Strategic implications of Chinese/US AI development

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by shifty_ginosaji, Nov 13, 2018.

  1. RedMercury
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    RedMercury Junior Member

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    Well previous documents stated 20 engineers from Freescale semiconductor were onboard, 8 of which were Chinese. Is there any source for the 60 claim?
     
  2. tidalwave
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    tidalwave Senior Member
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    look at the picture that shows the news program indicates engineers from huawei and ZTE, It didn't mention Freescale. The caption also shows the number 60 , 60 of the engineers.
     
  3. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    You can check the passenger list manifesto here. So far I found one ZTE and two Huawei engineers or managers, but Freescale took the brunt of it. The Freescale engineers that were Malaysians, many were ethnically Chinese. There is one IBM executive, one Chinese working for Halliburton, one Chinese working for a Chinese telecom company, and two that appears to work for the state MIIT. The art of modern Chinese calligraphy certainly took a beating with this crash.

    https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/1475564/flight-mh370-who-were-passengers-aboard-lost-aircraft
     
  4. Anlsvrthng
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    Anlsvrthng Senior Member
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    This clever AI hid data from its creators to cheat at its appointed task
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/12/31/t...-to-cheat-at-its-appointed-task/?guccounter=1

    Depending on how paranoid you are, this research from Stanford and Google will be either terrifying or fascinating. A machine learning agent intended to transform aerial images into street maps and back was found to be cheating by hiding information it would need later in “a nearly imperceptible, high-frequency signal.” Clever girl!

    But in fact this occurrence, far from illustrating some kind of malign intelligence inherent to AI, simply reveals a problem with computers that has existed since they were invented: they do exactly what you tell them to do.
    ...
    But a computer creating its own steganographic method to evade having to actually learn to perform the task at hand is rather new.
     
  5. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Apple is using purportedly chinese economy slowdown as the reason for declining sale. I think that is a cop out The real reason as Mace said is Huawei beat Apple in China and increasingly around the world because there is not much difference anymore in technical spec It show how much Huawei has progress while Apple is sleeping on its laurel. I think this is a trend and harbinger of the future
    At firs people are hesitant about new company but after trying it they get hooked like the old cereal ad
    Hey Mickey try it and He Liked it
    US use all kind of measure to stem the rise of Huawei from market restriction to innuendo and defamation to no avail Because at the end the principle of free market work "May the best product win"
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/04/technology/china-smartphones-iphone.html
    In Price and Value, Chinese Phone Makers Outpace Apple in Much of the World

    An Apple store in Beijing. The iPhone maker is facing fierce competition in China, and elsewhere, from the country’s homegrown brands.CreditGilles Sabrié for The New York Times
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    An Apple store in Beijing. The iPhone maker is facing fierce competition in China, and elsewhere, from the country’s homegrown brands.CreditCreditGilles Sabrié for The New York Times


    By Raymond Zhong

    BEIJING — To most Americans, the names are unfamiliar, maybe a little hard to pronounce: Huawei, Xiaomi, Oppo, Vivo.

    They are China’s biggest smartphone brands. Around the world — although not in the United States — they are making the handset business brutally competitive. This week, after Apple warned of disappointing iPhone sales in China, industry observers said that devices from the Chinese brands were a major culprit.

    As the phone market in China reaches saturation and sales shrink over all, the country’s hardware makers are pushing hard, and increasingly winning fans, in places like France, Germany, India and Southeast Asia, where consumers find that the phones can do just about everything an iPhone can do at a fraction of the cost.

    Apple sits comfortably atop the market in many countries, including China, for the highest-end handsets. But companies like Huawei have started to do elsewhere what they have done in China, competing with the iPhone on experience and value and luring customers with price comparisons that make them rethink buying Apple’s signature product.

    The cost difference is notable: In China, an iPhone XR starts at around $950, while Huawei’s top-end handsets start at about $600, and Xiaomi’s comparable models start at even less. The iPhone XS starts at around $1,250.

    Companies like Huawei and Oppo have made improvements in features and overall quality that are enticing many wealthy Chinese people, said Mo Jia, an analyst in Shanghai for the technology research firm Canalys. Chinese brands’ aggressive marketing and sales campaigns in Europe indicate that the companies believe consumers there who have traditionally used iPhones will do the same thing.


    A smartphone retail and repair mall in Beijing. Apple sits atop the Chinese market for the highest-end handsets, but companies like Huawei and Oppo have improved their products in ways that are enticing wealthy Chinese buyers.CreditGilles Sabrié for The New York Times

    “Maybe it won’t happen this year or next year,” Mr. Jia said. “But Huawei is going in that direction.”


    In its pursuit of the European market, Huawei (pronounced “HWA-way”), which has its headquarters in Shenzhen and is now the world’s No. 2 seller of smartphones, has gone far beyond the phone store. Huawei has sponsored summer concerts in Greece, teamed up with Lithuania’s basketball federation and backed a “China Festival” in Cologne, Germany. Vivo sponsored last year’s World Cup in Russia.

