PLAN Littoral ASW Capability

Discussion in 'Navy' started by shen, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Are you saying Minnie Chan lie? because here what she said
    China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) said underwater precision positioning tests conducted by its No 716 Research and Development Institute in waters off Lianyungang in Jiangsu province, proved that it had overcome a number of core technical problems with the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System.

    CSIC, China’s biggest state-owned naval shipbuilder, said the tests showed that the BeiDou system could not only provide accurate and consistent positioning data to underwater vessels, but could also send tracking and positioning information from underwater devices to shore-based and surface stations.
     
  2. mys_721tx
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    mys_721tx Junior Member
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    Yes. Beidou works on E band, which is a microwave frequency and only penetrates few millimeters of water, much less than periscope depths. As great as the scientists are, they are not going to defy physics. If the 716th did say or make something, the underwater segment will have nothing to do with Beidou. I suspect it is related to an acoustics based system tested in 2018 but there is no public source related to the 716th on that project either.

    How Minnie Chan mixed those up is not a question I can answer.
     
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  3. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Via Icloo finally a 10 ton ASW heli that can carry plenty sonobuoy, onboard sonar computer And heavy lift for medium torp, better range and loiter time
    A Z20 mock up with folded rotor blades has been sighted on a type 055 destroyer under out-fitting, which indicate a naval variant of Z20 is ready to be stationed on type 055, type 052DG and type 071 LPD.

    Interesting remark on Huitong's Chinese Military Aviation, described it as Z20F?, a ASW version that first flew in late 2018.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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  5. by78
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    by78 Colonel

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    Sino-SURTASS.

    (2048 x 1429)
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Via Emperor
    https://www.scmp.com/news/china/sci...-scientists-develop-ai-technology-help-detect

    Chinese, US scientists develop AI technology to help detect submarines in uncharted waters

    Researchers say system should allow them to track any sound-emitting source – from nuclear subs to whales – using a simple listening device mounted on a buoy, underwater drone or ship

    Breakthrough builds on previous work by team from Beijing and San Diego

    Stephen Chen
    Published: 9:00am, 31 Aug, 2019

    Scientists from China and the United States have developed a new artificial intelligence-based system that they say will make it easier to detect submarines in uncharted waters.

    The technology builds on earlier work by the team, led by Dr Niu Haiqiang from the Institute of Acoustics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, which saw them develop a deep-learning algorithm that could improve the speed and precision of detection.

    The algorithm, however, needs a large amount of data to work, so its use is limited to waters that have already been fully charted. In contrast, the upgrade works in all waters, charted or otherwise.

    Niu and his colleagues, who included scientists from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, started by developing a simulator to generate a wide range of virtual environments from which the algorithm was able to learn.

    Once it had assimilated that information, the simulator was able to analyse real-life data taken from the world’s oceans and seas, the team said in a paper published in the July issue of The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

    It is now able to help a single hydrophone locate more than 80 per cent of underwater targets within an uncharted area with a margin of error of less than 10 metres (33 feet), the paper said.

    The researchers said the new technology should allow them to track any sound-emitting source – be it a nuclear submarine, a whale or even an emergency beeper from a crashed aircraft – using a simple listening device mounted on a buoy, underwater drone or ship.

    The scientists worked together to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of passive underwater surveillance technology, according to the academy’s website.

    Locating targets in unfamiliar waters is challenging because the AI relies on environmental data parameters such as underwater currents and seabed landscapes. But obtaining such information is not easy, and often impossible.

    For instance, the United States does not allow China to collect information in waters close to its west coast, while Beijing forbids the US from getting too close to its military facilities in the South China Sea.

    Professor Zhang Renhe, a researcher at the Institute of Acoustics who was not involved in the study, said the latest development was encouraging.

    “AI can be a useful assistant to underwater target recognition,” he said. “In a way it is similar to the speech recognition technology on our mobile phones.”

    But he said scientists were still wrestling with exactly how the technology worked.
    “It is like a black box with some inner workings that are still unexplained,” he said.

    Researchers were now working on ways to combine the new AI technology with the physical models for underwater target detection that have been developed in recent decades, Zhang said.

    “This is a new frontier for fundamental science,” he said. “It requires international cooperation.”
     
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  7. Jono
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    Jono New Member
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  8. Jono
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    Jono New Member
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    but I fear international cooperation especially Sino-American one won't be forthcoming anymore given the present political tension and tech rivalry
     
  9. by78
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    by78 Colonel

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    A pair of Sino-SURTASS.

    (2048 x 1429)
    [​IMG]
     
  10. asif iqbal
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    asif iqbal Brigadier

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    Look too square

    How many of these has China built 3 so far ?
     
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