PLAN Torpedos

Discussion in 'Navy' started by TorpHistorian, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. TorpHistorian
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    TorpHistorian New Member

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    What is "reverse-engineering"?

    What is your concept "reverse-engineered"?
    Yu-6 is not the same with Mk 46. Practically all systems are different on design.
    And your statement about transition from Mk 46 mod 2 to Yu-6 is simply ridiculous.
    It as trophy F-4 brought from Vietnam and somebody have created B-1 "by reverse-engineering”.

    Years of hard work were required simply to copy Mk 46. And it at technical support of the torpedo designer.
    Russia also have copied Mk 46, having named torpedo MPT. However, despite all reasonable efforts the torpedo had bad characteristics for a long time.
    To understand volumes and difficulties of process we look your Wiki.
    «The Yu-7 torpedo is composed of over 5,000 parts and 4,500 instruments, while it had over 80,000 blueprints and its technical documents totaled over 100,000 pages. … difficulties encountered in converting the British system to the metric system ».

    Have you got any comprehension about a torpedo design?
    Light torpedoes on Otto-II fuel: Mk 46 (mod 2-7), Mk 54, Yu-7, MPT, MTT.
    Heavyweight torpedoes on Otto-II fuel: NT-37, Mk 48 (mod 2-7), UGST, TT-1, Fizik-1, Yu-6.
    Are you know what the common in these torpedoes and what difference?
     
  2. In4ser
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    In4ser Junior Member

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    Surprised this hasn't been posted already...

    China Tests High-Speed Precision-Guided Torpedo
    BY: Bill Gertz Follow @BillGertz
    November 14, 2013 5:00 am

    China’s navy recently conducted a test of a new high-speed maneuvering torpedo that poses a threat to U.S. ships and submarines.

    Defense officials said the new torpedo is the latest example of what the Pentagon calls Beijing’s anti-access, area-denial, or AA/AD, high-tech weaponry.

    Other new weapons include China’s recently deployed anti-ship ballistic missile, the DF-21D, which is designed to sink U.S. aircraft carriers far from China’s shores.

    China’s military showcased last month another high-tech weapon designed to target Navy ships and submarines. U.S. submarines are considered one of the U.S. military’s most important counter weapons to the AA/AD threat.

    The torpedo test was disclosed on a Chinese blog, a frequent outlet for official leaks of new weapons systems in the Chinese arsenal.

    The blog Tencent, one of China’s largest online outlets, revealed Oct. 15 that China’s navy conducted an underwater test launch of a new precision-guided, maneuvering torpedo in the South China Sea.

    China has been blamed for growing tensions in the South China Sea region over the past several months by asserting claim to nearly 90 percent of the waters, bringing it into potential conflict with Vietnam and Philippines and raising concerns in Indonesia and Malaysia about growing Chinese hegemony.

    The blog post included a series of photos revealing what was described as a new type of high-speed “intelligent” torpedo that sank a 1,000-ton target ship in the test firing.

    “The new-type torpedo that was launched from a long distance and at a great depth nimbly skirted around the jamming ‘acoustic decoy’ and struck right in the middle of the 1,000-ton-plus target ship, sinking it with a loud boom,” the posting reported.

    The report said the new torpedo represents a “leap” for the People’s Liberation Army Navy to “the front ranks of the world.”

    Rick Fisher, a China military affairs expert, said the new torpedo signals a shift in China’s past practice of relying on Soviet-Russian and stolen American technology to build torpedoes.

    China also is said to be using Russian underwater warfare know-how to build a torpedo-killing anti-torpedo. The killer torpedoes are launched against incoming underwater torpedoes that, like the reported new Chinese weapon, are immune to U.S. electronic countermeasures.

    “If China is developing torpedoes that are able to out-fox towed decoys like the U.S. Nixie system, then it becomes more urgent that the U.S. Navy deploy its own ‘anti-torpedo’ torpedo,” said Fisher, senior fellow at the International Assessment and Strategy Center.

    The Nixie system is a ship-towed electronic decoy that simulates the signature of a ship in the water. It is intended to divert homing torpedoes from hitting ships carrying the decoy.

    “The U.S. has had such a [anti-torpedo] system under development for many years, but it now needs to be preserved in time of tighter budgets, and even accelerated,” Fisher said.

    The designation for the new Chinese torpedo and the type of submarine or ship it was fired from were not identified. One photo showed the torpedo fired from a ship. Other photos showed it being loaded on a submarine.

