US Fleet Carriers from Langley to Ford Class

Discussion in 'Military History' started by FORBIN, Jul 27, 2015.

  1. FORBIN
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    FORBIN Lieutenant General
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  2. FORBIN
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    FORBIN Lieutenant General
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  3. Jeff Head
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    I changed the name to US Fleet carriers...otherwise we would have to add a LOT more Escort and Jeep carriers to the mix.
     
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  4. Jeff Head
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    Over the next few days, I will list pics of all of the US Navy Fleet carriers...five at a time. Here's the first five:

    01-Langley.jpg
    USS Langley, CV-1, Commission: Apr 1913 Decom: Feb 1942 Disposition: Sunk

    02-Lexington.jpg
    USS Lexington, CV-2, Commission: Dec 1927 Decom: May 1942 Disposition: Sunk

    03-Saratoga.jpg
    USS Saratoga, CV-3, Commission: Nov 1927 Decom: Aug 1946 Disposition: SinkEx 1946

    04-Ranger.jpg
    USS Ranger, CV-4, Commission: Jun 1934 Decom: Oct 1946 Disposition: Scrap 1947

    05-Yorktown.jpg
    USS Yorktown, CV-5 Commission: Sep 1937 Decom: Jun 1942 Disposition: Sunk

    Of these first five, three were sunk by Japanese forces in World War II (two were scuttled), one was sunk in a US Navy SINKEX in 1946, and the last, the USS Ranger, was scrapped in 1947.
     
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    06-Enterprise.jpg USS Enterprise, CV-6, Commission: May 1938 Decom: Feb 1947 Disposition: Scrap 1959

    07-Wasp.jpg
    USS Wasp, CV-7, Commission: Apr 1940 Decom: Sep 1942 Disposition: Sunk

    08-Hornet.jpg
    USS Hornet, CV-8, Commission:Oct 1941: May 1938 Decom: Oct 1942 Disposition: Sunk

    09-Essex.jpg
    USS Essex, CV-9 Commission: Dec 1942 Decom: June 1969 Disposition: Scrap 1975

    10-Yorktown.jpg
    USS Yorktown, CV-10, Commission: Apr 1943 Decom: June 1970 Disposition: Museum

    Of the eight fleet carriers commissioned by the US Navy before World War II started, five were sunk by the Japanese.

    The USS Enterprise, CV-6, was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for her service during World War II.

    The citation states:

    In addition, Enterprise received the Navy Unit Commendation and 20 battle stars for World War II service, making her the most highly decorated US combat ship in history.

    The Essex class (along with the Midway Class) were the ones that after World War II were modernized and ultimately received angled decks and operated jet aircraft off of.
     
    #5 Jeff Head, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
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  6. FORBIN
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    All CV were sunk in 1942, CVL/CVE some after and Mister Big E which in part in almost all the battles the survivor of those took place around Guadalcanal.

    Some Essex build in 18 months ! worck 24/24 ! World record for big Combat ships.
     
    #6 FORBIN, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
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  7. Jeff Head
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    Yes...the US Navy lost five of its first eight carrier in 1942 alone. That looked pretty grim at the time...but was less grim because of the huge victory at Midway.

    But the US even more carriers thereafter, though no more fleet carriers. Since they are not fleet carriers they will not be included on this thread in terms of full detail and pics.

    One was a light carrier. Purpose built carriers developed on a light cruiser hull.

    Princeton, CVl-23, was sunk in 1944. She displaced about 15,000 tons full load.

    Numerous escort carriers were lost. These were built on merchant man hulls and had little military grade protection in terms of damage control, water tight integrity. etc. Each of these displaced about 11,000 tons full load. The list includes.

    Liscome Bay, CVE-56, sunk in 1943
    Block Island, CVE-21, sunk in 1944, the only carrier loss to the Germans (U-Boat)
    Gambier Bay, CVE-72, sunk in 1944 (Battle off Samar)
    St. Lo, CVE-63, sunk in 1944 (Battle off Samar)
    Ommaney Bay, CVE-79, sunk in 1945
    BIsmark sea, CVE-05, sunk in 1945, the last US carrier loss in combat, off Iwo Jima

    So after those five carriers in 1942, the US lost the following thereafter:

    1 was sunk in 1943
    4 were sunk in 1944
    2 were sunk in 1945

    The US Navy lost a total of 12 carriers in World War II.
     
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    11-Intrepid.jpg
    CV-11 Intrepid Commissioned: Aug 1943 Decomm: Mar 1974 Disposition: Museum

    12-Hornet.jpg
    CV-12 Hornet Commissioned: Nov 1943 Decomm: Jun 1970 Disposition: Museum

    13-Franklin.jpg
    CV-13 Franklin Commissioned: Jan 1944 Decomm: Feb 1947 Disposition: Scrap 1966

    13-Franklina.jpg
    Franklin was severely damaged 50 miles off the Japanese coast on 1945. She would certainly have sunk but for the heroic damage control efforts of her crew (including two medal of honor recipients). She lost over 800 killed and 480 injured, the most of any surviving US warship in World War II, and second only to the USS Arizona. She was ultimately towed away from the battle zone and repaired. I recommend the book, "INFERNO: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II. Amazing story.

    14-Ticodneroga.jpg
    CV-14 Ticonderoga Commissioned: May 1944 Decomm: Sep 1973 Disposition: Scrap 1975
     
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    15-Randolph.jpg
    CV-15 Randolp Commissioned: Oct 1944 Decomm: Feb 1969 Disposition: Scrap 1975
     
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    16-Lexington.jpg
    CV-16 Lexington Commissioned: Feb 1943 Decomm: Nov 1991 Disposition: Museum

    17-Bunker Hill.jpg
    CV-17 Bunker Hill Commissioned: May 1943 Decomm: Jan 1947 Disposition: Scrap 1973

    18-Wasp.jpg
    CV-18 Wasp Commissioned: Noov 1943 Decomm: Jul 1972 Disposition: Scrap 1973

    19-Hancock.jpg
    CV-19 Hancock Commissioned: Apr 1944 Decomm: Jan 1976 Disposition: Scrap 1976

    20-Bennington.jpg
    CV-20 Bennington Commissioned: Jan 1944 Decomm: Jan 1970 Disposition: Scrap 1994
     
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