    Xiaomi (pronounced “SHAO-mee”), which is based in Beijing and was founded in 2010, seemingly came out of nowhere to become the No. 4 mobile brand in Europe early last year, according to Canalys. The gadget maker has also become the top seller of phones in India, in part by opening hundreds of stores in rural areas.

    Clément Blaise, a 25-year-old banker in northern France, has an iPhone for work and a Xiaomi as a personal phone. He said he needed to recharge the Apple device “all the time” but could go two days without charging his Xiaomi.

    “We have this false, preconceived idea that Chinese brands are not as good, that their products are of cheap quality,” Mr. Blaise said. “But the price gap leavens the fears. For 150 euros” — around $170 — “what do you risk anyway?”


    Chinese phone makers have not made similar inroads in the United States. The American government has worked for years to stymie the sale of Huawei’s smartphones and telecom-network equipment, after a congressional inquiry in 2012 deemed Huawei a potential vehicle for cyberspying by the Chinese government. The Trump administration has urged Western allies to do the same.

    Security concerns have not dissuaded some buyers across the Atlantic. Giannis Vassilopoulos, a college student in Athens, said he had been bombarded by Huawei ads during his recent travels around Europe. He said he had bought a Huawei phone because the brand felt more familiar, more European even.


    “Seeing Huawei in the middle of London makes it look immediately more Western,” he said.

    Apple still has a hold on consumers in many places. Announcing the sales slump in China this week, the company’s chief executive, Timothy D. Cook, said Apple expected to set revenue records in wealthier countries like Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, South Korea and Spain and in some emerging markets like Malaysia, Mexico, Poland and Vietnam.

    In China, though, Apple’s market share has been declining, and the company is clinging to the No. 5 spot in smartphone shipments, according to the market research firm Counterpoint. An Apple spokeswoman declined to comment.

    China became the world’s largest smartphone market over the past decade as rising incomes coincided with an explosion in mobile technology.


    People in China rely on handsets in an all-encompassing way, using them to rent bikes, sign into gyms and pay restaurant bills. The market is increasingly saturated, and there are fewer people in China who do not have an advanced device. But there are also new economic reasons to buy locally made goods: Consumers who are replacing or looking to upgrade are dialing back in light of China’s slowdown.

    Shrinking Sales in a Saturated Market
    Demand for smartphones in China has softened considerably in the past year.
    upload_2019-1-5_14-40-47.jpeg

    Today, mainland China’s top smartphone seller is Huawei, whose handset line includes midrange devices and higher-end models with all the latest features. Vivo and Oppo, brands owned by the same Chinese parent company, are next. And then comes Xiaomi, whose phones, smart home devices and even sneakers command a passionate fan base.
    upload_2019-1-5_14-39-31.jpeg

    Samsung of South Korea, which sells more smartphones globally than any other brand, has only around 1 percent of the market in China.

    Feng Yin, a 32-year-old engineer, has an iPhone now, but he is considering switching to a Huawei device.


    Mobile phones on sale at Sin Tat Plaza, in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. Chinese phone makers have not made inroads in the United States similar to those they have made elsewhere.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times
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    Mobile phones on sale at Sin Tat Plaza, in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. Chinese phone makers have not made inroads in the United States similar to those they have made elsewhere.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times
     
    #65 Hendrik_2000, Jan 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
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  6. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    (cont)
    “In the past few years, the technology in Apple’s phones has not had any big breakthroughs, while the technology in domestic phones has gotten better and better,” he said while browsing in a Huawei store in Shanghai on Friday. “The difference is getting smaller.”

    Apple products have long been seen in China as conferring on their owners the ultimate in cachet and cool. But Chinese companies have used slick marketing and celebrity endorsements in hopes of giving their products more personality, while promoting advances in camera technology, battery life and microchips.

    On Friday, Xian Longfei, a restaurant chef, and a friend were at an Oppo store in Shanghai. When it comes to cellphone brands, Mr. Xian, 35, has tried many: Nokia, Motorola, Samsung and three different iPhone models. He switched to an Oppo a few months ago.

    He acknowledges that Apple’s devices still seem better on the whole. But so many of his friends in Shanghai and people in his hometown are Oppo users. And the price — around $400 on sale — was hard to beat.

    Also, he said, holding up his pink handset, “the form factor is pretty.”

    Another factor working against Apple in China is the dominance of WeChat, a messaging, social media and payments app used by more than a billion people. It works on Google’s Android operating system as well as Apple’s, making a phone’s software less of a differentiating factor.

    “Why would people pay such a high price for an iPhone,” asked Kiranjeet Kaur, an analyst for the industry research firm IDC, “if, from a hardware perspective, there isn’t much of an upgrade from Huawei and, from a platform perspective, there’s nothing to lock people in?”

