Type 09V/09VI (095/096) Nuclear Submarine Thread


Tam

Brigadier
Registered Member
ballast tanks won’t be on the top of the hull in either single or double hull submarines. if it were it would be difficult to flood quickly to dive the boat quickly, and it would reduce the boat’s stability when underwater.

on Every submarine, the ballast tanks are situated so that they will be almost completely underwater even when the submarine is fully surfaced. this allows the ballast tanks to be flooded quickly by simply opening doors on the bottom of it if the submarine has to dive quickly. It also allow the ballast tanks to provide buoyancy to the submarine even on the surface when it is fully blown

On modern single hull nuclear submarines the ballast tanks are between the hydrodynamic bow snd stern casings and the pressure hull. The fact that forward ballast tank is At the front end of the boat, and below water even when the sun rains at the surface, is how so many modern submarines can get away with mounting their forward dive planes above water when the submarine is on the surface

Ballast tanks should wrap around the sub on front, center and tail sections.

download (2).png12-2_Fig-3.jpgHASW 3 Tanks.gif

The top should free flood.


The forward ballast tank would be between the bow and the front of the pressure hull which is exactly indicated by the thick limber hole line in this photograph.

51198856691_7d4454720c_k.jpg51198857081_b7cd3510d6_k (1).jpg51199917705_c869e88652_k.jpg

The hump would then be a free flood area, with all the holes allowing the water to get in and drain out.

The back of the submarine you have this other limber line here which are the holes for the rear ballast tank. There are going to be holes on the bottom where the water comes in, while the holes on the top are where the air gets out.

There is second limber line on the center of the submarine underneath the drainage holes for the hump, and that might be for the center ballast tank. In that sense, the 094 already looks like a hybrid. The 093A also has the forward, middle and aft limber lines that indicates where the ballast tanks are.
 

Richard Santos

Senior Member
Registered Member
how high the submarine rides in the water while surfaces is not a direct function of whether the submarine is single or double hulled.

It is a matter of how much reserve buoyancy the navy wants in her submarines, and whether the operational doctrine call for the ballast tanks to be fully blown when the submarine is riding or the surface, or call for ballast tanks to only be partially blown in normal operation, reserving additional bouyancy for emergencies.

Generally the Russian submarines are given very high level of reserve bouyancy, while western submarines make do with much less. High amount of reserve bouyancy enhances safety, but makes the submarine more bulky.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
how high the submarine rides in the water while surfaces is not a direct function of whether the submarine is single or double hulled.

It is a matter of how much reserve buoyancy the navy wants in her submarines, and whether the operational doctrine call for the ballast tanks to be fully blown when the submarine is riding or the surface, or call for ballast tanks to only be partially blown in normal operation, reserving additional bouyancy for emergencies.

Generally the Russian submarines are given very high level of reserve bouyancy, while western submarines make do with much less. High amount of reserve bouyancy enhances safety, but makes the submarine more bulky.
I think Tam may be following HI Sutton and the criteria that he applies for evaluating foreign Submarines. And in this case, I think H I S definitely has better grasp of that subject than most people.
 

Orthan

Junior Member
Are you seeing something special in these photos? posting photos without saying anything about it doesnt help much.
 

blindsight

Junior Member
Registered Member
how high the submarine rides in the water while surfaces is not a direct function of whether the submarine is single or double hulled.

It is a matter of how much reserve buoyancy the navy wants in her submarines, and whether the operational doctrine call for the ballast tanks to be fully blown when the submarine is riding or the surface, or call for ballast tanks to only be partially blown in normal operation, reserving additional bouyancy for emergencies.

Generally the Russian submarines are given very high level of reserve bouyancy, while western submarines make do with much less. High amount of reserve bouyancy enhances safety, but makes the submarine more bulky.
Double-hulled design means inherently higher reserve buoyancy, doesn't it?
 

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