Early China: History, Legends, and Myths

Discussion in 'Military History' started by solarz, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. solarz
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    solarz Colonel

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    Wonder if this is the tomb of the legendary Hou Yi?

    :eek::eek::eek:
     
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  2. solarz
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    solarz Colonel

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    I thought the main concern was the preservation of the artifacts? Apparently the Terra Cotta warriors were fully colored when they were first excavated, but the colors faded within hours after exposure to air, giving us the tan colored statues we know today. Archaeologists are worried that similar degradation may occur if they opened Qin Shihuang's tomb.
     
  3. taxiya
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    That was the two grounds I mentioned when Zhou Enlai rejected opening of Qin Shihuang's tomb.
    The other reasons I gave is of culture/moral grounds, I admit they can never be proven as the government will not say it laud. The only indirect proof theoretically would be that no bomb being opened today or in the future even though China already possessed sophisticated technology
    1. to build huge one piece structure without supporting pillars,
    2. being air tight, filled with inert gas (remove O2),
    3. researcher wearing spacesuit working inside etc.
     
    #63 taxiya, May 1, 2019
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  4. solarz
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    I don't think you need to cover the entire tomb, just need to build an airlock around the opening.
     
  5. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    Cavity type of tomb.
    That probably works with the later tombs which are built by bricks to a cavity/chamber big enough to place coffins, big enough like a house. Qing and Ming tombs are such kind. Which is also why they were opened by a door (stone slab) and never opened from the top.

    Cavity-less tomb.
    However, most earlier tombs are essentially done by digging a huge pit on the ground, placing coffins or very small wooden/stone chamber in it, then fill it by earth and sand, then build earth mount on top of it. Such as Qin and Han tombs. Digging a tunnel to the coffins/chambers would expose them to the element (surrounding earth, moisture and air). A airlock won't make any difference.

    Besides, "黄杨题凑" started from early Han dynasty and is the prime type of high value tombs of that time. This type fills the pit with sand rather than earth, the sand is mixed with big rocks, the coffin is put in the middle of the sand, finally the sandy pit is covered by earth mount. Digging a tunnel will not only expose the coffin to the element (sand passes air and moisture better than earth), but also instantly destroy the coffin by crashing it because sand flows, the digger (archaeologists) will be buried by the flowing sand too. That is the purpose of "黄杨题凑", anti-tomb raiders. Even if you manage not to be killed in digging, the buried objects will be severely damaged any way.
     
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  6. solarz
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    Fascinating! Thanks for sharing!
     
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  7. solarz
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    https://www.livescience.com/57437-oldest-evidence-of-silk-found-china.html

    I find it astounding that silk was used as far back as that! It suggests a level of animal husbandry (to raise the silk worms) and weaving (to turn the silk strands into fabric) that is amazing for a neolithic society.
     
  8. Dolcevita
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    Dolcevita Junior Member

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  9. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    For years the western historian and archaeologist dismissed the idea of China's 5000 years civilization . They say lack of written text or any tangible proof. Now the UNESCO just granted the World Heritage site to Liangzhu archaeologist site in Yuhang District of Hangzhou City, east China's Zhejiang Province, .Effectively now recognizing Chinese claim
    People said that yellow river basin is the cradle of Chinese civilization but I also believe southern China exactly Yangtze river delta is the other source of Chinese civilization

    14:43, 06-Jul-2019
    China's Liangzhu Archaeological Site now a UNESCO World Heritage Site
    Updated 18:31, 06-Jul-2019
    Hong Yaobin

    China's ancient Liangzhu Archaeological Site was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO's World Heritage Committee during its 43rd session in Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan, on Saturday.

    The site, located in Yuhang District of Hangzhou City, east China's Zhejiang Province, showcases the Chinese civilization of prehistoric rice agriculture that existed between 3300 B.C. and 2300 B.C.



    Spanning about 14.34 square kilometers (1,434 hectares) on the plain of river networks at the north foot of southeast China's coastal hilly region, the site includes the archaeological remains and unearthed cultural relics of the Liangzhu Ancient City and an environment of wetland.

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    An aerial view of parts of the Liangzhu Archaeological Site in Yuhang District of Hangzhou City, east China's Zhejiang Province, July 5, 2019. /VCG Photo

    The Archaeological Ruins of Liangzhu City provide profound and compelling evidence that Chinese civilization started 5,000 years ago, 1,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to Colin Renfrew, a retired professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of the British Academy.

    The World Heritage Committee added Liangzhu to the UNESCO list in order to encourage better protection and preservation of the site, which is considered to be of "outstanding universal value" to humanity.

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    A screenshot of the page that shows there are a total of 55 properties across China inscribed on the World Heritage List on unesco.org.

    With this new inscription, the World Heritage List now includes 55 properties – 37 cultural, 14 natural and four mixed items – across China, the highest in the world.

    Among them are the recently added natural site, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries along the Coast of the Yellow Sea-Bohai Gulf (Phase I), and the last World Cultural Heritage Site, Kulangsu – a historic international settlement inscribed two years ago that covers an island in Xiamen in southeast China's Fujian Province.

    Window to one of the world's oldest civilizations

    [​IMG]
    Parts of the historic remains are unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site in Yuhang District of Hangzhou City, east China's Zhejiang Province, July 5, 2019. /VCG Photo

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    The Liangzhu Archaeological Site exhibits the "supreme achievements" of agricultural civilization in the Yellow River and the Yangtze River basins – going back some 5,000 years. /VCG Photo

    CG Photo

    [​IMG]
    The Liangzhu Archaeological Site exhibits the "supreme achievements" of agricultural civilization in the Yellow River and the Yangtze River basins – going back some 5,000 years. /VCG Photo

    As an example of Liangzhu culture (3300 BC – 2300 BC), the Liangzhu Archaeological Site is hailed as one of the most important heritage sites of the Neolithic Age in China and is thought to have served as a political, economic, cultural and religious center of China's last Neolithic jade culture.

    It is surrounded by a buffer zone covering nearly 100 square kilometers (about 10,000 hectares) comprising of five heritage sites – Yaoshan, Tangshan, Xunshan, Huiguanshan and Yaojiadun.

    Tremendous historic remains, such as city walls, foundations of large architecture, tombs, altars, residences, docks and workshops have been found inside and outside of the Liangzhu Ancient City.
     
    #69 Hendrik_2000, Jul 7, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
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  10. Hendrik_2000
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    cont

    [​IMG]
    A jade bracelet unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site. /VCG Photo

    [​IMG]
    Part of a jade comb unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site. /VCG Photo

    [​IMG]
    A jade comb unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site. /VCG Photo

    [​IMG]
    Jade necklaces unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site. /VCG Photo

    [​IMG]
    A pottery jar unearthed at the Liangzhu Archaeological Site. /VCG Photo
     
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