China need a new geopolitical Doctrine ?


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zgx09t

Junior Member
Registered Member
....China is still buying a lot from Australia and those UK goods are still being bought. The Chinese ambassador in UK said they still want win-win relation with UK. So get out of your bubble and see the real world.

....they said that for huawei it is a no. Soon it well be another no for tiktok. So what? China should not really care because China is not defined by Huawei.

China has not threaten Japan over huawei ban. What is the issue with Australia and Europe? Incoherent Policy.

Trade with Australia is booming and the Chinese ambassador in UK is still cajoling the UK gov after the huawei ban. Empty threat.

China bought gold bullion from UK, as a diversification in her fx reserve, far more than any other single item in her trade with UK. As long as the need is there, she won't be shy buying what she needs. Ditto for Aussies, a wholesale commodity seller. As the circumstances have it, it's not a seller's market - their Treasury have their baseline expectation of US$55/tn fob iron ore in QIII 2020, generating a projected revenue shortfall of A$ 185 billion, per their July fiscal update. Not a good time to pick a fight, especially for empty rhetoric and symbolic gestures against a market where more than 31% of their export went. China can climb up the escalation ladder one easy gingerly step at a time - barley, beef, wool, ...., etc. The list is endless.
US is far bigger market for UK than China, four times as big. Here goes the rationale behind UK flip-flopping around Huawei; Uk has to avoid a bigger stick coming from Trump Admin, along with the ongoing Brexit saga, not even counting the resurgent Independence sentiments in Scotland where a recent Panelbase report shows 54% wants a separation from UK . UK can always weasel back into Huawei camp again down the line once the trade threats from US is somehow relieved or gone.
US blacklisted a few of HW's R&D centers. It seems it hasn't made a serious impact on HW's own innovation ecosystem. HW is doubling down on R&D this year, with a 2020 projection of US$20 billion, going toe to toe with Apple's, which ended the recent quarter with around US$5 bil charge in R&D. HW's success lies in her global R&D ecosystem, where local brightest and sharpest are recruited and kept in the ecosystem, complete with childcare and private schools. That was how they solved all the frequency fragmentation problems in 5G, so I heard. Ericsson and Nokia just didn't have enough money to hire enough smart people to do that. HW did. Basically using West's brain poaching tactics against developing countries and have them beat at their own game in their own turf. Some estimates have it around half a trillion dollars in Western camp to entirely ditch Huawei and replace it with Ericsson and Nokia gear. Nobody is able to come up with that kind of money, especially now, to fill that whole. A lot of US carriers are saddled with redundant fiber optics lines as well. You can put sanctions all you want, as long as that ecosystem is thriving, HW would have the last laugh.

So Tidal, I can imagine how you felt when you didn't cut it to HW where only the best are hired.
 

SPOOPYSKELETON

Junior Member
Registered Member
Honestly, bitcoin would solve a lot of problems China has right now. Shame it turned out to be a ponzi.

China bought gold bullion from UK, as a diversification in her fx reserve, far more than any other single item in her trade with UK. As long as the need is there, she won't be shy buying what she needs. Ditto for Aussies, a wholesale commodity seller. As the circumstances have it, it's not a seller's market - their Treasury have their baseline expectation of US$55/tn fob iron ore in QIII 2020, generating a projected revenue shortfall of A$ 185 billion, per their July fiscal update. Not a good time to pick a fight, especially for empty rhetoric and symbolic gestures against a market where more than 31% of their export went. China can climb up the escalation ladder one easy gingerly step at a time - barley, beef, wool, ...., etc. The list is endless.
US is far bigger market for UK than China, four times as big. Here goes the rationale behind UK flip-flopping around Huawei; Uk has to avoid a bigger stick coming from Trump Admin, along with the ongoing Brexit saga, not even counting the resurgent Independence sentiments in Scotland where a recent Panelbase report shows 54% wants a separation from UK . UK can always weasel back into Huawei camp again down the line once the trade threats from US is somehow relieved or gone.
US blacklisted a few of HW's R&D centers. It seems it hasn't made a serious impact on HW's own innovation ecosystem. HW is doubling down on R&D this year, with a 2020 projection of US$20 billion, going toe to toe with Apple's, which ended the recent quarter with around US$5 bil charge in R&D. HW's success lies in her global R&D ecosystem, where local brightest and sharpest are recruited and kept in the ecosystem, complete with childcare and private schools. That was how they solved all the frequency fragmentation problems in 5G, so I heard. Ericsson and Nokia just didn't have enough money to hire enough smart people to do that. HW did. Basically using West's brain poaching tactics against developing countries and have them beat at their own game in their own turf. Some estimates have it around half a trillion dollars in Western camp to entirely ditch Huawei and replace it with Ericsson and Nokia gear. Nobody is able to come up with that kind of money, especially now, to fill that whole. A lot of US carriers are saddled with redundant fiber optics lines as well. You can put sanctions all you want, as long as that ecosystem is thriving, HW would have the last laugh.

