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Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
We don't know that for sure.
Besides, lack of fins does not PROVE gas diverting rudders are used. It can only imply likelihood of some other steering mechanism.

But, actually, when I am looking at the video shot shared above, of the little short stubby thing that does look like it could be YJ18 terminal section - it does have a shape which suggests to me steering fins at the end are quite possible. The red circle looks to me as if small fins could definitely be there, as the shape at the end seems different than the rest of the cylinder.
yj18snip.JPG

While the close up of YJ18 being fired from VLS does not show fins, it does not mean it's impossible some sort of fins were hidden from our view there.

And none of this what I wrote means I've taken a stand on whether the missile does or does not use gas rudders. It could very well use them. All I'd like is a proof for statements, not because of anyone else, but because of myself. Because if there is proof, then I too can use that proof and go around claiming YJ18 uses such methods.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
We don't know that for sure.
Besides, lack of fins does not PROVE gas diverting rudders are used. It can only imply likelihood of some other steering mechanism.

But, actually, when I am looking at the video shot shared above, of the little short stubby thing that does look like it could be YJ18 terminal section - it does have a shape which suggests to me steering fins at the end are quite possible. The red circle looks to me as if small fins could definitely be there, as the shape at the end seems different than the rest of the cylinder.
View attachment 65145

While the close up of YJ18 being fired from VLS does not show fins, it does not mean it's impossible some sort of fins were hidden from our view there.

And none of this what I wrote means I've taken a stand on whether the missile does or does not use gas rudders. It could very well use them. All I'd like is a proof for statements, not because of anyone else, but because of myself. Because if there is proof, then I too can use that proof and go around claiming YJ18 uses such methods.
IMO, that image is where the missile hasn't been detached yet. That's why the nose of the missile has a bit of a duck nose shape to it. There is also a bit of an opening or mouth underside, so this means the rocket has not detached. If it does, I am not sure if the camera is fast enough to catch it.

The image also seems to have a wider aspect in the original, then squeezed to fit TV screen.

The CGI don't show any fins at all (2:15 of the video).

 

xyqq

Junior Member
Registered Member
We don't know that for sure.
Besides, lack of fins does not PROVE gas diverting rudders are used. It can only imply likelihood of some other steering mechanism.

But, actually, when I am looking at the video shot shared above, of the little short stubby thing that does look like it could be YJ18 terminal section - it does have a shape which suggests to me steering fins at the end are quite possible. The red circle looks to me as if small fins could definitely be there, as the shape at the end seems different than the rest of the cylinder.
View attachment 65145

While the close up of YJ18 being fired from VLS does not show fins, it does not mean it's impossible some sort of fins were hidden from our view there.

And none of this what I wrote means I've taken a stand on whether the missile does or does not use gas rudders. It could very well use them. All I'd like is a proof for statements, not because of anyone else, but because of myself. Because if there is proof, then I too can use that proof and go around claiming YJ18 uses such methods.
The fin-like shadows could be the expansion waves from the projectile at the supersonic speed.

supersonic-projectile.jpg
 

by78

Brigadier
An interesting image, taken at a replenishment exercise at sea. We can see the moment the line is fired from the supply ship to a 054A frigate.

 

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