    In Europe, buyers of Chinese brands describe undergoing a sort of conversion. Irritating flaws in their iPhone or Samsung devices lead them to seek alternatives. Presented with unfamiliar Chinese products, they initially have doubts. But after a while, they get hooked.

    Xiaomi’s flagship store in Mong Kok. The company, which is based in Beijing, became the No. 4 mobile brand in Europe early last year and is the top phone seller in India.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

    When Alessandro Del Mastro, 33, bought a Huawei handset in southern Italy three years ago, he was skeptical.

    “My friends teased me that it was not going to last, like most Chinese products, but we were all wrong,” he said.

    Faruk Kaya uses an Apple iPhone and tablet but, as a salesman at a Berlin electronics store, he encounters German customers who prefer Chinese brands.


    “Now you can get a smartphone with the best photo and audio quality for about half the price of an iPhone or a Samsung,” he said.

    Gregory Lauseiro, a telecom executive in Paris, bought his eighth Huawei phone last summer. He has turned his 56-year-old aunt, Christine Jankowski, into a believer, too.

    “I wasn’t really worried about the fact that it was a Chinese brand,” Ms. Jankowski said of her Huawei phone. She added: “We know that they make amazing technological products.

    “If I had to buy a Chinese frying pan, I don’t know,” she said. “But a phone?”
     
    #66 Hendrik_2000, Jan 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  7. Anlsvrthng
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    Anlsvrthng Senior Member
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    That is the key, everything else is just filler.

    The IT (semiconductor industry ) dead, it is as hot like power plant generator manufacturing . No more advancement.
    Reason of the AI and all other marketing mantra.

    Question , what will be the next ? Where will the money/ improvement flow? - I thin we will know after the next recessions : D
     
  8. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    As I said before there is no more driving force in Apple now There will be advancement in smart phone with AI how about instance translation of language that is only possible with 5G network and I bet there many more down the road the key here is the network as is now 4G is come to the end of the road I find the add that exactly described Huawei situation Here it is
     
    #68 Hendrik_2000, Jan 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  9. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Here is the prediction of the future smart phone in China And this time around Apple is not going to be the first time mover via Taishang
    Smartphone Market for 2019
    https://www.caixinglobal.com/2019-0...nas-smartphone-market-for-2019-101366779.html
    By Li Yi / Jan 04, 2019

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    Photo: VCG


    Third-party consulting company International Data Corp. (IDC) on Friday released a list(link in Chinese) of 10 things to watch in China’s smartphone market in the next couple of years. Here is a quick glimpse of what the telecom-industry watcher says:

    1. By 2020, all smartphone manufacturers will create their own unique internet of things (IoT)-internet-developers ecosystem or eco-alliances to embrace the new 5G era.

    2. By 2020, half of all smartphones will have artificial intelligence (AI) functionality — and the functions will be used by enterprises to predict and promote business development on the commercial side.

    3. By 2021, three-quarters of all commercial smartphones will use facial recognition as the primary security verification method — and companies will also launch new business models surrounding this functionality.

    4. In 2019, phone-makers will continue to invest in their respective photo-imaging technologies. A main camera that has 3D and wide-angle/long-focus features will become a standard feature in the flagship models.

    5. By the end of 2019, 15% of all smartphones will be equipped with hardware as well as augmented-reality applications that support 3D modeling. 3D and 5G will be the new “killer combo” of the future.

    6. In 2019, high-performance phones such as gaming phones will continue to lead the market. Models with a large amount of RAM will continue to grow, whereas ROM-capacity escalation will slow down.

    7. In 2019, more than 20% of all phones will have underscreen fingerprint technology.

    8. By the end of 2019, smartphones with OLED screens will comprise over 38% of the market.

    9. In 2022, the average unit price of the overall smartphone market will reach $416 — an increase of 28% compared with 2018 — while the duration of users’ phone replacement cycle will be lengthened.

    10. Smartphone manufacturers will seek to form their own and new brand matrix in the future to please users in a new era. The speed of upgrading mainstream and midpriced products will accelerate, while new retail platforms will be the focus of their investments in sales terminals.

    ***
     
  10. tidalwave
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    tidalwave Senior Member
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    高云半导体累计出货量达到1000万片
    2019年1月3日,中国广州,广东高云半导体科技股份有限公司(以下简称“高云半导体”)宣布,到本月为止,高云半导体已经累计出货FPGA器件一千万片。其中,高云半导体2018年度整体销量成功突破800万片,是2017年的8倍。

    自2017年1月,高云半导体第一次小批量出货几百片,到2018年10月单月销量突破120万片,再到2018年全年销量突破800万片,高云半导体的出货量呈现飞速增长趋势。

    wow, gowinsemi in 2017 first month only sold few hundred chips but in whole year of 2018, it sold 8 million chips.

    And in total, since 2017, it sold about 10 million chips.

    It supplies Field programmable Gate Logic
     
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