So Tidal, I can imagine how you felt when you didn't cut it to HW where only the best are hired.

I like this post, but come on escobar isn't tidal.
 

montyp165

Junior Member
We have already debate on that but you prefer empty and rhetoric talk. It is not even about Huawei.
But in a the HW case, why should you set as a goal to make a country use it when you don't really have the power to do that and the whole country Gov don't want it? It will end with threat and theatrical.

It's not the Chinese making the threats and theatrics, when it's blatantly clear the US is the one repeatedly doing it not only against China but also against American citizens defending their rights. Saying otherwise is just fascist apologia.
 

AssassinsMace

Lieutenant General
If the US breaks relations with China as Trump has threatened, what is the US going to do if China supports Iran? Threaten economic sanctions...? I don't think the question is if will China support Iran? The question is when will China have nothing to lose?
 

escobar

Brigadier
China bought gold bullion from UK, as a diversification in her fx reserve, far more than any other single item in her trade with UK. As long as the need is there, she won't be shy buying what she needs. Ditto for Aussies, a wholesale commodity seller. As the circumstances have it, it's not a seller's market - their Treasury have their baseline expectation of US$55/tn fob iron ore in QIII 2020, generating a projected revenue shortfall of A$ 185 billion, per their July fiscal update. Not a good time to pick a fight, especially for empty rhetoric and symbolic gestures against a market where more than 31% of their export went. China can climb up the escalation ladder one easy gingerly step at a time - barley, beef, wool, ...., etc. The list is endless.
US is far bigger market for UK than China, four times as big. Here goes the rationale behind UK flip-flopping around Huawei; Uk has to avoid a bigger stick coming from Trump Admin, along with the ongoing Brexit saga, not even counting the resurgent Independence sentiments in Scotland where a recent Panelbase report shows 54% wants a separation from UK . UK can always weasel back into Huawei camp again down the line once the trade threats from US is somehow relieved or gone.
US blacklisted a few of HW's R&D centers. It seems it hasn't made a serious impact on HW's own innovation ecosystem. HW is doubling down on R&D this year, with a 2020 projection of US$20 billion, going toe to toe with Apple's, which ended the recent quarter with around US$5 bil charge in R&D. HW's success lies in her global R&D ecosystem, where local brightest and sharpest are recruited and kept in the ecosystem, complete with childcare and private schools. That was how they solved all the frequency fragmentation problems in 5G, so I heard. Ericsson and Nokia just didn't have enough money to hire enough smart people to do that. HW did. Basically using West's brain poaching tactics against developing countries and have them beat at their own game in their own turf. Some estimates have it around half a trillion dollars in Western camp to entirely ditch Huawei and replace it with Ericsson and Nokia gear. Nobody is able to come up with that kind of money, especially now, to fill that whole. A lot of US carriers are saddled with redundant fiber optics lines as well. You can put sanctions all you want, as long as that ecosystem is thriving, HW would have the last laugh.

So Tidal, I can imagine how you felt when you didn't cut it to HW where only the best are hired.

Nice post but what is the link with our debate?
 
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