J-20 5th Gen Fighter Thread VI

Discussion in 'Air Force' started by siegecrossbow, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. antiterror13
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    antiterror13 Colonel

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    5 years away ... is a fair assessment, I agree
     
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  2. TerraN_EmpirE
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    TerraN_EmpirE Tyrant King

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    If you wish to break it down like that might I point out that Yankee has three contexts.
    1) I am a Yankee. Being from the United States can be inferred as a Yankee.
    2) I am a Yankee, being from the Northeastern states of the United States particularly the New England states.
    3) In Japanese sub culture the Yankii are sometimes gangs particularly routed in the Kansai region of Japan noted for counterculture embracing of America styles including died hair over the top hair long coats and a unique sitting position. Often associated with motorcycle culture. When I hear Yankeesama I think it’s more likely Yankiisama.
     
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  3. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    The first two are well-known.

    The 3rd about sub culture is new to me, but not surprising as Yankii is the romanization of Japanese scripts "ヤンキー" which is the Japanese approximation of Yankee.

    Sama is the Japanese reading of word 様 which means style/type/shape.

    So the meaning is "American Style".

    Interesting to decipher :D
     
  4. Deino
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    Deino Brigadier
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    J-20A with pylon ! ...

    via @huitong

    J-20A with pylon.jpg
     
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  5. Air Force Brat
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    Air Force Brat Brigadier

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    Yes Sir, neat, what would you guess they have hanging under there Deino, a pod?? looks like another on the left wing?? or not?

    I would add that looking down on the J-20's smallish aft mounted delta wing, we can see the total lift contributed by those large canards and the lifting body fuselage, those two features add immeasurably to the J-20's total lift production, reducing drag from a larger main wing.
     
  6. dawn_strike
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    dawn_strike New Member
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    Well I guess not. One character can have totally different meanings in Japanese kanji system and in Chinese. 'Sama' is a respectful title, something like 'Your Highness' ,‘lord’ and ‘your Excellency’. It is used to call someone you admire and adore and/or someone with a higher position.
     
  7. dawn_strike
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    dawn_strike New Member
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    Another thing is that Yankee can refer to ‘Y’ in tactical codes , just like you can read 'a' as 'alpha' and 'b' as 'bravo', etc.
    He himself once admitted that 'yankee' in his name has no further meaning than 'Y'...He simply chose this name in an English class when he was at school, so that he would not be the first one to be picked up when his teacher wanted to have a roll call or required somebody for something like answering questions... lol

    So generally 'yankeesama' is simply something like 'Mr. Y'.
     
  8. TerraN_EmpirE
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    TerraN_EmpirE Tyrant King

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    Could also throw in the New York Yankees...
     
  9. jimmyjames30x30
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    jimmyjames30x30 New Member
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    You are both right and wrong. Japanese are like English, which borrows from different linguistic elements from off shore. It's a rather complex language because it has a mix of different origins. Thus there are interesting things like having different readings for the same Kanji, aka. On-yomi and Kun-yomi.

    For the Kanji "様", most of its usage in On-yomi readings are exactly the same as the character in Chinese.
    i.e.:
    • 様 【ヨウ】 appearing ..., looking ..., way to ..., method of ...ing, form, style, design, like, similar to, thing (thought or spoken)
    • 様式 【ヨウシキ】 style, form, pattern
    • 文様 【モンヨウ】 pattern, design
    • 一様 【イチヨウ】 uniform, equal, even, the same, identical, common, ordinary, usual
    The usage as an honorific arise from its Kun-yomi readings, i.e:
    • 様 【さま】 Mr., Mrs., Miss, Ms., makes words more polite (usu. in fixed expressions), state, situation, appearance
    • 様変わり 【さまがわり】 changing completely, transformation
    • 殿様 【とのさま】 feudal lord, daimyo
    • ご馳走様 【ごちそうさま】 thank you (for the meal), that was a delicious meal, thank you (for displaying lovey-dovey behaviour)
    • 唐行きさん 【からゆきさん】 karayuki-san, young Japanese women who were sent to work (mainly as prostitutes) in foreign countries, esp. in Southeast Asia (Meiji to early Showa)
    • 愛様 【いとさん】 daughter (of a good family)
    However, if you look at the phrase "様変わり 【さまがわり】", you will notice that even though with its Kun-yomi reading "sama", the Kanji still carry the same meaning as its Chinese counterpart.

    To me, at least this suggests that although the usage of the kanji "様" as an honorific is only found in Japanese and not in Chinese, this unique Japanese usage might still have etymologically evolved from the same original Chinese meaning.

    The definitions are quoted from Jisho.org
     
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  10. dawn_strike
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    dawn_strike New Member
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    Right, you are right. But I take it as an honorific because he admitted that he was indeed using it as an honorific. He said that he got 'sama' in his name because he was a fan of Japanese anime. In animation, using an honorific to call oneself is a way to highlight the role as a proud, hot-blooded or uninhabited character.

    Anyway let's give this little discussion a cut-off here, for it is faaaaaaaaaaaaar off the topic LOL
     
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