Indian Economics thread.


hashtagpls

Senior Member
Registered Member
I would argue India in fact has better geography than China. It was an incredibly long coastline and is highly dense in all parts of the country making infrastructure more "worth it".

It also does not have the monstrous mountains of south china
Perhaps, but would the massive diversity in diseases be coming from the squalor of indian cities or the jungles themselves?
 

hashtagpls

Senior Member
Registered Member
I think India taking over Goa was a bad decision in the long run. If they had let it become a gateway like Hong Kong or Macau, they may very well have developed much quicker.
Isn't it funny that the liberal and democratic Indians have already invaded Goa and Sikkim whilst the anglos and the free world didn't do jack about it, and yet there's all this brou-ha-ha over China and HK and taiwan?
 

AndrewS

Colonel
Registered Member
I would argue India in fact has better geography than China. It was an incredibly long coastline and is highly dense in all parts of the country making infrastructure more "worth it".

It also does not have the monstrous mountains of south china

But China actually has twice the length of coastline as India?

The core Chinese mainland has a similar area and population density to India.
But China also has outlying areas like the North East, Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang and Tibet - which have a much lower population density

Another issue is that because India is much more subtropical and densely populated - the prevalence of disease has resulted in too much diversity in terms of languages and peoples - if they wanted to run as a single country efficiently.
 

Kaeshmiri

Junior Member
Registered Member
I wish i had the time to write all the plethora of reasons why India can never be economically big as China. The issue is certainly not about geography which is actually very conducive to growth. The issue is actually about their society and its divisions (caste, religion, region) and system of governance.
 

Overbom

Senior Member
Registered Member
I wish i had the time to write all the plethora of reasons why India can never be economically big as China. The issue is certainly not about geography which is actually very conducive to growth. The issue is actually about their society and its divisions (caste, religion, region) and system of governance.
The other issue, is the 4th Industrial Revolution which IMO by 2027-2030, we would have witnessed some changes. By 2035-2040 the world would be going full throttle advancing on a new era.

As for India... Good luck feeding hundreds of millions of people with cheap labour manufacturing when automation by min. 2030 to max. 2040, would have massacred this economic model
 

AndrewS

Colonel
Registered Member
The other issue, is the 4th Industrial Revolution which IMO by 2027-2030, we would have witnessed some changes. By 2035-2040 the world would be going full throttle advancing on a new era.

As for India... Good luck feeding hundreds of millions of people with cheap labour manufacturing when automation by min. 2030 to max. 2040, would have massacred this economic model

Even before this, technological change was limiting labour demand

For example in the USA, the total number of hours worked hasn't actually changed over the past 30 years, despite a significant increase in population
 

Overbom

Senior Member
Registered Member
Even before this, technological change was limiting labour demand

For example in the USA, the total number of hours worked hasn't actually changed over the past 30 years, despite a significant increase in population
Thats the economic model of the US
When people are saying that the US is the wealthiest country in the world, it is not a meme, it is true. That the US has not taken advantage of this, is another story.

However, I believe that the coming technological changes will be far far more impactful to low-cost labour than before.

India is especially vulnerable in this. While in China, robotics firms have seen an absolutely huge influx of investment this and the past year.

The coming years/decade will certainly strain and eventually break the current economic/development model of the world.

China can adapt, as for India i doubt it. It has gotten to the game way too late while also having other serious issues (caste, religion, low gov administrative capacity and capability)
 

AndrewS

Colonel
Registered Member
Thats the economic model of the US
When people are saying that the US is the wealthiest country in the world, it is not a meme, it is true. That the US has not taken advantage of this, is another story.

Yes, but it is indicative of what the labour situation situation is like for a high-income service economy.

That is what is already happening to India's vaunted software and outsourcing industries.

However, I believe that the coming technological changes will be far far more impactful to low-cost labour than before.

India is especially vulnerable in this. While in China, robotics firms have seen an absolutely huge influx of investment this and the past year.

The coming years/decade will certainly strain and eventually break the current economic/development model of the world.

China can adapt, as for India i doubt it. It has gotten to the game way too late while also having other serious issues (caste, religion, low gov administrative capacity and capability)

Agreed

China already has the supply chains

Given that China installed 40% of the world's robots in 2020, I wouldn't be surprised if China soon starts installing more robots than the rest combined. That's a huge opportunity for domestic Chinese robot makers.
 

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