Z-20


Figaro

Junior Member
Registered Member
And applying your logic, where in the Globaltimes article that you linked can I find the photographs by which you have "definitively identified the Z-20's engines by outward appearance"?

Anyway, let's try this again. Read the following paragraph carefully, then answer the question after the paragraph:


Question: what engine does J-20A use?
Well we wouldn't need picture confirmation now would we since we have the Global Times article? Any how, why don't you answer the question I posed in my previous response (which happens to use your very same logic)? I have answered your question and now it is time for you to answer mine.

Question : In the final design of the J-20, it is supposed to be powered by the WS-15. Does it mean that current J-20s should be powered by the WS-15 because they are production types? How do we know definitively that the Z-20 in its current form is its final design?
 

by78

Brigadier
Well we wouldn't need picture confirmation now would we since we have the Global Times article? Any how, why don't you answer the question I posed in my previous response (which happens to use your very same logic)?

Question : In the final design of the J-20, it is supposed to be powered by the WS-15. Does it mean that current J-20s should be powered by the WS-15 because they are production types?
The current J-20As are powered by an improved variant of the domestic WS-10 turbofan.

Back to my question. Read the following paragraph carefully, then answer the question after the paragraph:
The exact type of engine used on the first prototype J-20 (#2001) is unclear (Russian AL-31?). The J-20 #2001 prototype made its first flight at the Chengdu airfield on 11 January, 2011. J-20 has entered service with PLAAF in 2016, a time frame much faster than the one (>2020) anticipated by western military analysts. The latest image (October 2019) suggests that J-20A powered by the indigenous WS-10C turbofan with a serrated (sawtooth) nozzle design is in production. It was rumored that the indigenous WS-15 turbofan engine has been selected for J-20.
Question: what engine does J-20A use?
 

Figaro

Junior Member
Registered Member
The current J-20As are powered by an improved variant of the domestic WS-10 turbofan.

Back to my question. Read the following paragraph carefully, then answer the question after the paragraph:


Question: what engine does J-20A use?
Whoa whoa whoa but shouldn't it be powered by the WS-15 because it should be finalized after all since it is a production model right? This the exact same logic you applied earlier with the Z-20. Anyways didn't you just answer your own question ;)?

Huitong was talking about the "final design" of the Z-20, not its first prototype. In this final design, Z-20 is powered by domestic WZ-10 turboshafts. What is unclear about that?
 

by78

Brigadier
Whoa whoa whoa but shouldn't it be powered by the WS-15 because it should be finalized after all since it is a production model right? This the exact same logic you applied earlier with the Z-20. Anyways didn't you just answer your own question ;)?
The final unnamed J-20 variant will be powered by WS-15, if it goes well. The current J-20A is confirmed to have a WS-10 variant, while the WS-15 is being developed.

Shall we try this again?
The exact type of engine used on the first prototype J-20 (#2001) is unclear (Russian AL-31?). The J-20 #2001 prototype made its first flight at the Chengdu airfield on 11 January, 2011. J-20 has entered service with PLAAF in 2016, a time frame much faster than the one (>2020) anticipated by western military analysts. The latest image (October 2019) suggests that J-20A powered by the indigenous WS-10C turbofan with a serrated (sawtooth) nozzle design is in production. It was rumored that the indigenous WS-15 turbofan engine has been selected for J-20.
Question: what engine does J-20A use?
 

Figaro

Junior Member
Registered Member
The final unnamed J-20 variant will be powered by WS-15, if it goes well. The current J-20A is confirmed to have a WS-10 variant, while the WS-15 is being developed.

Shall we try this again?


Question: what engine does J-20A use?
Lol why are you ignoring my previous quote. It's really a charm SDF does not allow you to delete messages, unlike a certain "fanboy" forum you always snide about. Anyways please clarify this statement below. Did Huitong say that the current Z-20s in production are of "final design"? Regarding your question, you already answered it yourself.
Huitong was talking about the "final design" of the Z-20, not its first prototype. In this final design, Z-20 is powered by domestic WZ-10 turboshafts. What is unclear about that?
 

by78

Brigadier
Whoa whoa whoa but shouldn't it be powered by the WS-15 because it should be finalized after all since it is a production model right? This the exact same logic you applied earlier with the Z-20. Anyways didn't you just answer your own question ;)?
Let me simplify this further, since you don't appear to understand analogies.

Read the following paragraph carefully and answer the question after the paragraph.
The project (now designated as
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) finally gained full speed after Z-10 was put into production in 2010. The finalized design of Z-20 called for the domestic WZ-10 turboshaft engines to be installed. The first prototype was rumored to have rolled off the assembly line in December 2012. Because the intended WZ-10 engine was still in development and not yet ready, the first prototype was equipped with a foreign engine the type of which remains unclear (Russian TV3-117VM?). Z-20 has entered active-service with PLA Army in 2019 and is powered by two
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turboshaft engines (~1,600kW). It is rumored that the indigenous WZ-11 turboshaft engine (1,500kW) has been selected as an additional engine option, but this has not been confirmed.
Question: what engine does the current active-service Z-20 have?

P.S. Have you taken either the ACT or the SAT? If so, may I ask what year and your score?
 
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