Osama Bin Laden has been killed

Discussion in 'Members' Club Room' started by ToxSic, May 1, 2011.

  1. SteelBird
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    SteelBird Major

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    Well, I didn't read this thread from the beginning nor do I followed it closely. I have a simple and quick question to you guys who have followed the story tightly that what happens to the tail of a mysterious halo used in the operation of hunting Bin Laden? It looks damaged seriously while the crew in it were all safe?
     
  2. kwaigonegin
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    kwaigonegin Colonel

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    I was in lower Manhattan early this week. Ran over to G.Z and took some of these shots. Because these are my personal pictures I kindly asked that you don't copy them... thanks

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    Soon to be 'Marine 1' and backup choppers doing practice runs to NYC on Tues for Obama's visit to G.Z on Thursday
     
  3. gambit
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    gambit New Member

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    You mean because of Saddam Hussein. Keep in mind the billions spent on palaces during the sanction years. Or how about the scandalous Oil-For-Food program. Despite its name, plenty of non-food related items was allowed in OFF. The program was not managed by US but by the UN. During the sanction years, the US was Iraq's largest singular buyer of Iraqi oil for OFF, not because we needed Iraqi oil. The money was deposited into an escrow account that was also managed by the UN, not US. With the exception of the US, Saddam played everyone on the UN Security Council as far as OFF goes. Any wonder why today China benefit quite well in Iraqi oil contracts?
     
  4. deltat
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    deltat Just Hatched
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    Read La Cosa Nostra, Google Knol, by Thomas Deflo. There are worse threats to Western democracy than bin Laden.
     
  5. ccL1
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    ccL1 New Member

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    The Pakistani military has already taken the intact rotor section to an undisclosed location and children have been gathering the shards of the composite material of the helicopter.

    No doubt, I know of a few countries who would be very interested in inspecting these pieces.
     
  6. MwRYum
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    MwRYum Captain

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    By what the US official claims, the crashed helo made a rough landing inside the courtyard and clipped off the tail, crew and SEALs onboard still combat capable, and the team switch to "Plan B" mode (whatever that is they didn't say) right off from there. Once they nailed OBL and grabbed the "AQ operation playbook" and what not, the other helos came pick them up and OBL body, but before they left they destroyed the crashed helo as thoroughly as they could, alas left the tail rotor outside the compound.

    The Pakistani military hauled off the tail rotor in the morning, and the US now of course wants it back. Rumor has it that the Chinese is very interested in it.
     
  7. i.e.
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    i.e. Senior Member

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    The end result is still the same.
    good intentions do not mean good results.

    oh btw Food for Oil was established in 95. for the purpose to alleviate the effect of sanctions on civilians.
    before that you still had the massive sanctions against Iraq.
    Sanctions like these are based on the logic that one can make a regime change by make its people's life so miserable ( by depravation of civil goods )that they will rise up and revolt thus topple of regime.

    This logic is almost same one strategic bombing is based on: that one can make a regime change by make its people's life so miserable ( by massive aerial bombardment of civilian population ) that they will rise up and revolt thus topple of regime.

    This logic is also the same one terrorists use: that one can make a political change by make its people's life so miserable ( by acts of terror against a civilian population ) that they will rise up and demand a political change.

    see the parallels?

    I guess some acts of deprivation against civilians are more acceptable if one can label a regime "evil" and starve and bomb instead of using individual acts of terror.
    and that it is the big and powerful that does it.

    If one analyzes from a purely utilitarian view, then I would say what we call "terrorism" actually has more utility. because it actually kills far less people (instead of mass starvation and death by strategic bombing, which historically has had far far more victims than terrorist acts) to achieve a political change.

    But some how one is more acceptable in international civility than the other.

    for the record: I am against any acts of depravation against a civilian population: either with terror, aerial bombardment, or sanctions.

    there is a far more effective way to settle differences: we can make the politicans having duels with each other, instead of try to make innocent people kill other innocent people.

    for example: GWB could have a pistol duel with OBL. I am sure GWB will win. that is far less costly than the two wars and however many killed.
     
    #117 i.e., May 7, 2011
    Last edited: May 7, 2011
  8. AssassinsMace
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    AssassinsMace Brigadier

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    China benefits from Iraqi oil contracts because Western companies won't take the risks not because of corruption.
     
  9. Finn McCool
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    Finn McCool Captain
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    I like the sound of that. He would have been elected President-for-Life if he won hehe
     
  10. Scratch
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    Scratch Captain

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    Looking a bit ahead now what that death means for AQ and the political situation.
    AQ confirmed OBL's death, but besides the usual revange trolling didn't say much else so far. While it's localized suborganisations will most likely continue activity in their respective spheres of influence, the AQ Inc. may face some challanges. There's the old guard that rose with OBL, and also young, rising figureheads in the movement who may want to succed him. I wonder if there might be some friction in the succession process. During it's rise in the past AQ has attracted terror cells with different agendas and these may now clash actually.
    The natural choice for succession would seem Ayman al-Sawahiri, #2 and chief ideologist, although he's widely portrayed as lacking the charisma of a OBL necessary to integrate the different parts of the organisation. There's still a few other high-profile options, though.
    One of them, Anwar al-Awlaki, was attacked by US drones in Yemen today, but survived. The pressure on the leadership is tremendeous already, and will probably grow with new intel gathered in the raid. Some may even be reluctant to step up to a more important position. There may be a chance to severly cripple the organisation right now.
    Impact on the Taliban part of the problem is probably not so big. But maybe it'll highlight a few connections.
     

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