Is the US shooting itself in the foot by banning Huawei?

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by AndrewS, Dec 8, 2018.

  1. antiterror13
    Offline

    antiterror13 Major

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    3,978
    Likes Received:
    4,312
    true @plawolf

    But better to switch now than getting harder and harder later. The problem with iPhone that I hate it very much ... we have no control with our own data
     
    Equation likes this.
  2. PiSigma
    Offline

    PiSigma "the engineer"

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,324
    Likes Received:
    1,379
    Cut your losses now. And if you get a cheap android phone like OnePlus, the savings can pay for all the money you sink into the apple ecosystem.
     
  3. Tam
    Offline

    Tam Senior Member
    Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    2,122

    This sounds like something perfectly up the EU's alley, if the EU isn't doing such investigations already.

    EU poses an even bigger threat to US internet and tech giants with many regulation and anti trust, tax evasion, and privacy data investigations and fines.
     
  4. Tam
    Offline

    Tam Senior Member
    Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    2,122
    NY Times Op Ed piece. "Why My Chinese Dad switched from an iPhone to a Huawei".

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/05/opinion/sunday/apple-china.html


    If you want my phone opinion and taste, I would pick Huawei over iPhone without batting a single eyelid. I would pick Huawei over Samsung too. Anytime. Any day. I will put my money on it, no contract needed, just pure prepaid unlock phone. But line is drawn over Google Pixel and Xiaomi phones. I also have a very favorable impression with the top end Oppo and Vivo phones, and the top end Nokia.
     
    antiterror13 and KIENCHIN like this.
  5. weig2000
    Offline

    weig2000 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    1,838
    The Increasingly Toxic Political Climate for American Analysts of US-China Relations
    Anyone critical of the hardening U.S. approach to China is now facing attack. That doesn’t bode well for U.S. policymaking.

    By Mark J. Valencia
    January 04, 2019

    Well-known economist Jeffrey Sachs has criticized the United States for having Canada detain executive Meng Wanzhou of China’s telecommunications giant Huawei. He argued in international media that this was hypocritical because U.S. law enforcement did not take similar action against executives of American companies for the same alleged violation of U.S. sanctions on Iran. Sachs also opined that the United States was “the greatest threat to the international rule of law.”

    While controversial, he is certainly not alone in this view. But for expressing it, Sachs was swarmed with personal insults on social media, including the suggestion that his opinion was “bought.” Most attacked him personally or criticized China’s behavior in this and other spheres rather than rationally rebutting his view. This phenomenon is becoming far more common than is generally acknowledged and bodes ill for a healthy democratic system and its salient policymaking. Indeed, anti-China American researchers and pundits are becoming increasingly emboldened and shrill as they subtly attempt to intimidate those with contrarian views.

    The suppression or exclusion of contrarian views in the decision-making process undermines good governance and is downright dangerous in a country that aspires to be a model for the rest of the world. Government policymakers need the best advice they can get to make decisions that affect the security of a country and its citizens, as well as the world. To provide that best advice, advisers to policymakers need to consider a wide range of policy options and their implications before narrowing the decision choices. To suppress contrarian views predetermines the range of research and possible responses to such issues and is not in a country’s best national security interest. However, that may be just what is happening in the U.S. community of policy analysts that focuses on U.S.-China relations.

    Indeed, with U.S. President Donald Trump’s “America First” policy permeating some sections of society and the government, and U.S.-China relations rapidly deteriorating, analysts of that relationship are coming under increasing pressure to toe the increasingly strident U.S. line. Put bluntly, policymakers may not be getting “the straight dope” and feasible alternatives may be buried in a summary slanted toward the perceived preferences of the advisers and policymakers. This is a road the United States has been down before and should not want to go down again. Indeed, some think this is one reason why the United States has recently wound up in so many disastrous foreign misadventures.

    Most objective analysts welcome and enjoy the give and take of substantive academic debate. It improves the analysis and thus provides better advice to decision makers. But that’s not what this is about. This is about personal attacks, intimidation, censorship, and “blacklisting.” This stems in good part from the growing influence of China hawks in the government and the analytical community and their public attacks on certain viewpoints and their progenitors. As Tom Plate puts it, “there is a posse of American pundits who have no positive word for Beijing and seem to be gunning for war.”

