USMC says MV-22 Osprey ready for duty

Discussion in 'World Armed Forces' started by bd popeye, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Looks like the first squadron will be in MCAS Cherry Point NC by
    2007..Oh boy. Would you gents take a ride in one? Is it really safe?
    I know the USMC had them at sea on the USS Bataan in June for final
    test. Do you guys think it is ready to go? Check it out!

    http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=25391

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/military/20050928-1544-cnsosprey.html

    Osprey clears last hurdle to operational use

    By Otto Kreisher
    COPLEY NEWS SERVICE

    3:44 p.m. September 28, 2005

    WASHINGTON – More than two decades after the Marine Corps selected
    it as a replacement for its Vietnam-vintage helicopters, the MV-22
    Osprey on Wednesday cleared the final hurdle for high-quantity
    production and eventual combat deployment.
    The intervening years have been marred by major design and
    manufacturing mistakes, extensive program delays, multiple
    cancellation threats and three tragic accidents that killed 30
    Marines and contractor personnel.

    But after considerable systems changes and a comprehensive although
    belated test program, the Defense Acquisition Board approved "full-
    rate production" for the controversial tilt-rotor troop transport.

    The clearance from the board led by the Pentagon's top acquisition
    official, Assistant Defense Secretary Kenneth Krieg, followed the
    earlier declaration by the Pentagon's top weapons tester that the
    Osprey had proven itself operationally suitable and effective during
    extensive trials this spring.

    The Marines want to buy 360 MV-22s to carry troops and cargo, the
    Air Force wants 50 of a modified version, the CV-22, for its Special
    Operations Command, and the Navy might buy 48 to conduct search and
    rescue missions and move people and supplies.

    The Marines have fought to keep the Osprey program going through all
    the difficult years because of its unique capability. It can take
    off and land like a helicopter, but by tilting its rotors forward it
    can fly like a turboprop airplane, nearly twice as fast and three
    times as far as any helicopter.

    The acquisition board's decision will permit the Pentagon in future
    years to buy more Ospreys than the "minimum sustaining rate" of 11 a
    year that the Bell-Boeing manufacturing team has produced since the
    program was restarted in 2002. The annual production has been split
    between nine for the Marines and two for the Air Force.

    The Navy now expects to buy 14 for the Marines in 2007, increasing
    to 38 in 2011. But that rate of increase already is much slower than
    previously planned, mainly because of the higher cost of each
    aircraft, currently $71 million, which is more than twice the price
    predicted when the program started.

    The Navy program manager and the manufacturers have promised to
    bring the cost down to $58 million each once high-rate production
    starts. Reaching that lower price could determine the long-range
    fate of the Osprey, which still has a large cadre of opponents in
    Congress and among defense critics.

    The future production rate will determine how fast the Marines can
    begin forming MV-22 squadrons and retiring the badly aged CH-46E and
    CH-53D helicopters that the Osprey is intended to replace.

    After completion of the demanding three-month operational evaluation
    in June, the Marines began shifting aircraft and trained pilots and
    crewmen to the Osprey training squadron at Marine Corps Air Station
    Cherry Point, N.C. The Marines hope to have their first squadron
    ready for deployment in 2007.

    The first Osprey squadron at Miramar Marine Corps Air Station could
    be in place by 2012, if the Marines can buy enough MV-22s
     
  2. drunkhomer
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    drunkhomer Junior Member

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    i thought da program was cancelled due to many numbers of test crashes

    oh and btw bd popeye... Falcons all da way!!!
     
  3. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Almost. It certainly was considered because of the crashes and all the other problems. It took 20 years to get this aircrfat right.

    Falcons? Micheal Vick? Over rated..but still exciting.
     
  4. MadMax
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    MadMax Junior Member

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    most of the crashes happened because the operating procedures hadnt been compleatly laid out, the pilots tried to land them like helicopters but you have to decend more carfully then in a helo besides the us sunk to much money in the program to cancle it
     
  5. swimmerXC
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    swimmerXC Unregistered
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    how long have the MV-22s been around? i remember it being around for a while.... but ti jsut entered service?
     
  6. PiSigma
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    PiSigma "the engineer"

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    i thought it entered service for awhile, then because of all the accidents, they had to basically bring it back to the drawing board. but this is a sweet design, it's definitly something helo designs should follow. wait another 20 years, maybe they can come up with a jet version of the osprey.
     
  7. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    The program was authorized in 1981. the first ones flew around 1986??? Not sure...

    A jet engine in a helo?? Of course. A turboprop is a jet . It just has rotors or propelers attached.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/jvx.htm
     
  8. sumdud
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    sumdud Senior Member
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    I thought the engines were more of chopper engines on pivots than a turbo-prop. The shape of it says. What'll happen if you replace those with a turbo-something engine?
     
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