Who do you admire?

Discussion in 'Members' Club Room' started by Obcession, Dec 11, 2005.

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Who do you admire?

  1. Sir Winston Churchill

    4 vote(s)
    16.0%
  2. Joseph Stalin

    2 vote(s)
    8.0%
  3. Past US presidents (too many to list, but you can specify)

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  4. Mao ZeDong

    6 vote(s)
    24.0%
  5. Otto Von Bismarck

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  6. Alexander III

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  7. Hannibal Barca

    3 vote(s)
    12.0%
  8. Julius Caesar

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  9. Joan of Arc

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  10. Zhu Ge Liang

    3 vote(s)
    12.0%
  11. Lenin

    2 vote(s)
    8.0%
  1. MIGleader
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    MIGleader Banned Idiot

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    or the doctor that prescribed hitlers medicine was insame. he kept hitler high with a load of drugs, so i guess thats why hitler was insane. he might have had siphilis too.
     
  2. Soyuz
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    Soyuz New Member

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    Yeah i think he had some sort of obcession with this didn't he have a whole chapter in Mein Kampf on the topic of siphilis.

    true but also if he hadn't based his ideology on racist nationalism he may have succeeded in taking russia and perhaps have won the war. Initially in the Ukraine etc the Germans were welcomed by many who detested stalin however those under occupation soon realised that life under german occupation would be worse (due to the wehrmacht's horrific treatment of the so called sub-human slavs) than stalins tyranny.

    As for stalin he was clearly a paranoid maniac who trusted nobody not even himself as i believe he once remarked! indeed when the germans first attacked he refused to believe that hitler would launch an attack at this early stage and he refused to allow his forces to fight back against the nazis until a number of hours later!

    However it has been argued that the terror he exposed the soviet people to before the war toughened them and helped them survive the harsh conditions of the german occupation.
     
  3. sumdud
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    sumdud Senior Member
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    May I ask? Why'd you pick Guderian really?
    It's just ironic that Guderian was picked even though his tactics were stolen.

    No offence though.
    ----
    We can thank Hitler to his stomach problems.
     
  4. sadim81
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    sadim81 New Member

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    Hi all, being a navy freak, I would have to give my vote to Admiral Zheng He (1371-1433), without doubt the greatest explorer in Chinese history. :china:
    [​IMG]
    Zheng He was a muslim eunach who served under Emperor Zhu Di (Yongle), third Emperor of the Ming Dynasty. The great Admiral made a total of 7 lengendary voyages of discovery from 1405 - 1433 that saw trade and chinese influence spread to South East asia(as far south as modern day Sumatra, Indonesia), to Arabia(including the Red Sea up to Egypt) & to the east coast of Africa(as far south as the Mozmbique Channel).

    What I admire most about Admiral Zheng He was his courage, navigational & logistical skills in keeping his massive treasure fleets (average over 300 ships and 30 000 men!!! including soldiers, merchants, embassadors, translators, astronomists, botanists and of course prostitutes) operational over vasts unknown, uncharted distances for years at a time. He explored, he traded, he conquered! (sounds like an advert for Civ 4 or somethin...)

    How different would the world be if we did not burn all his maps and his ships when he returned?! we could have ruled South East Asia, Australia and Africa 500 yrs ago, as it is we wouldn't have a blue water navy again for another 600 yrs!!!

    P.S. Have any of you read 1421 - The year China Discovered America by Gavin Menzies? although I don't agree with its findings that the Admiral reached America, its still an interesting read and he does raise some good points. For a more historical look at the great Ming fleets see Louise Levathes' "When China Ruled the Seas: The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, 1405-1433"
     
    #44 sadim81, Dec 16, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2005
  5. Vytautas
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    Vytautas Junior Member

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    Why i picked guderian?Because he was smart enough to sistemise those ideas into one single doctrine and convince hitler of its effectivness.He also added some of his own ideas like attacking enemy communications and destroying their morale.Other blitzkrieg concepts didnt include that,so i have to say that its pretty much his own archievment.As a former radioman of WW1 he realised the importance of proper communication between units and insisted that proper radio equipment is crucial to victory.And he was so right!If a french officer needed artillery he had to fill a petition and send it to his commander,while the germans could recieve quick "on demand" support.
     
    #45 Vytautas, Dec 16, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2005
  6. MIGleader
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    MIGleader Banned Idiot

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    zheng he is a great admiral. i beilieve he came within 80 miles of new york in one vyage. probaby the eastern version of magellen, columbus, or francis drake.

    why isnt constatine on there? perhaps there should be a section ofr voting on past roman emporers, which can be specified in a post.
     
  7. ger_mark
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    ger_mark Junior Member

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    [​IMG]

    Heinz Guderian was born in 1888 at Kulm. He was educated in Prussia and in 1908 gained a commission in the German Army. He served as an infantry officer. From 1914 to 1917, Guderian served in Flanders and would have experienced the lack of mobility first hand that existed on the Western Front. He would also have been acutely aware of the carnage that took place on the Western Front. Guderian joined the General Staff and by the end of the war, he had developed a specialised knowledge in motorised transport.

    Guderian concentrated his idea on developing a highly mobile mechanised army. He wrote "Actung Panzer" which came to the attention of Hitler. This was Guderian’s plan to make war mobile by having a force that was consistently moving forward, never giving the enemy the time to regroup etc. From July 1934, Guderian was given the task by Hitler of perfecting the fighting techniques of the Panzers – light tanks, supported by infantry and planes – which was to become the legendary Blitzkrieg mode of attacking an enemy.

    Guderian faced numerous obstacles within the Wehrmacht’s hierarchy. He was told that an attack on Belgium and France would falter because of the river systems that flowed through the region. How could tanks cross rivers – especially the wide River Meuse?

    Guderian’s plan included the use of specialist engineering units that could assemble pontoon bridges quickly that could take the weight of tanks and supporting vehicles. In this way, his Panzer units crossed rivers with ease – and those senior commanders who had failed to support Guderian in the development of his idea, had to admit that they were wrong. A Blitzkrieg attack could also include the use of paratroopers.

    It was Blitzkrieg that resulted in the Allies being pushed back to Dunkirk and the initial success of the huge attack on the Soviet Union that was Operation Barbarossa, was also based on Blitzkrieg. For the attack on Russia, Guderian was in charge of the Second Panzer Army.

    Ironically, it was the failure of Blitzkrieg to deliver a knockout blow in Russia that led to Hitler sacking Guderian at the end of 1941. However, Hitler reinstated him in 1943 as the Inspector General of Armoured Troops and after the July Bomb Plot of 1944, Guderian became Chief of the General Staff.

    Such a resurrection of a military career under Hitler was rare but Hitler himself had experienced the horrors of trench warfare in World War One, and the relationship he had with Guderian was usually a positive one as Guderian had been the man to bring mobility to the Wehrmacht. In response to Hitler’s treatment of him, Guderian remained loyal to Hitler and accepted his dismissal from the positions he held on March 28th 1945, when it was clear that he was incapable of preventing the Russians from occupying Berlin.

    Guderian died in 1954 aged 66.
     
  8. patriot
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    patriot New Member

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    Some even say that he reached America but the key thing is he was involved in the power struggle and led to the killing of a emperor and explored the world because he thought the emperor might have went oversee since his body was never found:china:
     

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