CV-XX (003 carrier) Thread I ... News & Discussions


Klon

Junior Member
Registered Member
Satellite photos are considered sensitive material, and analysts can use them to deduce a lot more information, compared to conventional photographs like the ones we used to get for the 002 in Dalian.

In fact, posting satellite imagery is strictly forbidden on CJDBY.

View attachment 62183

Here we can see that green is the drydock, and yellow is the assembly/preparation area. We can deduce that:

1. The keel has been laid and there are more modules in drydock compared to a few days ago.
2. There are more modules in the staging area that are ready to be moved into the dock.
3. There are a couple of environmental shelters to make construction work easier.

And as casual watchers, that's all we need to know.

On the other hand, if it was a higher resolution, we'd be able to figure out details such as:

1. The dimensions of the modules, thereby allowing us to estimate the length and beam and approximate displacement.
2. The exact layout of the machinery spaces, based on where the bulkheads are, which would give clues as to the nature of its propulsion system, and with this information we can make reasonable estimates about its top speed and endurance.
3. The precise stage of assembly that the carrier is at, thereby allowing us to track the progress of construction and discern potentially sensitive information regarding military shipbuilding capabilities.

And so on...

There are some things that don't need to be discussed at this stage.
This is one of the more nonsensical policies, because high resolution images are certainly available to those operating spy satellites and better commercial imagery is released regularly, so the only people restricted to blurry/no satellite footage are cjdby users.
 

Higgle

Junior Member
Registered Member
This is one of the more nonsensical policies, because high resolution images are certainly available to those operating spy satellites and better commercial imagery is released regularly, so the only people restricted to blurry/no satellite footage are cjdby users.
I agree, and it's nonsensical to the extent that blurring these pictures won't stop spy satellites and high-grade commercial imagery from taking high-resolution photos. But at the least, it is able to keep certain information out of the public sphere. The fact that the new carrier's specifications are so hazy even for us at SDF means that these details will not be public until a long time into the future. I don't see anyone posting high-resolution imagery here, for one. So I'd say that the self-censorship is working remarkably well, given that certain details are effectively classified for the next couple of years or perhaps longer.
 

lcloo

Junior Member
This is one of the more nonsensical policies, because high resolution images are certainly available to those operating spy satellites and better commercial imagery is released regularly, so the only people restricted to blurry/no satellite footage are cjdby users.
Planet.com offers two types of satellite photo quality. Free photos are low resolution as the one we have just seen. If you want nice clear phot than you have to pay.

By the way, this is a commercial satellite photo, don't expect it as clear as spy satellite photo.

Check up website of planet.com.
 

Orthan

Junior Member
(Image via @铁幕君SSS from Weibo)
Good clear photo from JN shipyard. Its a huge place.

Seems to me now that those are probably the modules that were moved from the previous place. It looks tiny compared to that big blue cargo ship being built next to it. Does anyone has a clue on what is its lenght now?
 

Tam

Major
Registered Member
That 052DL getting its sonar fitted a while ago is no longer, which I would assume is job accomplished, and the dock it was in, is now filled with water.

Four white ships to the right, all seem like 052DL, and I would presume the second one would be 122 Tangshan awaiting delivery. This fits to what I know that there should be three 052DL on trials, future pennants 132, 157 and 162.

Two 052DL and two 055 in the fitting pool. I wonder where the other two 055 went. On trials at this moment of photo?

Freaking large order of box ships from CMA CGN. There are five of them in this photo alone. I wonder why one of the hulls have the light blue color.
 

Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
What a huge shipyard It is only yesterday when Jiangnan shipyard moved from Shanghai in 2010 And within 10 years, they magically converted a barren island Changxing into maybe the largest shipyard in the world. Jiangnan is the oldest shipyard in china here is interesting historically background

Kiangnan Arsenal
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Gun transportation at Kiangnan Arsenal in
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, during the
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.

The origins of the Jiangnan Shipyard lie in the
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of the late 19th century in China, during the
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. The Self-Strengthening Movement (
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: 洋務運動/自強運動/同治維新), c. 1861 – 1895, was a period of institutional reforms initiated in China during the late
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following a series of military defeats and concessions to foreign powers. One of the projects in this campaign of modernisation was the establishment of defence industries, including the Kiangnan Arsenal in
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in 1865 (the fourth year of the
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). Plans for the arsenal were established under
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, who served as
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, although its actual establishment became the responsibilities of
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.

The
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name of the Kiangnan Arsenal was the General Bureau of Machine Manufacture of Jiangnan (
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: 江南機器製造總局;
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: Jiāngnán Jīqì Zhìzào Zǒngjú), or the Jiangnan (or Kiangnan) Machine Works for short. It was established to both manufacture firearms and also build naval vessels. The shipyard, plant and machinery were initially leased from Thomas Hunt and Company, an American firm within the concessions of Shanghai. Due to the influx of workers and the reluctance of the concession authorities to allow arms to be manufactured within their territory, the Chinese authorities purchased the plant and equipment and combined these with the existing assets of the old Suzhou and Anqing arsenals as well as new equipment purchased by
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in the United States to form the new Kiangnan Arsenal in 1865.

The Kiangnan Arsenal was the largest of the arsenals established during the Self-Strengthening Movement, and also the one with the largest budget—from 1869, its annual budget was more than 400,000 silver
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. A series of high officials, including
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,
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, and
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, served as its head, although
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served the longest term during the
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. Most of the senior technical staff were Westerners, such as the first chief engineer, American T. F. Falls, and prolific translator
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.
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During the Tongzhi era, the Arsenal was the largest weapons factory in
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. Among its other achievements were the first domestically produced steam boat (the Huiji) in 1868 and the first domestically produced steel in 1891.

As well as its manufacturing works, the Arsenal also comprised a language school, a translation house and a technical school.
 

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