1980. PH1 David C. Maclean.

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A view of two Attack Squadron 72 (VA-72) A-7E Corsair aircraft en route to their targets during Operation Desert Storm. The aircraft are carrying Mark 20 Rockeye II anti-tank cluster bombs on their outboard wing pylons and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles on their fuselage pylons. VA-72 is based aboard the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), which is operating in the Red Sea, 2/1/1991. Commander Leenhouts.

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USS Philippine Sea (CV-47). Ordnancemen hauling bombs on the carrier's flight deck, preparing planes for attacks on enemy targets in Korea, circa 19 October 1950. A Douglas AD-4 "Skyraider" of Attack Squadron 115 (VA-115) is behind them, with small bombs on its wing racks. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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An Attack Squadron 65 (VA-65) A-6E Intruder aircraft ascends after taking off from NAS, Fallon. The aircraft, armed with Mark 76 practice bombs and an inert-AGM-88 HARM missile, will be taking part in a training sortie against a simulated radar threat environment, 6/14/1993. PH2 Bruce R. Trombecky.

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Western Pacific. An F-14 “Tomcat” aircraft of Fighter Squadron One, VF-1, from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in flight. Photographed by February 1977. Official U.S. Navy photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

I miss the F-4 and the Tomkat, first time I saw the "Blues", they were suited up in Phantoms, it was impressive. I remember crew chief's with bottles of "simple green", spit shining birds, I was about 14 or 15.....

but the 130's at LRAFB did a LAPES drop and a JATO departure, equally impressive!

well, there I go lying again, "damn hell", nothings more impessive than the blues!
 

Air Force Brat

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More aircraft..F-111 aboard USS Coral Sea (CVA 43). This aircraft failed for the US Navy. Too heavy and cumbersome for shipboard operations.


Nice, I remember when the F-111 rolled out for USAF, they had a lot of issues, and some very bad accidents, but this bird eventually went on to distinguish itself with a lot of help...
 

bd popeye

The Last Jedi
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USS Essex (CV 9)..Scene on the flight deck, looking aft from the carrier's island during her shakedown cruise, 20 March 1943. Planes parked on deck are F6F-3 fighters (in foreground, with wings folded) and SBD-4 scout bombers.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-698).

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Underway at 1615 hrs. during May 1943, in position 37 05'N, 74 15'W, as photographed from a blimp from squadron ZP-14. Among the aircraft parked on her flight deck are 24 SBD scout bombers (parked aft), about 11 F6F fighters (parked in after part of the midships area) and about 18 TBF/TBM torpedo planes (parked amidships).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-68097).

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USS Essex (CVA-9) WestPac 1954–55. F9F-6 Cougars from VF-24 "Corsairs" (left) and F2H-3 Banshee from VC-3 Det. A "Blue Nemesis" (right). Note pirate emblem on plane with side number 112.

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In June 1964 Essex took 312 midshipmen for a 7-week training cruise to Europe. Liberty calls were made at Le Havre, France; Copenhagen, Denmark; and Portsmouth, England. Here she is seen in the harbor of Copenhagen, on July 4th, 1964.

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Island of USS Essex (CVS-9), early 1960s.Richard Miller, BMCS, USNR (Ret.)
 

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Belknap was severely damaged in a collision with the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy on 22 November 1975 off the coast of Sicily. A fire broke out on Belknap following the collision, during the fire her aluminum superstructure collapsed after it was weakened by the heat. Seven sailors were killed on Belknap and one on John F. Kennedy.

Shortly after the fire began, boats from other vessels operating with John F. Kennedy and Belknap began to pull alongside the burning ship, often with complete disregard for their own safety. The guided missile destroyer Claude V. Ricketts and destroyer Bordelon moved in on both sides of Belknap, their men directing fire hoses into the amidships area that the stricken ship’s crew could not reach. Bordelon was also badly damaged in a collision with Kennedy the following year which forced her removal from service. Claude V. Ricketts moved in and secured alongside Belknap’s port side, and evacuated the injured while fragments from exploding ammunition showered down upon her weather decks. The frigate Pharris closed in the carrier’s starboard side to provide fire-fighting assistance.[1] Ammunition from Belknap’s three-inch ready storage locker, located amidships, cooked off, hurling fiery fragments into the air and splashing around the rescue boats. Undaunted, the rescuers pulled out the seriously wounded and delivered fire-fighting supplies to the sailors who refused to surrender their ship to the conflagration.

The ammunition ship Mount Baker was involved later in the rescue and salvage of Belknap, escorting her to an ammunition depot and then providing electric and water services as Mount Baker's Explosive Ordnance Disposal team retrieved all of the remaining ammunition from Belknap. Mount Baker also took aboard most of Belknap's crew until they could be transferred to a way station for re-assignment.

The fire and the resultant damage and deaths, which would have been less had Belknap's superstructure been made of steel, helped persuade the US Navy to pursue all-steel construction in future classes of surface combatants.[2] However, in 1987 the New York Times cited cracking in aluminum superstructures such as what occurred in the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates, rather than fire, as the reason the Navy returned to steel on some ships.[3] The first USN combatant ships to revert to all steel superstructure were the Arleigh Burke class, which were commissioned beginning in the 1990s. Belknap was reconstructed by the Philadelphia Navy Yard from 30 January 1976 to 10 May 1980. Since the hull was still in good condition the Navy decided to use this as a test platform for the Aegis class cruiser electronics and updated weapons systems. Until the Aegis class cruisers came along Belknap was one of the most powerful warships in the world and saw service in Beirut as part of the multinational peacekeeping force, becoming the first ship to fire on an enemy since the Vietnam War. It was the ship's Naval Tactical Data Systems' (NTDS) reliability during this time in Beirut which was named as the defining reason that the Belknap was chosen as the Sixth Fleet flagship.

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22Nov 1975 collided at night with USS J.F.Kennedy in the Ionian Sea. Seven crew were killed and 47 injured. Towed in Napoli, after some works al local shipyard the ship was towed at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Where she was repaired. Sunk as target on 24 SEP 1998.

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The U.S. Navy guided missile cruiser USS Belknap (CG-26), flagship of the U.S. 6th Fleet, underway in the Mediterranean Sea on 21 July 1992. Belknap was decommissioned on 15 February 1995.
 
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