Type 055 DDG Large Destroyer Thread


taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
Because there's "a certain loose end" that in the shape of Taiwan Island, thus they can't drop the "People's Liberation" from the title yet.

Actually, for a short time post-1949, the PLA changed its title to "National Defense Force" (國防軍) but not long after decided to reinstate the "People's Liberation Army" because there's that loose end aka Taiwan and seems like (and proven so) will be quite sometime before that can be resolved, thus they need something to remind themselves the mission is not yet complete.

Thus, to stay in-topic, is the reason why Chinese Navy's ship full name is such a mouthful.

C'mon, one way or the other "China" is part of the official title. Plus, "Chinese Navy" (中国海军)is a title that PLAN has been using with increased frequency since the last decade.

And as usual, official photographers have a knack to make their ships looks smaller than they really are...
The two points that you make are shockingly surprising to me. Do you mind elaborate on how you get this?
  1. I am old and have many relatives in the military some have served as early as the 1960s. I have never heard such things especially that PLA was officially named "National Defense Force" for whatever length of time.
  2. "Chinese Navy" is a English phrase, not a official title in English. It is like calling Xi Jingping Chinese president, but his official title remains Chairman of PRC in English. Just because somebody choose that English phrase in the English newspaper does not mean anything.
 

stannislas

Junior Member
Registered Member
"Chinese Navy" is a English phrase, not a official title in English. It is like calling Xi Jingping Chinese president, but his official title remains Chairman of PRC in English. Just because somebody choose that English phrase in the English newspaper does not mean anything.
Just copy from wiki:

The official English-language
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of the title was "
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"; after 1982, this translation was changed to "
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", although the Chinese title remains unchanged.
 

taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
Just copy from wiki:

The official English-language
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of the title was "
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"; after 1982, this translation was changed to "
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
", although the Chinese title remains unchanged.
Here is the section of wiki that you referred to.

The official English-language
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of the title was "
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"; after 1982, this translation was changed to "
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", although the Chinese title remains unchanged.
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Here is note 2

In
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the President of the PRC is termed zhǔxí while the Presidents of other countries are termed zǒngtǒng. Furthermore zhǔxí continues to have the meaning of "chairman" in a generic context. Incidentally, the President of the ROC is termed zǒngtǒng.


So who used the term "president" when and where? The statement only referred to note 2. Neither of them give a reference of China used the term "president" in formal correspondence.

Remember wiki is nothing until it quotes a verifiable official source, such as the English version of a treaty or agreement in which Xi Jinping signed his name under the word "President of People's Republic of China". I am willing to wait and see for that.

The bottom line is that, only the Chinese name is the official name. Rendition in any other language is just a word that anybody such as journalist may choose at will except if it is on a paper of legal status. For example, Soviet Premier were translated to either "Premier" or "President of the console of ministers" in English, which is official? And who decides?
 
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taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
It's literally "China Navy", not Chinese Navy, meaning the country, not the people. Official name is China people's liberation army navy.
No, in English Chinese means 1. Chinese people and 2. "China's" or "of China". So it is "Chinese Navy" if you want a proper English translation. Same goes to "British Navy" and "German Navy". Here British and German are not the people but the states.
 

kentchang

Junior Member
Registered Member
No, in English Chinese means 1. Chinese people and 2. "China's" or "of China". So it is "Chinese Navy" if you want a proper English translation. Same goes to "British Navy" and "German Navy". Here British and German are not the people but the states.
"China Navy" is correct. It is a proper noun. It is the "U.S. Navy", not "American Navy".

Back then if they had translated the "Army" in PLA as "Force", we wouldn't have the confusion today.
 

taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
"China Navy" is correct. It is a proper noun. It is the "U.S. Navy", not "American Navy".

Back then if they had translated the "Army" in PLA as "Force", we wouldn't have the confusion today.
Ok, we are drifting, and I accept the "U.S. Navy" example, but what about "British Navy" not "Britain Navy"? I know the full name is "Her Majesty's Royal Navy", but the shortened commonly used name in British media.
 

steve_rolfe

Junior Member
Ok, we are drifting, and I accept the "U.S. Navy" example, but what about "British Navy" not "Britain Navy"? I know the full name is "Her Majesty's Royal Navy", but the shortened commonly used name in British media.
Being British myself, i know that our Navy is called the "Royal Navy" and nothing else. There is no such thing as the British Navy, and any other variations of this are unacceptable. I'd thought i'd clear that up.............now back to the topic of the type 055,.....thanks......:)
 

longmarch

Junior Member
Registered Member
No, in English Chinese means 1. Chinese people and 2. "China's" or "of China". So it is "Chinese Navy" if you want a proper English translation. Same goes to "British Navy" and "German Navy". Here British and German are not the people but the states.
That's English being ambiguous, In Chinese there is no such ambiguity, it's specifically about the state.
 

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