PLAN Catapult Development Thread, News, etc.

Discussion in 'Navy' started by antiterror13, Dec 24, 2011.

  1. Jura
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    Jura Lieutenant General

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    LOL now noticed
    @HenriKenhmann
    had tweeted apparently the same picture, just tilted:
    [​IMG]
    https://twitter.com/HenriKenhmann/status/936622954888052738
    East Pendulum‏@HenriKenhmann Dec 1




    L'image satellite datant du 1er Novembre montre que les essais de catapultage électromagnétique (~EMALS) à Xingcheng avec le chasseur embarqué J-15 continuent.

    Translated from French by Bing
    Satellite image from 1 November shows that electromagnetic catapult test (~ EMALS) Xingcheng with embedded Hunter J - 15 continue.
     
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  2. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    :D,now the narrow one is EMALS
     
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  3. Jura
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    Jura Lieutenant General

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    now noticed the tweet https://twitter.com/HenriKenhmann/status/980810185290625024
    East Pendulum‏ @HenriKenhmann 4h4 hours ago




    Ces marquages au sol existent depuis longtemps mais c'est la première fois qu'on les voit clairement. Le prochain porte-avions chinois, un CATOBAR, aurait donc au moins 3 sinon 4 catapultes à vapeur ou EMALS. Image du 1er Novembre 2017.

    Translated from French by Microsoft
    These ground markings have been around for a long time but this is the first time they have been clearly seen. The next Chinese aircraft carrier, a catobar, would have at least 3 if not 4 steam catapults or with emals. Picture of November 1, 2017.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Intrepid
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    Intrepid Senior Member

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    50 meters width at the front edge? An aircraft carrier of the Nimitz class is there only 25 meters wide. The catapults are farther apart than they will be on a ship.
     
  5. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    I think you should not count the total width of these markings as the dimension of the Carrier's bow, but rather the individual shapes shown below. The markings apparently represents two flight decks side by side (with one being mirrored).
    catapult.jpg
     
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  6. Viktor Jav
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    Viktor Jav Junior Member
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    Nor should it be expected for the catapults to be laid out perpendicular to each other on the carrier, on all existing catapult equipped carriers the catapults are angled in order to save space.
     
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  7. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    Yes, and even more, I don't think the markings mean much regarding dimension and placement on the real carrier. It may just serve some purpose for ground training.
     
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  8. Wakingbake
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    Wakingbake New Member
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    China's new electromagnetic rocket more powerful than most conventional artillery on Qinghai-Tibet plateau: expert
    Source
    Global Times
    Editor
    Huang Panyue
    Time
    2018-08-03
    A+-

    China's unprecedented innovation of electromagnetic catapult rocket artillery technology will render the weapon more powerful than most conventional artillery, especially in Qinghai-Tibet plateau areas, Chinese experts said on Thursday.

    Han Junli, a research fellow at a Beijing-based research center under the People's Liberation Army (PLA), is leading the development of the electromagnetic rocket artillery, inspired by Ma Weiming, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering dubbed "the father of the Chinese electromagnetic catapult," Science and Technology Daily reported.

    Han reportedly mentioned a military incident that occurred in a border region on a plateau in Southwest China, where he saw the potential necessity of deploying rocket artillery.

    China has large plateau and mountainous areas where rocket artillery could destroy invading forces from hundreds of kilometers away without soldiers crossing mountains, Han said, according to the newspaper.

    "Conventional artillery that uses powder may suffer from lack of oxygen on plateaus," Song Zhongping, a military expert and TV commentator, told the Global Times on Thursday.

    "Artillery that uses an electromagnetic catapult will not need to face the same problem. This makes it very valuable in warfare on plateaus."

    When using electromagnetic force for the initial boost instead of an explosive powder, shells fly smoother and hit targets more accurately, Song said.

    Electromagnetic rocket artillery can easily reach targets beyond 200 kilometers at a relatively lower cost than conventional artillery, Song said.

    Han's research has made an important technological breakthrough and the development plan is becoming a reality, the Beijing-based newspaper said.

    Using an electromagnetic catapult for rocket artillery is an unprecedented innovation, Science and Technology said.

    "China needs to not only develop weapon concepts that are already available to the world, but also explore new, not-yet-present weapons to lead the frontier of technology development," Song said.

    Electromagnetic rocket artillery is not the only Chinese military equipment using electromagnetic technology.

    Another is the electromagnetic railgun, which can fire projectiles via electromagnetic force at an incredible destructive velocity.

    It is expected to be mounted on China's first domestically developed 10,000-ton class missile destroyer 055 in the future.

    Another example is the electromagnetic catapult system widely expected to be used on China's future aircraft carriers.

    An electromagnetic catapult will allow more fighter jets to take off in a shorter time and boost the carrier's combat capabilities.

    The catapult can also launch heavier fixed-wing planes including airborne early warning and control aircraft. They can gather more battlefield information in the sky and act as an airborne command center by coordinating vessels into a stronger strike force, say experts.
     
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  9. MwRYum
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    MwRYum Captain

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    Wait...isn't the propellent charge is a self-contained package that pack everything include oxidizer, so much so that you can fire a gun in hard vacuum? If so, it's less relevant concerning the lesser oxygen content in the environment, right?

    However, I can see the merit of railgun or coilgun in those regions, mainly a logistical one - without the need for propellent charge, more ammo can be pulled by the same truckload, this is critical because we do know that internal combustion engines produce less horsepower at higher altitude.
     
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  10. Skywatcher
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    Skywatcher Senior Member

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    Could work for tube artillery as well, I imagine.
     
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