Plan Yuan Class Aip & Kilo Submarine Thread

Discussion in 'Navy' started by Jeff Head, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. azesus
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    azesus Junior Member
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    del
     
    #641 azesus, Oct 29, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2018
  2. by78
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    by78 Colonel

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    A high-resolution magazine scan of a Yuan at quayside...

    (2048 x 1498)
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Air Force Brat
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    Air Force Brat Brigadier

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    those "outer doors",,,, "if he opens the outer doors, let him have it!", LOL looks like a black water bug of some sort, water fleas?? is that what those little buggers are called??

    I'm sure its a good boat that's coming along, the torpedo doors in the center?? somebody have an idea for why they have gone that route??
     
  4. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    Two torpedo doors on top, there is another row of four doors just below it.

    This design approach was inherited from the Russians but is also common with Euro SSK designs.
     
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  5. Air Force Brat
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    Air Force Brat Brigadier

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    Thanks Tam, I knew you would bring me up to speed Brother, like I always say, I learn something new everyday here on SDF! so let me ask you another question I have, it looks like the Sonar dome is projected forward of the main pressure vessel?? what am I missing here Brother???

    I knew I was missing what was below the waterline, so six forward torpedo tubes is a lot of firepower, does the Yuan have AIP?

    and how would you compare it to say a French Scorpene.. I know lot of questions, but while I have the expert, you'll prolly have to remind me again, but I'm kind of a submarine nut, but I just don't have the knowledge that I do of aircraft structures and function...
     
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  6. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    First I have to explain because I forgot in the previous post, the reason and advantage of putting torpedo tubes on the bow is that you can fire it while the sub is at maximum speed. If you have to release torpedoes on the side like USN submarines, your submarine has to slow down to tactical speeds. I can see the USN's point since you would be best firing your torpedoes at your quietest speed. But for the Soviets their configuration also makes sense because their submarines will be chasing after NATO convoys. In case if you knew that already, move on.

    If you put your torpedoes in the bow, the size of your bow sonar would be reduced to half. Instead of a full sized spherical sonar filling up the bow, you only have either a spherical or cylindrical sonar about half of the bow. The bigger the sonar, the better it is for passively detecting and resolving lower frequency sounds. That's why the USN wants full spherical bow sonars. But there was also a time when the bow sonar is the only sonar on the submarine. Nowadays there are also flank sonars, and larger flank sonars, or those with longer lines, are meant for deep ocean, and will do better on low frequency. The half sized sonar on the bow of the Yuan does not matter on it so much because the Yuan has large, long flank sonar.

    carlson.png

    On USN subs, they got flank sonars running on top of the sub, which makes them visible on the surface. For SSKs, they need to be on a dry dock before you can see these sonars. Gotland, Scorpene and Type 214.

    gotlandsub.jpg 1044985614.jpg 1200px-S-120_Papanikolis_1.jpg Type-214-01-692x360.jpg

    The Gotland and Scorpene class pic also shows you bow mounted torpedoes.

    typ214_tr_contribution.jpg

    Type 214 cutaway shows you bow mounted torpedo tubes.

    As for AIP, yes, the Yuan is believed to have AIP running on the Stirling principle. As for comparing the Yuan with other SSKs like the Scorpene, the Yuan happens to be fairly large in comparison with most SSKs. It is sandwiched between the Soryu class and the Kilo class. The size points to greater endurance and more of being an ocean going SSK, as opposed to coastal or littoral zone SSK.
     
    #646 Tam, Dec 30, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
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  7. Tirdent
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    Tirdent Junior Member
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    You mean this?

    [​IMG]

    That isn't a flank array but an external duct for the towed sonar - the reel is located inside the forward ballast tank AFAIK. These subs are single-hulled and (unlike most SSKs, which have a smaller hull diameter, so their curvature would be very difficult to walk around on) have no deck fairing within which the cable could be routed.
     
  8. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    Thanks for the correction. Makes sense then that its a duct for the TAS.

    The one on the upper hull of the 093 mod should be a flank sonar. The hump is likely to be storing an extended reel for the TAS, along with being a ballast tank. I would think in the Yuan's case, the TAS reel might also be on the back.


    45900760482_8950043001_k.jpg 2.jpeg
     
  9. by78
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    by78 Colonel

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    Yuan, head-on view...

    (1915 x 2048)
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    New video
    The Submarine Force was founded in 1954 and is one of the three main focuses of the navy, together with the Surface Force and the Naval Air Force. It consists of all submarines, both nuclear- and conventionally-powered, and its main responsibility is to strike major targets underwater, carry out antisubmarine warfare and scout in open water.
     
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