    Now officials at the highest level of government are creating a climate that can only encourage such attacks. In a cold war-like speech, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence has warned that the “Chinese Communist Party is rewarding or coercing American … universities, think tanks, scholars, [and] journalists… ”

    The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency has detailed “China’s far-reaching foreign influence operations in the U.S.” particularly those targeting academics.

    FBI Director Christopher Wray says that “naiveté on the part of the academic sector” has aggravated the risks of China’s influence in the academic world. “I think it’s going to take a whole of society response by us,” Wray added.

    Hopefully Wray is not hinting at a government-encouraged, society-wide wave of intimidation of views that differ from that of the current government policy. But whether intended or not, such statements embolden those who would cast aspersions on — and even censor and blacklist – scholars whose analysis and conclusions they do not like.

    As former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd recently observed, “We need to be wary of the emergence of any form of new McCarthyism, whereby anyone seeking to explain the complexity” of U.S.-China relations is simply accused of “Un-American activities.”

    “There are already tremors of this emerging around the edges of the foreign and strategic policy community including think tanks and the academy,” Rudd adds.

    It makes one wonder if anything critical of the U.S. position vis-a-vis China is considered by these China hawks in and outside of government as Chinese “propaganda,” “sympathizing” with the “enemy” or — worse for an analyst’s reputation – the slanting of views for money. For America’s sake, I certainly hope that is not so.

    Mark J. Valencia is an Adjunct Senior Scholar at the National Institute for South China Sea Studies, Haikou, China.
     
  6. Hendrik_2000
    Offline

    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,834
    Likes Received:
    23,155
    Ever onward Huawei no retreat keep focus on what you do best Technology
    Huawei on Monday also released its TaiShan series of servers powered by the new chipset, built for big data, distributed storage and ARM native applications.

    The firm founded chip designer HiSilicon in 2004 to help reduce its reliance on imports.

    In modem chips, Huawei internally sources 54 percent of those in its own devices, with 22 percent coming from Qualcomm Inc and the remainder from elsewhere, showed evidence presented at an antitrust trial for Qualcomm.

    https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/...-taps-growth-channels-021806102--finance.html
    China's Huawei launches server chipset as it taps new growth channels
    By Sijia Jiang,Reuters 58 minutes ago

    By Sijia Jiang

    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] on Monday launched a new chipset for use in servers, at a time when China is pushing to enhance its chip-making capabilities and reduce its heavy reliance on imports, especially from the United States.

    Huawei, which derives the bulk of its revenue from selling telecommunications equipment and smartphones, is seeking growth avenues in cloud computing and enterprise services as its equipment business comes under increased scrutiny in the West wary of Chinese government influence over the firm. Huawei has repeatedly denied any such influence.

    Chinese firms are also seeking to minimize the impact of a trade dispute which has seen China and the United States slap tariffs on each other's technology imports.

    For Huawei, the launch of the chipset - called the Kunpeng 920 and designed by subsidiary HiSilicon - boosts its credentials as a semiconductor designer.

    The Shenzhen-based company already makes the Kirin series of smartphone chips used in its high-end phones, and the Ascend series of chipsets for artificial intelligence computing launched in October.

    It said its latest 7 nanometre, 64-core central processing unit (CPU) would provide much higher computing performance for data centers and slash power consumption. It is based on the architecture of British chip design firm ARM - owned by Japan's SoftBank Group Corp <9984.T> - which is seeking to challenge the dominance in server CPUs of U.S. maker Intel Corp .

    Huawei aims to "drive the development of the ARM ecosystem", said Chief Marketing Officer William Xu. He said the chip has "unique advantages in performance and power consumption".

    Xu also said Huawei will continue its "long-term strategic partnership" with Intel.

    Huawei on Monday also released its TaiShan series of servers powered by the new chipset, built for big data, distributed storage and ARM native applications.

    The firm founded chip designer HiSilicon in 2004 to help reduce its reliance on imports.

