Yu-8 Torpedo

Discussion in 'Feedback & Suggestions' started by crobato, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. crobato
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    crobato Colonel
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    Something just came up on Wiki. Being an electrically powered version of the Yu-6, I don't think Yu-8 requires a separate entry for sinodefence but I think it may be worth editing the Yu-6 entry to include it. The thermobaric explosive mentioned may be applicable for both torpedoes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yu-8_torpedo

    Yu-8 (鱼-8) torpedo is developed by China as the electrically powered counterpart of the Chinese Otto fuel II powered Yu-6 torpedo, with which it shares many components and technologies, with the exception of propulsion system.

    Since Otto fuel II powered torpedo cost up to three times of the electrically powered torpedo, Yu-8 torpedo is developed as a cheaper alternative. Very little information is released regarding the torpedo and this new torpedo is shrouded in secrecy. From the very limited information circulating, it is revealed that Yu-8 (鱼-8) torpedo is capable of both ASuW and ASW like Yu-6 torpedo, and it can be launched from a variety of platforms including surface ships, submarines, shore battery, and aircraft. Like all other Chinese torpedoes, Yu-8 torpedo can also be used as part of CAPTOR mine type mine system. Yu-8 torpedo is reportedly the first Chinese torpedo to incorporate wire guidance with optical fiber.

    In 2007, domestic Chinese sources have claimed that Yu-8 torpedo had become the test vehicle and subsequently the first torpedo to be armed with a new warhead that was developed by the Chinese naval research institute. The new warhead utilizes sodium hydride compounds / chemical reaction and once detonated, large amount of sodium powder is released. The chemical reaction of sodium powder and sea water produce huge amount of hydrogen at very high temperature within very short period of time and the within range of several dozen meters, the temperature instantly increased to over two thousand degrees (celsius) as the chemical reactions taken place with hydrogen and oxygen, destroying the target even if no direct hit is scored. During the test in East China Sea, a retired twelve thousand ton ship was hit by two Yu-8 torpedoes on one side, and the side that was hit was completely melted within fifteen minutes.
     
  2. DarkEminence
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    DarkEminence New Member

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    A chemical radical reaction http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_hydride

    This would imply that the warhead is very unstable. Even a slight knick in the warhead exposing it to air would mean a catastrophic explosion. I would hate to be in a ship when one of these things start leaking. I certainly hope that it is not a NaH warhead.
     
  3. Infra_Man99
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    Infra_Man99 Banned Idiot

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    Chemistry and engineering is not that simple. Physical and chemical systems can be installed to prevent premature reactions.

    Off the top of my head:

    1. The torpedo's warhead or container could have an emergency system consisting of buffer solutions to quickly stabilize the warhead if a malfunction/damage occurs. The emergency system is removed prior to launching the torpedo.

    2. The torpedo's warhead consists of two or more parts (the reactants). Only when the two or more parts are put together is the warhead dangerous. The two parts are placed in emergency systems (see #1) for storage, but combined prior to launching the torpedo.

    3. The warhead is built physically tough and mechanically safe.


    Look at nuclear engines in surface ships and submarines. Look at fully loaded bombers and attack jets flying through a SAM or flak infested region. Look at infantry/tanks carrying lots of explosives while being shot at. Things are not as simple as a single chemistry reaction.
     
  4. Pointblank
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    Pointblank Senior Member

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    Yet a simple chemical reaction destroyed the Kursk...
     
  5. Infra_Man99
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    Infra_Man99 Banned Idiot

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    Yes, that is true, but the other half of the Kursk story was negligence or poor training or lack of funds. Accidents do happen. The key is making accidents a rare event, not the norm, and if accidents do happen, minimize the damage. So far, the US military has been good at that. Russia has been good at that, too, not as good as the US (from what I have read). However, both armies do have rare accidents, as well as the Chinese army.

    So far, I have not read the Chinese navy having a significant problem with prematurely exploding Yu-8 warheads, but then armies are secretive.
     
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