Chinese tradition, ceremony,culture

Discussion in 'Members' Club Room' started by Hendrik_2000, Aug 9, 2016.

  1. Hendrik_2000
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    For any one interested here the link of the ceremony. Traditionally it take 12 days but who in the world has that much time in modern world So the ceremony is now limited to the most important segment like Lap Chai(exchanging of the gift), Arrival of the groom and unveiling where you will for first time see your bride(Chim Pang). And of course the tea ceremony.Here is complete list with alot of photo

    http://www.chasingfooddreams.com/2013/07/a-southern-peranakan-wedding-affair.html
    http://www.chasingfooddreams.com/2013/07/a-southern-peranakan-wedding-affair_23.html

    A Southern Peranakan Wedding Affair… Timeless Heritage and Cuisine! (Part 1)

    [​IMG]

    Passing on a Timeless Heritage and its Cuisine with Peranakan Culture Consultant Cedric Tan and Peranakan Chef Debbie Teoh !

    As time goes by and the world continues to modernize, we are definitely pleased with the continuous evolving of our futures. With every moment in life as it changes, there seems to be a part that we all tend to take for granted and that is our heritage. Our legacy, our pride, our hope… these are priceless virtue that can never be forgotten as it will lead us to be who we are one day. Yes, traditions are hard to keep and yes, there are just so many dos and don’ts in many cultures but that is what it is all about, isn’t it? That is what makes our heritage unique and shape us to who were are today.

    No, this is not a lecture to all but it leads me to share with everyone a timeless experience I had recently. Truth be told, I was ignorant of my own heritage till I reach my early twenties. Then I became really curious and found out that my dad is a baba while mom is not. I proceeded to literally interrogate my mom about our heritage and soon, I was hooked. Proud to be part of the Nyonya and Baba heritage from the northern part of the country, I make sure to learn up all the aspects of the cuisine and also some of its dos and don’ts. After all, it is where I came from and my parents came from and also, it builds me to who I am today.
     
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    For any one interested here the link of the ceremony. Traditionally it take 12 days but who in the world has that much time in modern world So the ceremony is now limited to the most important segment like Lap Chai(exchanging of the gift), Arrival of the groom and unveiling where you will for first time see your bride(Chim Pang). And of course the tea ceremony.Here is complete list with alot of photo

    http://www.chasingfooddreams.com/2013/07/a-southern-peranakan-wedding-affair.html
    http://www.chasingfooddreams.com/2013/07/a-southern-peranakan-wedding-affair_23.html

    A Southern Peranakan Wedding Affair… Timeless Heritage and Cuisine! (Part 1)

    [​IMG]

    Passing on a Timeless Heritage and its Cuisine with Peranakan Culture Consultant Cedric Tan and Peranakan Chef Debbie Teoh !

    As time goes by and the world continues to modernize, we are definitely pleased with the continuous evolving of our futures. With every moment in life as it changes, there seems to be a part that we all tend to take for granted and that is our heritage. Our legacy, our pride, our hope… these are priceless virtue that can never be forgotten as it will lead us to be who we are one day. Yes, traditions are hard to keep and yes, there are just so many dos and don’ts in many cultures but that is what it is all about, isn’t it? That is what makes our heritage unique and shape us to who were are today.

    No, this is not a lecture to all but it leads me to share with everyone a timeless experience I had recently. Truth be told, I was ignorant of my own heritage till I reach my early twenties. Then I became really curious and found out that my dad is a baba while mom is not. I proceeded to literally interrogate my mom about our heritage and soon, I was hooked. Proud to be part of the Nyonya and Baba heritage from the northern part of the country, I make sure to learn up all the aspects of the cuisine and also some of its dos and don’ts. After all, it is where I came from and my parents came from and also, it builds me to who I am today.
     
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    I am glad they show "Crazy rich asian movies" for all the world to see Introducing little known overseas Chinese family with their foibles and glory. It generate such catharsis for all the Asian American in US and Canada, Australia finally to see themselves as real people and not geek or kungfu fighter or hyper sex love interest of white man. It will empowered a new generation who can be proud of where that come from to see in this movies themselves
    It create buzz in all media like twitter like this
    https://twitter.com/crazyrichmovie?lang=en

