The J-7 and older PLAAF aircraft

Discussion in 'Air Force' started by adeptitus, May 26, 2006.

  1. adeptitus
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    adeptitus Senior Member

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    From SinoDefense:

    http://www.sinodefence.com/airforce/uav/j5.asp
    A Chinese licensed copy of the Soviet MiG-17 (NATO codename: Fresco), the J-5 is China’s first indigenously built jet fighter aircraft. A total of 767 examples have been built by Shenyang Aircraft Industry Company (SAC) between 1956 and 1959. The aircraft was completely retired from active service with the PLAAF and PLANAF in the 1980s, while its fighter-trainer variant JJ-5 is still flying as a primary jet trainer.

    http://www.sinodefence.com/airforce/trainer/jj5.asp
    Following the successful development of the J-5 fighter, a Chinese copy of the Soviet MiG-17 Fresco, the newly founded Chengdu Aircraft Factory began to develop the two-seat variant JJ-5 to replace the PLAAF’s Soviet-made MiG-15UTI Midget fighter-trainer for jet fighter pilot training. The maiden flight of the JJ-5 took place on 8 May 1966, and the aircraft entered service with the PLAAF in December 1966. A total of 974 examples were built before the production stopped in 1983. The aircraft is operated by the PLA Air Force (PLAAF), PLA Naval Air Force (PLANAF), as well as some third-world countries.


    From Air to Air Combat web page:
    http://www.airtoaircombat.com/background.asp?id=41&bg=856
    The MiG-17 was license-built in both China and Poland. In the early 1950s, the PLAAF obtained a number of Soviet-built MiG-17 Fresco-A day fighters, designated "J-4" or, when passed on to other countries, "F-4". The Chinese obtained plans for the MiG-17F Fresco-C day fighter in 1955, along with two completed pattern aircraft, 15 knockdown kits, and parts for ten aircraft. The first Chinese-built MiG-17F, produced by the Shenyang factory, performed its initial flight on 19 July 1956 with test pilot Wu Keming at the controls. The MiG-17F was known as the "J-5" in Chinese service, or "F-5" when it was exported. One was actually trialed as a torpedo bomber, but not surprisingly the concept never made it into formal service.

    The Chinese then went on to produce the MiG-17PF interceptor as the "J-5A (F-5A)". Plans were obtained in 1961, but the country was in turmoil in the early 1960s and the first Chinese-built MiG-17PF, produced at the Chengdu factory, didn't fly until 1964, when the type was basically obsolete. It was given the designation of "J-5A (F-5A)". A total of 767 J-5s and J-5As were built to end of production in 1969.


    Somewhat more practically, the Chinese built a two-seat trainer version of the MiG-17, designated the "JJ-5 (FT-5)". It was something of a hybrid, featuring the cockpit system of the MiG-15UTI / JJ-2, the non-afterburning VK-1A engine of the MiG-17 Fresco-A, and the larger airbrakes of the MiG-17F. It also had a protruding upper intake lip resembling that of the MiG-17PF, but the JJ-5 wasn't fitted with radar. All the nose armament was deleted, with the aircraft carrying a single NR-23 cannon in a belly pack. First flight was in 1968, with the type built at the Chengdu factory.

    About 1,061 JJ-5s were built to end of production in 1986, with the type exported to a number of countries. Some sources have referred to it as a "MiG-17UTI", but formally speaking there never was an aircraft with that designation.


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    Possible areas of correction:

    * On our Sinodefense web site, the J-5 UAV page claimes that 767 J-5 and J-5A were built between 1956 and 1959. I think it's very unlikely that they'd make 767 aircraft in 3-4 years?? The air to air combat page claims the production period was from 1956 to 1969, with J-5A production running from ~1964 to 1969. I think that number is prolly more realistic.

    * On the Sinodefense web page for JJ-5, it says a total of 974 were built between 1966 to 1983. On air to air combat, it claims 1,061 up until 1986.

