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HaldilalSDF

Junior Member
Registered Member
SSBN? You mean nuclear powered nuclear armed subs?

Does India have any experience with floating reactors? Who is giving them reactors?

I already posted about it see this.
Steel cutting of Indian Navy's first Nuclear-powered attack submarine SSN to take place in 2021. Total of 6 to be built the design is finalized. SSN design externally will be closer to western designs with eastern influence, while the internals will be split between western and eastern. 4 cluster of "x" celled VLS That would be 16 to 20 Missiles.

The design from Defexpo video screengrab Could be similar. Arihant silo will be the base, cut costs complexity and time. The SSN will use electric propulsion in place of gear box.
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DRDO & industry are jointly developing an electric motor driven Pumpjet propulsor for submarines. It is meant for the upcoming SSNs/SSBNs. BHEL has experience developing & deploying 20MW motors. That & the pumpjet R&D work done for the Shakti torpedo will prove critical here.
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To understand the context interms of adaptability of different types of missiles, both ballistic and cruise. All IN/DRDO will require is to design different adaptors for different missiles or combination of missiles as per mission requirements which will fit into arihant silo shown below. Plus reusing or deriving from Arihant silo will cut costs, complexity and time.
Let me drop a hint if one is looking for a rough idea of future SSN, take scorpene as a kind of indirect base very loosely. SSBN will also loosely have the same hydrodynamic features more or less lower body.
This pic is based on is a old scale test model. The actual SSBN will have a blended hump and a streamlined body. Don't believe, no problem. Anyways sometime back india established a 3d virtual reality interactive design center for submarine and ships, of the sort used by french naval group like the one below.

If you note the model , you will notice it is a two piece arrangement

First is the lower body ( main body ).
Second is the upper body ( hump and mast ).

This means upper body is interchangeable in the model for testing out different configurations of the same. And thus it is safe to imply that the model released is most probably a discarded early test model. Till today we don't have a clear pic of arihant, so what are the chances that they will release the confirmed model of a SSBN Zero.

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And the SSN will have a 1.5 Hull configure. Cant confirm it totally but can say it could have a much higher chances.
 

HaldilalSDF

Junior Member
Registered Member
Sorry but these are mere weapons & hull config. I was asking about the reactor. And the details here made me very confused.



???!!
Okay I will tell about the first nuclear submarine which is in service.

The Arihant was launched on July 26, 2009, it's taken four years for its nuclear reactor to achieve criticality. Its design is based on the Russian Akula-1 class submarines, of which the best-known example is the INS Chakra, a nuclear submarine leased for ten years by India from Russia in 2011 and formally commissioned into the Indian navy in 2012. In January 1988, when India first leased a Charlie class nuclear submarine from the Soviet Union for three years, it called it by the same name, INS Chakra. The 100-member Indian crew for the ‘Arihant’, besides training at the School for Advanced Underwater Warfare at Vishakapatnam, is also training on the new INS Chakra.

The Arihant's 83Mw pressurised water reactor (PWR) has also been built with considerable assistance from the Russians, who are said to have helped scientists at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in miniaturising the reactor to fit into the 10m diameter hull of the nuclear submarine.

If you are asking abou the S 5 Class Submarine Reactor then the information is scare.
 

Nobonita Barua

Senior Member
Registered Member
The Arihant was launched on July 26, 2009, it's taken four years for its nuclear reactor to achieve criticality. Its design is based on the Russian Akula-1 class submarines, of which the best-known example is the INS Chakra, a nuclear submarine leased for ten years by India from Russia in 2011 and formally commissioned into the Indian navy in 2012. In January 1988, when India first leased a Charlie class nuclear submarine from the Soviet Union for three years, it called it by the same name, INS Chakra. The 100-member Indian crew for the ‘Arihant’, besides training at the School for Advanced Underwater Warfare at Vishakapatnam, is also training on the new INS Chakra.

The Arihant's 83Mw pressurised water reactor (PWR) has also been built with considerable assistance from the Russians, who are said to have helped scientists at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in miniaturising the reactor to fit into the 10m diameter hull of the nuclear submarine.
So the designs & assistance have been provided by russians. Even with that i can't see how india can come up with indigenous reactor design for sub within barely a decade.

If you are asking abou the S 5 Class Submarine Reactor then the information is scare.
You better hope they know what they are doing.
 

HaldilalSDF

Junior Member
Registered Member
This is beyond stupid... I want to see 5 planes flying in formation and trying to turn. Good luck trying to not tangle the decoys or crash into each other.
This system is used by many airforce around the world and with many aircrafts.
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Gloire_bb

Senior Member
Registered Member
So the designs & assistance have been provided by russians. Even with that i can't see how india can come up with indigenous reactor design for sub within barely a decade.
Soviet&American submarine reactors appeared faster back in 1950s. 1980s China wasn't exactly a high tech hub either.
These nations were...highly motivated to move fast, that's for sure, but we aren't in 1950s anymore.
 

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