    But behind all the hoopla is quiet Kevin Kwan the author of the story and executive producer for the film. Acutally he based the story loosely on his own family. He decide to write the story as memory to his passing father who passed away in 2010. He take of him and they often reminisce about how life was when they still live in Singapore in 70's and 80's. Coming from one of the illustrious family in Singapore he has a quiet dignity and self respect .One of the film producer that he approach want to change the lead female role to white actress and he rejected it He said you don't get it . His grand mother always tell him to respect himself and never forget where you come from Which quite different from "some of the Chinese in NA" that I encountered Here is his story very interesting and it give me goose bump because it is so similar to my experience
    https://sg.asiatatler.com/society/a...-behind-kevin-kwans-crazy-rich-asians-trilogy
    Crazy Rich Asians: The True Story That Inspired The Best-Selling Trilogy
    CLOSE UP
    AUGUST 15, 2018 | BY MJ JOSE

    Art imitates life, and this is especially true for Kevin Kwan's Crazy Rich Asians novels and now, hit film. The Singaporean author shares tales and personal pictures of his idyllic childhood and how it inspired the characters he created

    In the essay she penned for Time Magazine’s Most Influential People of 2018, the actor Constance Wu (who portrays protagonist Rachel Chu in the film adaptation of Crazy Rich Asians) says of Kevin Kwan:

    “[He] doesn’t focus on making Asians cool; he focuses on making our stories whole. The bits we’re proud of, the bits we try to hide, the tremendous heart that beats underneath it all.”


    And she is right, for the Crazy Rich Asians saga is set in a milieu that was never explored in fiction until the first book was published in 2013. The author himself affirms this; he feels people were initially drawn in by the sheer novelty and aspirational qualities of the world within his pages.

    “No one else was writing social satires about the upper class of contemporary Asia,” he adds. “But then the characters, their emotions, and their stories ended up being so relatable, and that is what kept readers hooked. I am often approached by people saying, ‘My family isn’t Asian or rich, but we are just like the family in your books. We are just as crazy!’”

    (Related: How Accurate Was Crazy Rich Asians? Insider Woffles Wu Tells All)

    [​IMG]
    Newton Estate, which belonged to Kevin Kwan’s great grandfather
    [​IMG]
    Kevin Kwan
    Tales from the old country
    Kevin’s own upbringing—“normal” and “idyllic” are his choice words to describe it—could not be more different. Though his writing drew inspiration from his own life, it was not in the way people might expect. “I was not brought up in a lavish manner—quite the opposite, actually—as my paternal grandparents, whom I lived with, were not ostentatious people,” he shares. “But there was a quiet elegance in the way they carried on with their lives, as well as a beauty to the customs and rituals we practised that inspired me as I began to conceptualise the idea of Tyersall Park.”

    In the seventies and early eighties, life in Singapore was very different from how it is today. The shadow of its colonial past was still deeply felt by its residents; hence the vibe was more relaxed, and there was little to no pressure on the young when it came to their studies.

    (Related: Who Was On The Jade Carpet At The 'Crazy Rich Asians' Singapore Premiere?)

    The Kwan family’s roots are significantly entrenched in that of Singapore’s: Kevin’s great-grandfather, Oh Sian Guan, was one of the founding directors of Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation (OCBC), the country’s oldest bank. Reverend Paul Hang, his maternal grandfather, founded the Hinghwa Methodist Church. His paternal grandfather, Dr Arthur PC Kwan, was the first western-trained ophthalmologist as well as the Commissioner of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Well-known for treating the poor free of charge at his clinic, he was awarded a knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II for his humanitarian services.

    “He was a humble, compassionate soul, and the epitome of a dream grandfather,” Kevin fondly recalls. “I remember how he would sneak me and my brothers to the hotel at the bottom of the hill from our house for ice cream, and we weren’t to tell a soul. He had gone to the University of Edinburgh, and was quite the anglophile—he had the most impeccably tailored suits and enjoyed smoking the pipe every evening after dinner.”

    His grandmother, Egan Oh, was an elegant and imperious lady who was more traditional in her ways. Though she was the disciplinarian of the household, she also had her gentle side, which often showed whenever she would recount fascinating stories from her youth.

    “She was the most sought-after debutante of her day, admired for her beauty and distinctive style,” says Kevin. “Each time she left her house in Newton, there would be a cluster of male admirers waiting by the gates, who would run after her car, trying to throw roses and love letters through the window.”

    It was she who would instill in her grandson a sense of self-respect and pride in his Chinese roots. Because Kevin lived with them from the day he was born to the day he moved to the United States, he remained very close to his grandparents.

    (Related: The 'Crazy Rich Asians' Teaser Trailer Is Finally Out)

    [​IMG]
    A scene straight out of a day in the life of Asia’s upper class

    Like the Young, T’sien, and Shang families in the books, the Kwans had their own customs. Kevin distinctly recalls how each year, their household would be buzzing with activity when it was time to make zhong—sticky rice dumplings stuffed with various fillings wrapped in bamboo leaves—for Dragon Boat Festival season.