    In modem chips, Huawei internally sources 54 percent of those in its own devices, with 22 percent coming from Qualcomm Inc and the remainder from elsewhere, showed evidence presented at an antitrust trial for Qualcomm.


    (Reporting by Sijia Jiang; Editing by Anne Marie Roantree and Christopher Cushing)
     
    N00813, Equation, Yodello and 6 others like this.
  7. Dolcevita
    Online

    Dolcevita Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2007
    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    1,401
    lol. yep. no occurrence of "Huawei" inside on the AT&T 5G network.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/7/18172355/att-fake-5g-logo-rolling-out-samsung-lg

    AT&T misleads customers by updating phones with fake 5G icon
    These phones don’t connect to 5G networks
    By Jacob Kastrenakes@jake_k Jan 7, 2019, 1:59pm EST


    [​IMG]
    AT&T has updated three smartphones from Samsung and LG to make them show 5G connectivity logos, even though none of them are capable of connecting to 5G networks.

    Now, when the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active, LG V30, or LG V40 are connected to portions of AT&T’s LTE network that have received some speed-boosting updates, they’ll show an icon that says “5G E” instead of “LTE.”

    That “E” in the “5G” logo is supposed to tip you off that this isn’t real 5G — just some marketing nonsense. But there’s no way of knowing that just from looking at the logo. The “E” is smaller than the rest of the icon. And even if you do learn that “5G E” stands for “5G Evolution,” it isn’t immediately clear what that means.

    Coming to more devices this spring
    To win the 5G marketing wars, AT&T has decided to brand portions of its LTE network as “5G Evolution.” These portions of AT&T’s network have received speed-boosting upgrades and should be faster than typical LTE, but AT&T isn’t doing anything that other carriers haven’t already implemented. And these are still, by definition, LTE technologies — not 5G ones. So this is exclusively about marketing, not about improving your phone.

    The speeds on this network aren’t even that impressive. AT&T says 5G E connectivity will reach average real-world speeds of around 40Mbps. That’s not out of line with what you’d get in a city on AT&T or other major carriers today.

    AT&T plans to add the 5G E icon to more phones this spring, but it didn’t immediately say which ones. AT&T offers a total of 17 devices right now can take advantage of “5G E” technologies, and it says its “5G E” network will be available in 400 markets within “the coming days.”
     
  8. Tam
    Offline

    Tam Senior Member
    Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    2,122
  9. Jura
    Offline

    Jura Lieutenant General

    Top Poster Of Month

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    19,869
    Likes Received:
    25,702
    LOL! you made a good joke, I mean it

    managers should've been more careful about their “5G Evolution”
     
    Equation likes this.
  10. Hendrik_2000
    Offline

    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,834
    Likes Received:
    23,155
    Here is more about Kunpeng chip from Huawei via JSch

    Huawei introduces high-performance ARM-based CPU
    By Ma Si | chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2019-01-07 11:35

    [​IMG]
    Xu Wenwei,chief strategy marketing officer at Huawei, unveils Kunpeng 920 in Shenzhen on January 7. [Photo/chinadaily.com.cn]

    Huawei Technologies Co Ltd unveiled a high-performance chip for servers on Tuesday to reduce reliance on foreign suppliers such as Intel Corp, amid its ongoing push to expand presence in the semiconductor sector.

    The central processing unit, called Kunpeng 920, is based on the ARM architecture. It is designed to better meet the exponentially growing demand for bigger computing capabilities in data centers while offering lower power consumption.

    Xu Wenwei, chief strategy marketing officer at Huawei, said no single architecture can meet all computing demands and the company aims to move toward a more diversified computing power world.

    "Kunpeng 920 is arguably the world's best high-performance ARM-based CPU," Xu said, "from the moment on, the saying that the ARM design is not good at processing data becomes invalid."

    The move also marks that Huawei has joined the ranks of players such as Qualcomm Inc to challenge the dominant position of Intel's x86 architecture in server chips.


    Designed on the basis of ARM architecture, Kunpeng 920 feature far lower power consumption than Intel's X86-based processors, which can greatly help reduce energy costs.