    However, the test was conducted near the South China Sea’s Hainan Island. A tunnel entrance to a coastal submarine base on the island was photographed several years ago by satellites.

    The base is home to China’s new Type 094 attack submarines and the torpedo test was likely fired from the nuclear powered sub.

    The posting said China’s torpedo technology in the past was a “weak area” of military development. But armed with the new “all digital” torpedo, attack submarines will be able to “fight winning battles.”

    According to the blog, the torpedo was fired at a preset course “like a kite that was tethered to the submarine, as it was still receiving real-time instructions from the submarine.”

    Then at a certain point, the torpedo “guidance device” was activated and the torpedo searched for its target. Within minutes it “automatically adjusted the attack depth and started to charge toward the target ship at a greater speed, successfully piercing the target!” the report said.

    The torpedo pierced the target four times before its high-explosive warhead exploded, sinking the ship.

    A draft congressional report on China’s military to be released in its final form later this month said China is rapidly building up its naval forces, especially submarines. According to the Office of Naval Intelligence, China by 2020 will have between 59 and 64 diesel-electric submarines, between six and nine nuclear attack submarines, and between four and five ballistic missile submarines.

    The Chinese navy is currently building at least seven classes of new submarines and warships, more than any other nation in the world except the United States.

    “The PLA Navy’s growing inventory of modern nuclear and conventional submarines will significantly enhance China’s ability to strike opposing surface ships throughout the Western Pacific and to protect its future sea-based nuclear deterrent patrollers and aircraft carrier task groups,” the draft report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission stated.

    Overall, the Chinese buildup “presents significant challenges to U.S. security interests in Asia” and is on track to “alter the security balance in Asia over the next five to 10 years, challenging decades of U.S. military preeminence.”

    “First and foremost, major elements of this program—such as the DF-21D antiship ballistic missile and increasing numbers of advanced submarines armed with antiship cruise missiles—are designed to restrict U.S. freedom of action throughout the Western Pacific,” the report said.

    “As the PLA’s anti-access/area denial capabilities mature, the costs and risks to the United States for intervention in a potential regional conflict involving China will increase.”

    Source: China Tests High Speed Precision Guided Torpedo
     
    #32 In4ser, Nov 14, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  3. volleyballer
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    volleyballer Banned Idiot

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    I read that article but I seriously doubt its credibility. The overall tone of the article is meant to incite fear of the unknown. It's quite ridiculous really. Also, "the blog Tencent"? Massive lulz ensues ...
     
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  4. delft
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    delft Brigadier

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    I wonder how China can have between four and five ballistic missile submarines.
     
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  5. adeptitus
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    adeptitus Captain
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    As a China military affairs expert, Mr. Fisher should be aware that the US had supplied torpedoes to China in 1978-1992, including licensed local production?

    U.S. Confirms Sale to China of Top-Line Anti-Sub Torpedoes - Los Angeles Times

    China also purchased the Alenia A244-S torpedo from Italy in the 1980s.
     
    #35 adeptitus, Nov 18, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  6. nicky
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    nicky Junior Member

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    Hello to All,

    What's known about torpedo manufacturers? I noticed only reference to the "two factories" in Wiki", is that correct? Where are they?
    And also about test stations: there's a reference to a lake station (stations?) and deep water sea trials (Hainan or Dalian? or both?)? Any knowledge about those?
    Thanks,
    Nicky
     
  7. Blackstone
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    Blackstone Brigadier

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    So what if China developed countermeasures against 1980s US torpedoes? Does PLAN actually believe US and her allies would employ them today?
     
  8. Bltizo
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    Bltizo Moderator
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    I don't think anyone believes that the main usefulness in honour torpedoes was to allow the PLAN to develop countermeasures against them, rather it gave china a massive boost in developing its own torpedoes allowing it to catch up much much faster.
     
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  9. tphuang
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    tphuang Brigadier
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    A couple of updates here. First one looks to be a new light torpedo that can be launched from ship. This at least to me looks like an improvement over Yu-7. It's longer, with a more hydro dynamically shaped head and pumpjet propellers. Not sure the designation but everything up to Yu-10 is already taken I think.

    The second one is the first time I've seen a missile launched from 054A that does not look like HQ-16. I'm calling it Yu-8 for now, because I don't know of any other missiles that they've designed to be launched from its VLS, but that's just a guess.
     

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  10. Bltizo
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    Bltizo Moderator
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    The geometry of the missile definitely resembles previously known ASROCs that were developed, namely the CY-1. I wouldn't be surprised if the 054A's current ASROC is derived from it in some way.

    [​IMG]
     
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