CV-XX (003 carrier) Thread I ... News & Discussions


nlalyst

Junior Member
Registered Member
The problem of long shafts bit overblown.

They are not that heavy ,they need to be only hollow tubes.

The USN selected electric drive in the 1910s because it was the more mature reduction technology. The Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 substantially limited the max displacement of capital ships. The extra weight of electric drive together with the maturation of reduction gears made them the inferior solution.

Those 120 escort destroyers built in 1943-1944 used electric drive because the gear manufacturing capacity was insufficient to keep up with demand.

Issue is simple, the ship has a cost ,weight limit, and a desired maximum speed, and the electric propulsion usually has inferior characteristic if all three considered compared to direct geared drive.
True, but those are not the only relevant parameters for a warship. In no particular priority: survivability, acoustics, fuel economy are three parameters where electric propulsion typically has the advantage.
 

Anlsvrthng

Senior Member
Registered Member
True, but those are not the only relevant parameters for a warship. In no particular priority: survivability, acoustics, fuel economy are three parameters where electric propulsion typically has the advantage.

Agree, however the USA NAVY tried it with the Zumwalt, implementing HTS motors, and visibly it was a failure.
 

nlalyst

Junior Member
Registered Member
Agree, however the USA NAVY tried it with the Zumwalt, implementing HTS motors, and visibly it was a failure.
That sounds like a canard. The HTS motor was never meant for the Zumwalt class. It was a research project that delivered a 36.5MW prototype in 2006. It was not considered mature enough to be installed on the Zumwalts. Thos ships have AIMs for the cost of substantially more volume and weight.

HTS may be an option for the future large surface combatant. Until then, they will be building the Constellation class frigates with more down to earth permanent magnet motors in hybrid configuration with a gas turbine for extra oomph.
 

taxiya

Colonel
Registered Member
Well, it's certainly not impossible to have GT on a demanding ship like this.
I know that, but we are not really into designing the "best" ship that some of us personally prefer. We are discussing the specific 003, for any meaningful discussion there has to be something of evidence or new "rumor", which I don't find anywhere, so I asked.
 

azretonov

Junior Member
Registered Member
I know that, but we are not really into designing the "best" ship that some of us personally prefer. We are discussing the specific 003, for any meaningful discussion there has to be something of evidence or new "rumor", which I don't find anywhere, so I asked.
While some of us may indeed, seek for the best for much less demanding reasons, my position is not so much obscure. While all-diesel solutions are usually more stable, efficient and economic than GT hybrids, this ship is expected to fulfill certain operational requirements.

1) It is expected to conduct dual-carrier operations and if the data about Kuznetsov family is to be believed, this girl -at certain conditions- should be able to make 29 knots.
2) From what I've read on Nimitz-class, even CATOBAR carriers still employ "higher cruising speed & turning into the wind" approach to negate over-stressing airframes and the catapult system. (Source: ISBN: 978 1 84603 759 7)

Even though there is no evidence to support it; from the materials I read, I expect at least some DE+GT hybrid. I've seen a CODLAD LHD on trials and performance was simply enough for helo ops.
As always, I'm open to corrections with citation (if possible).
 
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Anlsvrthng

Senior Member
Registered Member
That sounds like a canard. The HTS motor was never meant for the Zumwalt class. It was a research project that delivered a 36.5MW prototype in 2006. It was not considered mature enough to be installed on the Zumwalts. Thos ships have AIMs for the cost of substantially more volume and weight.

HTS may be an option for the future large surface combatant. Until then, they will be building the Constellation class frigates with more down to earth permanent magnet motors in hybrid configuration with a gas turbine for extra oomph.
Whops, I wasn't aware that the HTS motors never made they ways into the Zumwalts. : D

Anyway, the AMSC story is 15 years old, and nothing happened since. And the HTSC technology is the enabler of full electric naval ships.
 

banjex

Junior Member
Registered Member
Stupid question, but which direction does a carrier turn when launching jets - wind from behind or front?
 

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