    Power consumption accounts for around 30 to 50 percent of IT costs, Li Guanyu, deputy head of the informatization and software service department at the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, said in an earlier interview.

    "As the demand for real-time data processing capabilities will surge in future, the global industry desires high-efficiency, low-energy and low-cost servers," Li added.

    Huawei Rolls 7nm ARM Server CPU | EE Times
    Kunpeng 920 said to outperform ThunderX2, Ampere by 25%
    By Rick Merritt, 01.06.19

    SAN JOSE, Calif. – Huawei announced a 7nm Arm-based server CPU it claims outperforms rivals and servers using it. The Kunpeng 920 shows the increasing sophistication of China’s largest system vendor and chip designer at a time when it’s at the center of heated trade tensions with the U.S.

    The Kunpeng 920 packs 64 custom Arm-v8 cores running at 2.6 GHz. It supports eight DDR4 channels running up to 2,933 MT/s, two 100G Ethernet ports and PCIe Gen 4.

    Huawei said the chip hits 930 on a SpecInt benchmark. It claimed that puts it 30% ahead in performance and 30% in power efficiency over Arm server rivals such as Marvell’s ThunderX2 and Ampere’s eMAG, recently adopted by Huawei’s server rival Lenovo.

    ThunderX2 and eMAG are 16nm CPUs with 32 cores running at similar speeds but using slower DDR4 and Gen 3 PCIe interfaces. The Kunpeng chip still lags Intel’s 14nm Xeon Gold which surpasses 1000 on SpecInt using only 18 cores.

    Huawei has long been rumored to be working on a high-end Arm-based server CPU. To date, Arm-based chips have had little traction in data centers beyond use in appliances and storage controllers, in part due to the dominance of Intel’s x86 in server software.

    For example, Microsoft’s Azure team said it was testing such chips more than a year ago, but it has yet to announce any production use of them. Amazon bought Arm chip designer Annapurna, but so far has used the chips mainly as storage controllers. Last year, Qualcomm folded its ARM server CPU group to cut a billion dollars from its expenses after China failed to approve its mega-merger with NXP.

    Intel is pairing its latest Xeon chips with its proprietary Optane DIMMs and adding more machine-learning capabilities to the CPUs. In November, AMD announced a 7nm x86 server processor as a follow on to its 14nm version, soaking up some of the demand for an alternative to Intel.

    Huawei said it will target the chips at native Arm applications and jobs such as big data and distributed storage that benefit from many cores. It announced three versions of servers that will use the chips as well as three cloud services it will offer, including a so-called Phone Cloud service.

    Next page: Kunpeng proprietary to Huawei’s growing servers

    [​IMG]
    The Kunpeng 920 hits 930 on the SpecInt benchmark.Click to enlarge. (Source: Huawei)
    The Kunpeng 920 adds to a large and growing x86 server business for Huawei. The company plans to continue its mainstream x86 line which it said has grown from sales of just 77,000 systems in 2012 to more than 918,000 last year.

    Huawei’s processor comes at a time when the telecom giant has surpassed Apple to become the world’s second largest smartphone maker. Its latest handset uses its own 7nm application processor released about the same time as a similar chip in the iPhone.

    [​IMG]
    TaiShan servers target applications that can make use of its 64 custom Arm v8 cores. Click to enlarge. (Source: Huawei)

    Despite its prowess in semiconductors, Huawei has no merchant market plans, said a company executive.

    “Since the early 1990s when we released our first chip, we have never thought about making HiSilicon a separate business…[and that remains] our long term strategy,” he said.

    The news comes as Huawei is at the center of a U.S./China trade war impacting the tech industry. The company’s CFO was recently detained in Canada at the request of the U.S. alleging a role in selling banned equipment to Iraq.

    In a similar dispute, the U.S. effectively shut down operations for several weeks last year at Huawei’s smaller cousin, ZTE, after banning sales of U.S. chips to the company.

    — Rick Merritt, Silicon Valley Bureau Chief, EE Times
     
    #180 Hendrik_2000, Jan 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019

Share This Page