Death toll in Xinjiang riot rises to 140

Discussion in 'Members' Club Room' started by maozedong, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. FriedRiceNSpice
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    FriedRiceNSpice Senior Member

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    Then you will agree that once there is a significant Han majority in the Sinkiang region, the area will legitimately Chinese? Because that is exactly what is happening right now.
     
  2. Scratch
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    Scratch Captain

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    I've probably been somewhat unclear. This is actually part of what I'm criticizing. "Oversettleing" someone else who is already there and then say we have now the right to claim the land because there's more of "our" people now is, in my view, not really legitimate either. Especially when the "original" settlers weren't in a sovereign positoin to protect themselves from this in the first place.
    I know that I'm putting myself in a position difficult to sustain, because I guess my "search" for the original settlers is probably doomed in the first place anyway. As the very first owners of the land can't be determined anymore by any means.
     
  3. FriedRiceNSpice
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    FriedRiceNSpice Senior Member

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    Well, that just happens to be the case and there is evidence/support for both sides regarding who were the original settlers and thus legitimate owners of the land. Throughout history both groups had settled and moved away from the region. The fact is, the region is headed towards becoming predominantly Han, and the trend is unlikely to reverse. Just look at the Native Americans. Most Americans agree that land was forcibly and wrongfully taken from the Natives, but does that mean that the land will be given back to Native control?
     
  4. A.Man
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    A.Man Major

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    Xinjiang was not the so-called "The Promised Land." If someone wants to fight the "God," please go back to the Middle East. Dragon did not know who the Allah was.
     
    #204 A.Man, Aug 7, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2009
  5. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Unrest sparks up in Xingiang!

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  6. Obcession
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    Obcession Junior Member

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    I've been following this event closely in the last day. Some of the westerner's comments on this was unbelievably ignorant and arrogant to say the least. Specifically, the comments posted on National Post of Canada, where anyone saying the Han Chinese are victims too are being accused of having been brainwashed by propaganda. The logic of this escapes me...

    When the police and PAP have too much presence in Xinjiang, the Uighurs complain. When they have too little presence, the Hans complain. Interesting development.
     
  7. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    I'm surprised there's not more discussion in this thread where as there have been five deaths in re-newed violence in Xinjiang.

    There are dozens of photos of troops in Xinjiang posted in the last two days.

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  8. KYli
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    KYli Junior Member

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/06/world/asia/06china.html?hpChina Ousts Regional Leader in Wake of Unrest
    Article Tools Sponsored By
    By KEITH BRADSHER and XIYUN YANG
    Published: September 5, 2009

    HONG KONG — The top Communist official in Urumqi in western China was dismissed on Saturday as a large deployment of military police appeared to have brought a measure of peace to the city after two days of large street protests.

    Li Zhi, the party secretary of Urumqi, lost his post, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Saturday evening. He became the most senior person removed since ethnic tensions erupted there in severe rioting in early July.

    Beijing officials have also sent this week a special medical inspection unit from the People’s Liberation Army to Urumqi to investigate a series of incidents in which people have allegedly been stabbed with needles.

    It is somewhat unusual for China’s leaders to replace a senior local official so quickly after protests — in this case, while large deployments of armed police are still blocking intersections in Urumqi and most shops are still closed. The Beijing leadership has often sought to avoid giving the impression of giving in to public pressure.

    The removal of Mr. Li, “shows that Xinjiang is viewed as a strategic region where there cannot be the kind of social protests we have seen in recent days,” said Nicholas Bequelin, a senior researcher with Human Rights Watch.

    The latest protests were notable for including large crowds of people who specifically called on Friday for the removal of Mr. Li’s boss, Wang Lequan, the powerful party secretary of restive Xinjiang region, of which Urumqi is the capital. Mr. Wang, a member of the Politburo believed to be a close ally of President Hu Jintao, has run the nominally autonomous region for 15 years and is famous within China for taking a hard line toward ethnic minorities.

    But the crowds in Urumqi this week have been accusing Mr. Wang and his aides of not being tough enough. The violence this week involves renewed tensions between Uighurs, the dominant ethnic group in Urumqi, and Han Chinese, who make up by far the dominant ethnic group for China overall.

    Han have been moving in large numbers to Xinjiang since the 1960s, occupying many of the best jobs; according to the authorities, most of the victims in the rioting in early July, in which at least 197 people died, were Han.

    Tens of thousands of Han protesters took to the streets on Thursday as word spread that young Uighurs (pronounced WEE-gers) had allegedly been stabbing people with needles. Zhang Hong, the deputy mayor of Urumqi, announced late Friday that the unrest on Thursday had resulted in five deaths with 14 other people injured, according to Xinhua.

    Mr. Zhang also said that through Thursday, 531 people had gone to hospitals claiming to have been stabbed with needles, and 106 of them had physical wounds consistent with having suffered such a stabbing. Some Han have voiced the worry that the needles could carry H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS.

    Before his fall from power, Mr. Li had been the most visible Chinese official seeking to respond to the unrest in his city this week. He had raced to a succession of gathering places and tried to persuade residents to return home without further violence.

    Zhu Hailun, the secretary of the Chinese Communist Party’s Xinjiang legislative and political affairs committee, will replace Mr. Li.

    A troubled quiet returned on Saturday to the streets of Urumqi, residents said in telephone interviews. “The military police are everywhere and they have a very firm hold on the city,” said a taxi driver who gave his family name, Li.

    Most of the downtown area, the scene of some of the largest protests, was blocked off to traffic. “The military police are everywhere, and they have a very firm hold on the city,” Mr. Li said.

    A downtown resident who gave her family name, Liu, said that the heart of the city was unusually quiet. “There’s no one out there, every store is still closed,” she said.
     
  9. pla101prc
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    pla101prc Senior Member

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    i was quite puzzled by the removal of the key officials in Xinjiang as well becauseit will give others the impression that the government of Urumuqi (and subsequently the government of China) "screwed up" during the Xinjiang unrest. maybe it has something to with politics in Beijing
     
    #209 pla101prc, Sep 6, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2009
  10. Schumacher
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    Schumacher Senior Member

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    Nothing to be puzzled about. Removal of officials for incompetence, corruption etc has actually happened regularly in China in recent years.
     
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