    I'm not sure whos numbers are correct, but will do some more research into this.
     
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  2. Dongfeng
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    Dongfeng Junior Member

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    I was wrong in the first part. It should end 1969 not 1959. What happened is that the J-5 production was stopped in May 1959 temporary and then resumed in 1960.

    As to the second part, I got the figure of 974 and 1983 from a Chinese website: http://air.xuexue.net/pla/jt5.htm . Like you said I need more research too
     
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  3. Semi-Lobster
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    Semi-Lobster Junior Member

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    I thought a proper thread to discuss the older and (mostly) retired aircraft of the PLAAF and PLANAF was in order, hopefully this thread can be a hub of discussion for older aircraft.

    So here's my first question. A lot of sites talk about the 'J-4' but from what I understand that the J-4 designation was never used. Was I wrong or are there just a lot of incorrect info floating around? Secondly I'm having trouble getting more information on the J-3 and J-2... I know they exist but finding sites on them in English or Chinese is kind of hard (they all re-direct to speculation pages on the J-13 and J-14) Also, who buit these aircraft, were they all imported from Russia? Also, I assume there was never a J-1 because I've never heard of it being mentioned.

    Secondly, does anybody have any information on the 'Shenyang FT-1' http://www.sac.com.cn/eng/military/FT-1.htm ? Did it ever enter production?

    Thirdly a question about the cancelled Nanchang (now Hongdu) J-12. Does anybody have a site detailing its history of development? I know it was mean't to meet a PLAAF requirement for a light, STOL, but, it was only 10 metres long! It seems like a fighter designed from another era with more in common with the Folland Gnat than the F-5.
     
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  4. crobato
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    crobato Senior Member

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    The J-5 was the first jet fighter China actually started to produce. That would be the MiG-17. Prior to that, MiG-15s had all been imported, but none domestically produced.

    The first jet fighter ever imported to China and wore the PLAAF insignia was the MiG-9. That was based on a secret project Messerschmitt concocted in the closing days of World War II. A few of these aircraft are still in some museums in China.
     
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  5. Semi-Lobster
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    Semi-Lobster Junior Member

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    So the MiG-17 was the first Chinese built jet fighter and before that the designation of imported Soviet aircraft was not changed? Also wasn't the Yakovlev Yak-17 also imported as well to China?

    I'm still trying to figure out what this jet trainer is based on. It seems to be a specificly purpose built jet trainer which is certainly something the Soviet Union never did. From what I've read, it was a completely indigenously designed aircraft amazingly enough but it seems beyond one built it never really entered service it seems.
     
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  6. crobato
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    crobato Senior Member

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    The SAC jet seems completely indigenous and yet I never heard of it until now. I guess they don't show a lot of stuff until now. That certainly makes it the first Chinese indigenous jet. Originally I thought SAC's J-12 of 1966 was the first indigenous Chinese jet. Now make that the first supersonic jet.
     
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  7. Semi-Lobster
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    Semi-Lobster Junior Member

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    The Chinese designation for the 'FT-1' seems to be JJ-1. It seems that the Chinese don't really talk much about it except in passing. I still can't figure what happened, either the prototype crashed or there was a revised training system for fighter aircraft and the JJ-1 did not meet the requirements
     
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  8. Semi-Lobster
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    Semi-Lobster Junior Member

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    A while back I thought I read somewhere that the Bangladeshi F-7BGs are BVR capable and were armed with MRAAMs but recently I have read another article saying that its nearly identical to the J-7G in terms of avionics and only has a range of about 30km, and is armed with only short range missiles. Is this correct?
     
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  9. yehe
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    yehe New Member

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    Actually I think SAC did produced J4 as well, which is Mig 15
     
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  10. Semi-Lobster
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    Semi-Lobster Junior Member

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    So did the J-4 exist or did it not exist? I'm still confused over this
     
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