CV-XX (003 carrier) Thread I ... News & Discussions


Anlsvrthng

Senior Member
Registered Member
There is a google earth pro update for the shipyard.

Possible to measure the length of the ship. All pieces together gives 290-300 m , beam 40 m ish .

Interesting is the lack of additional elements about the ship.

It is 40 m wide, so I expected same 20/40 m wide elements laying around, but nothing.
 

Higgle

Junior Member
Registered Member
There is a google earth pro update for the shipyard.

Possible to measure the length of the ship. All pieces together gives 290-300 m , beam 40 m ish .

Interesting is the lack of additional elements about the ship.

It is 40 m wide, so I expected same 20/40 m wide elements laying around, but nothing.

Hangar walls and overhang will be next. No more big modules.
 

boytoy

New Member
Registered Member
Too much remains hidden. Only the gearbox. Or at least it also looks like a gearbox to me.

Arrangement can also apply to CODLAG. So now the plot thickens.

View attachment 65839


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Can anyone explain the long shaft to the propellers? If they move the gas turbine away from the propellers to the other side of the electric motors, can't they shorten the shaft and have a much more compact design? Space is precious on a warship, so surely that's better no?
 

subotai1

Junior Member
Registered Member
Can anyone explain the long shaft to the propellers? If they move the gas turbine away from the propellers to the other side of the electric motors, can't they shorten the shaft and have a much more compact design? Space is precious on a warship, so surely that's better no?
A number of reasons. Big one is balance. Putting the heaviest machinery in the middle of the ship optimizes weight and handling. Another is survivability. You can have them in the middle of the ship and still have them separated somewhat, in case of a strike.
 

Tam

Colonel
Registered Member
Can anyone explain the long shaft to the propellers? If they move the gas turbine away from the propellers to the other side of the electric motors, can't they shorten the shaft and have a much more compact design? Space is precious on a warship, so surely that's better no?

The bigger the ship the more you need to put towards the center for balance. You can see that with commercial ships. The smaller container ships have their superstructure and funnel all the way to the back. But at a certain point as they grow in size, the superstructure is moved moved away from the back, along with the funnel, and they added a superstructure towards the front with the machinery and fuel tanks in between. Space is precious in every ship but balance is more so.

blog_jv_technologies.jpg78a88cb29b6fd440ab6e6cc8cbae5294.jpg
 

boytoy

New Member
Registered Member
The bigger the ship the more you need to put towards the center for balance. You can see that with commercial ships. The smaller container ships have their superstructure and funnel all the way to the back. But at a certain point as they grow in size, the superstructure is moved moved away from the back, along with the funnel, and they added a superstructure towards the front with the machinery and fuel tanks in between. Space is precious in every ship but balance is more so.

View attachment 65895View attachment 65896

Thanks for the explanation. Why not a full diesel electric power system where propeller is only powered by electric motors? This would eliminate need for gear boxes used by the gas turbine. You can put the generators in the center of the ship, and route power to the motors near the propellers. No need for long shaft, which increases both space efficiency and power efficiency.
 

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