    The gardeners would hack down leaves from the bamboo hedges and soak them in water. The cooks would then prepare huge vats of glutinous rice and different fillings—some sweet, some savoury—and the marathon dumpling wrapping sessions would begin. By the end of the week, the Kwans would be distributing the treats to relatives and friends.


    “It was a very Huck Finn kind of life,” says the author of his childhood. When not in school (he went to the Anglo-Chinese School [ACS] on Barker Road), he could be found whiling his time away outdoors, biking around the neighbourhood with his gang of friends.

    At that age, he did not have a concrete idea of what luxury was. “I grew up in an old house filled with old furniture, and I was afraid of going downstairs after dark because everything seemed creepy,” he adds.

    “Of course, being a young kid back then, I had no appreciation for my grandparents’ custom-made Huan Pao Fang pieces. I was envious of my friends who lived in high-rise apartments, not because they were wealthy but because I found them cool—they had lifts, wall-to-wall carpeting, and garages filled with vintage Rolls Royces and exotic sports cars. One estate even had an airplane hangar in the garden!”

    (Related: Behind 'Crazy Rich Asians': 15 Minutes With Kevin Kwan)
     
    #183 Hendrik_2000, Sep 1, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2018
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    (cont)
    He only began to recognise his own privilege after they left for the United States, where his world became one of suburban neighbourhoods, smaller homes, no household help, and certainly no airplanes in the backyards.

    “I was not brought up in a lavish manner—quite the opposite, actually—as my paternal grandparents, whom I lived with were not ostentatious people”

    An outsider looking in
    Though only a few of his relatives work in creative industries, there has always been an artistic streak that runs through the Kwan family’s blood. Kevin’s father studied architecture (but ultimately chose to become an engineer) while his mother is an accomplished pianist. His aunt, a fellow writer, wrote for Singapore Tatler in the 1980s. Had he stayed in Singapore, he doubts that he would have had the opportunity to exercise his creativity—perhaps he would have been fated to crunch numbers in a finance post.

    (Related: Who Wore What At The Crazy Rich Asians Hollywood Premiere)
    The author’s great aunt, Margaret Hu, wife of Hu Tsai Kuen and mother of former Minister of Finance Richard Hu, at her estate in Paterson Hill
    Writing a novel had always been on Kevin’s bucket list, originally filed under ‘save-it-for-later’ but quickly migrated to ‘do-it-now’ after his father was diagnosed with cancer in 2009. Kevin would drive him to medical appointments, and their daily conversations would often turn to stories of the not-so-distant past, of a place that was once home, of a colourful cast of characters he wished to memorialise on the printed page.

    “So many of my childhood memories permeate the books—from the aunties’ Bible study luncheons, to Mrs Singh’s armed guard-strewn jewellery parties, to the mansion that boasted a pond filled with baby sharks,” he shares. “From the very beginning, writing a novel was something I wanted to do for myself as a means of preserving the memories that had been percolating in my head for so many years. It was also my goal to show the rest of the world an aspect of Asia that isn’t limited to what we read about in gossip magazines—that isn’t just about people dropping millions on weddings or Hermès bags. I wanted to depict the society that I knew well: one of educated families with style and taste that have been quietly going about their lives for generations.”

    (Related: 10 True Stories From Real-Life Crazy Rich Asians)
    [​IMG]
    The author’s late father, Samuel Kwan
    [​IMG]

    A portrait of Egan Oh
    “I am often approached by people saying, ‘My family isn’t Asian or rich, but we are just like the family in your books. We are just as crazy!’”

    Moving to the United States had a profound effect on how Kevin saw and understood the world he had been privy to. Characters such as Nicholas Young, who had been sent off to boarding school in the United Kingdom (this was a common practice, even in the real world), have an inevitably westernised worldview despite being Asian, something that the author himself can relate to. “My own perspective is that of an outsider looking in,” he affirms.

    Reactions to Crazy Rich Asians have run the gamut. A number of his cousins love the books and have been supportive of Kevin since day one. Some aunts and uncles don’t quite understand what the fuss is all about. His number one fan is his mum, who does a wondrous job of convincing even total strangers to get copies of their own (“She really should be put on my publisher’s payroll,” he quips fondly).

    Among readers, it has reached cult favourite status. He has heard anecdotes of people using the books as shopping or eating guides, or as reference points to some capacity when designing homes or planning weddings.

