CV-XX (003 carrier) Thread I ... News & Discussions


reservior dogs

Junior Member
Registered Member
Stupid question: What is the real advantage of having a nuclear powerplant instead of burning bunker fuel besides range?

I have experience in commercial shipping and if taking the large commercial bulkers/tankers/containers as reference, a conventionally powered ship can perform voyages for 50-100 days after a single bunker stop depending on speed (50d at full speed and 100d on eco, that‘s about 3000nm or half the globe).

Now I would imagine that 3.5 months is pretty much stretching food provisions (ignoring the crew now, crew changes in commercial shipping happenevery 6 odd months) so a resupply will be needed in any case without which the combination of vessel+crew isn‘t able to function properly anymore. Open waters ship-to-ship transfers aren‘t exactly an exotic thing either and for what I guess the operational area to be, an MR tanker would be more than enough.

So in absence of having to sail halfway across the globe and still be able to fight battles at arrival, what would be the other operational benefits of being nuclear powered?
Aside from not needing fuel, there are other advantages.
1. Nuclear reactors do not need to vent flu-gas, so the island construction is smaller and can be placed more optimally for runways. The location of the engine can now be more optimally placed for carrier operation.
2. diesel engines plus fuel take up a lot more internal space which now could be allocated for other things like more aircrafts and air fuel.
3. There is an upper limit to how much one can scale the engines to the size of the carrier, so conventional fuel engine carriers hit size limit earlier then nuclear ones. if you can increase the size by 50%, It adds 2x the power for a carrier. Nuclear power carriers can be larger.
4. Carriers typically need to travel at least at 30 knots. Due to the size of the engines, the amount of power in excess of requirement at top speed is limited for conventional power carriers. More excess power of the nuclear carriers allow the carrier to do more things.
 

Deino

Lieutenant General
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After a longer break finally a new and clearer image of the Type 003 aircraft carrier under construction at the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai.

Type 003 carrier - 20201027 - 1 part XXL.jpgType 003 carrier - 20201027 - 1 part.jpgType 003 carrier - 20201027 - 1.jpgType 003 carrier - 20201027 - 2 part.jpgType 003 carrier - 20201027 - 2.jpg

But I'm no longer sure if - as suspected by the previous images - there is still a gap between the aft modules or if it is in fact a bridge that allows the workers to cross over the modules.
Type 003 carrier - 20201027 - 1 part XXL++.jpg

(Images via:
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via LKJ86/PDF)
 

asdf1234

New Member
Registered Member
Well it makes you less dependent on supplies. Yes you have unlimited range. Some modern nuclear reactors can even last 30 years without refueling. Traditional ones required a refueling every 5 years or something like that. You have so much power you can desalinate water easily. So you basically can have all the drinking water and bath water on board you want. And unlike in commercial shipping for cargo you will have thousands of people operating aboard the carrier. You have the crew, and all the support staff for the aircraft. This includes crew, mechanics, you name it. Easily thousands of people. The reactor is compact. You basically don't need the space you would use for fuel tanks. That can instead be used for other things be it cargo or more aircraft.
Right, completely forgot about warships not only being crewed by ten sailors and an optional parrot... the space argument makes much more sense in that light, thanks!
 

Intrepid

Captain
My guess:

after installation of the forward power supply for the two EMALS on the forecastle deck they will move the main section of the hull by 20 meters in direction of the bow. Then the aft power supply for the waist EMALS will be installed through the new createtd 20-meter-gapp and thereafter the rear section will be moved to the remaining hull to complete it with a waterline length of 285 meters (expected length of the flightdeck 315 meters).

What do you think?

That would be a reason for the two gapps.
 

defenceman

Junior Member
Registered Member
Hi so how long for 003 to be pushed into the water and after that how long will it take to be operational by standards of Liaoning any one having some info about this will be appreciated
thank you
 

Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
A year and a half to get launched, two and half years to get commissioned and another year or two before some initial combat capability is reached. So 5 to 6 years altogether. Its fighter wing should have to be ready in 4 to 5 Years.
 

NeutralWarrior

New Member
Registered Member
Pardon me for my noobness on shipbuilding. Is it just me who thinks the progress on 003 carrier is a tad too slow?

I mean, we are all used to the "China Speed" displayed in 055, 075 and 002 carrier Shandong, but we couldn't see any major progress
after months of work on this 003. Encountered technical issues? Progress stalled?

Any idea how long more can we see the actual shape, or at least a recognizable shape of a flattop carrier?

Thanks all.

After a longer break finally a new and clearer image of the Type 003 aircraft carrier under construction at the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai.

View attachment 64971View attachment 64972View attachment 64973View attachment 64974View attachment 64975

But I'm no longer sure if - as suspected by the previous images - there is still a gap between the aft modules or if it is in fact a bridge that allows the workers to cross over the modules.
View attachment 64977

(Images via:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
via LKJ86/PDF)
 

Bltizo

Lieutenant General
Staff member
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Pardon me for my noobness on shipbuilding. Is it just me who thinks the progress on 003 carrier is a tad too slow?

I mean, we are all used to the "China Speed" displayed in 055, 075 and 002 carrier Shandong, but we couldn't see any major progress
after months of work on this 003. Encountered technical issues? Progress stalled?

Any idea how long more can we see the actual shape, or at least a recognizable shape of a flattop carrier?

Thanks all.
It seems slower because the method of construction is somewhat more exposed than it was at DL.
At DL the modular method of construction used far smaller modules as the keel came together in drydock over the course of a year or so. But we didn't see the modules themselves get fabricated.

In JN, we saw the super blocks get fabricated and prepositioned in the fabrication area, before suddenly all getting moved over to the drydock a few months ago, where they were then getting assembled together.

So basically it's all about when you start "measuring".
If you measure in terms of the "tonnage of hull assembled in drydock over time," then JN is actually much much faster than DL because they literally went from having zero tons of the ship's hull in drydock, to having virtually all of the ship's keel (up to over the waterline) in the drydock literally within weeks, whereas it took DL over half a year.


As far as construction speed goes, the only fair comparison to 003 is CV-17/002, and I wouldn't be surprised if the overall time from initial serious fabrication to launch for both ships is about similar. That said 003 is a bigger ship than 002 and more complex as well, so I wouldn't be surprised if it takes a bit longer.


As far as how long it will take to see the "shape" of a carrier, that will be once they start assembling the hangar and flight deck modules, which depends on when the work in the vital powerplant areas and the current keel blocks are done. We don't currently have a projection for when completion of that will be done.
It might end up progressing at a similar speed to 002 from here onwards, or it might be faster.


So no, I don't think it's a tad too slow at all, cause there's lots of confounding factors all pulling the ship's potential construction speed in both directions.
- new construction method (super blocks), suggests may be faster, but visually more sudden
- JN is arguably more competent shipyard than DL, suggests may be faster
- 003 is more complex and larger ship than 002, suggests may be slower

How do we weigh those things above for an accurate projection? I don't think we really can, down to a level of detail of months.

I personally would be surprised if within a year the hangar level and flight deck level modules had not begun being assembled.


.... lastly I'm not sure how you can call the progress slow to be honest -- this is what the ship looked like just two and a half months ago:
august.jpg
 

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