CV-XX (003 carrier) Thread I ... News & Discussions


Richard Santos

Junior Member
Registered Member
Reduction gearing is about half the size of the steam turbine itself. Source:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

View attachment 69356

that is a power generation turbine, which turns only one way, and expands through stages on the same spindle. It is not representative of either the complexity or the compactness of marine steam turbines, which would be size constrained, have to be able to turn both ways, and in a high speed vessel, the output shaft can turn at higher RPM than on many power plant turbogenerators.

Marine steam turbines have at least two spindles, to enable ahead and astern operation. Many marine steam turbines have 3 spindles, with high and low pressure ahead stages on different spindles, and a third spindle for astern. All the spindles are meshed with the same gear box. A typical modern marine steam turbine would have all three spindles in the same casing, unlike early marine steam turbines, where the spindles could be in entirely Different engine rooms. A typical modern high speed marine steam turbine‘s double reduction gear box casing would be roughly the same size as the casing for the steam turbine.
 

zbb

New Member
Registered Member
that is a power generation turbine, which turns only one way, and expands through stages on the same spindle. It is not representative of either the complexity or the compactness of marine steam turbines, which would be size constrained, have to be able to turn both ways, and in a high speed vessel, the output shaft can turn at higher RPM than on many power plant turbogenerators.

Marine steam turbines have at least two spindles, to enable ahead and astern operation. Many marine steam turbines have 3 spindles, with high and low pressure ahead stages on different spindles, and a third spindle for astern. All the spindles are meshed with the same gear box. A typical modern marine steam turbine would have all three spindles in the same casing, unlike early marine steam turbines, where the spindles could be in entirely Different engine rooms. A typical modern high speed marine steam turbine‘s double reduction gear box casing would be roughly the same size as the casing for the steam turbine.
Isn't 003 using an integrated electric propulsion system? Wouldn't that mean its steam turbines would be more or less power generation turbines instead of traditional marine steam turbines?
 

nlalyst

Junior Member
Registered Member
Isn't 003 using an integrated electric propulsion system? Wouldn't that mean its steam turbines would be more or less power generation turbines instead of traditional marine steam turbines?
It is unlikely that 003 will have IFEP. If it's going to match the speed of US conventional carriers, its combined propulsion + pulse + electronic and service power requirement will have to surpass 200MW. That's more electrical power generation than even the Ford class (~160MW) and is likely too risky at this point in time for the PLAN which has not yet operated an IFEP or even hybrid-electric vessel.

Everyone expects that. But what we've seen so far doesn't look like it. Looks like it is a new hull with the tried and tested machinery from the Kuznetsov / Liaoning / Shandong.
The rumors I've heard from other forum members spoke of a 7kV onboard DC network in trials. That voltage is too low to meet the requirements of a +200 MW load. For comparison, the Ford class use double that (13,8 kV AC) to distribute their 160 MWs. The propulsive power on the other hand is delivered mechanically. The steam here plays the role of integrated power, as it can be shared between propulsive and non-propulsive loads. I expect the 003 to have a similar arrangement, if not as integrated.
 
Last edited:

Bltizo

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Registered Member
View attachment 69419
02/03/2021

Hanger level nearly done it seems, just missing the bow and stern sections.

I'd say with the bow and stern remaining as is visible, the hangar level is more like half done at best, rather than nearly done.

That said it's just a matter of time.
 

Top