    “A chef at a famous Michelin-starred restaurant in a rather remote location told me that so many people have come in, saying they found out about the place through my books,” he shares. “My friend, Antonio Ruocco—the sandal-maker who runs the legendary Da Costanzo on Capri said that many women come into his boutique to commission the same sandals that Astrid wore.”

    (Related: If You Liked Crazy Rich Asians, You'll Love These Books)


    CHANGING THE WORLD
    “I was in absolute shock,” he says of the honour he has been accorded by Time Magazine, which he had learnt of via email just a few days before the announcement was made public. “I was sure they had made a mistake. Or perhaps someone was playing a prank on me. But a couple of days later, it was on newsstands, with a beautiful essay by Constance Wu—who had managed not to give away anything despite our correspondence just a few days before.”

    Kevin is humbled by the experience, happy to be sharing the honour with many of his own longtime heroes, as well as grateful for the incredible levels of support he has received from readers all over the world.

    [​IMG]
    Egan Oh (left, in white tuxedo) with a relative at the Newton Estate
    “I wanted to depict the society that I knew well: one of educated families with style and taste that have been quietly going about their lives for generations”

    [​IMG]
    Egan Oh (far right) with her older brother Oh Hoon Kuay (far left) and friends
    [​IMG]
    The author’s mother, Elizabeth Kwan
    And there is even more reason to celebrate, for his work has made a successful transition from the printed page to the silver screen. Involved in all creative aspects of the film, he worked closely with director Jon Chu as well as the rest of the cast and crew, scouting for the perfect locations, choosing the appropriate costumes, and even helping train the actors to speak with the right accents. He personally reached out to people he knew to borrow one-of-a-kind jewellery and timepieces—a distinguished collector permitted them the use of an incredibly rare Rolex Paul Newman Panda Daytona worth over half a million dollars—to establish a truly authentic feel.

    (Related: 8 Romantic Restaurants For A 'Crazy Rich Asians' Date Night)

    “This film—which is the first Hollywood studio romantic comedy to feature an Asian couple—is important in that it’s part of a larger movement to create greater representation in mainstream entertainment,” he adds. “There are now over 20 million Asians in the United States, and the population has grown 72 per cent since the year 2000. When I speak to book clubs abroad and share the story of how a producer who was initially interested in the film rights suggested that Rachel be cast as a Caucasian girl, women get outraged at the thought of Hollywood patronising them, thinking they only want to see films starring white people. The tide has really turned, and people everywhere are craving for new faces and new stories.”

    Family photos copyright (c) Kevin Kwan Collection

    CLOSE UP
     
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    Here is the story of Chinese obsession with having a son to continue the bloodline meaning carry the family name .Girl get married off So the offspring will have the husband family name
    Now this family try an try because the matriarch insist on having grand child . but no luck instead they end up with 9 girls But they still love them all irrespective of gender and don't want to give it away

    Interesting story from Channel 8 Spore. As well it tell the story of clan association. You see in Southern China most of the villages are single family villages meaning all the people in the villages are related So when they immigrate they carried on with this tradition by forming clan association where they live . It is mutual supporting group in foreign land for people from the same village
     
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    In the heydays there are more than 100 street opera troupe in Singapore It is still popular until mid to late 80 But now the number is dwindle down to just 10. It fail to attract young people because of competition with electronic gadget, TV and indoor air condition and the demise of Hokkien as mean of communication It is sad because this opera is the mean to transmit Chinese culture It deal with human suffering , frailty and blessing. But recently this young guy try to revive the art and seem to be doing well. His specialty is Teochew opera. Teochew is a name of dialect related to Hokkien They live in northen Quangdong province around Meixian. Famous Teochew is Li Ka Sheng and Taksin prime minister of of Thailand
    It is beautiful art with gorgeous costume and good music and singing like in this video start at minute 19:53


    Putting the 'tok tok chiang' back in local Chinese opera
    By CHEN LIN
    [​IMG]
    Chng Shao Kai/TODAY
    Nick Shen showcasing his collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre.
    Published12 AUGUST, 2018
    UPDATED 13 AUGUST, 2018
    SINGAPORE — The name Nick Shen probably reminds most people of the former Channel 8 actor. But the 40-year-old is more at home these days belting out Teochew Chinese opera than acting in television drama series.

    Since 2011, the former Mediacorp actor, who catapulted to fame after winning the 1999 Star Search competition organised to scout for Chinese language-speaking acting talent, has been dedicating his effort to reviving and preserving the dying art of Chinese opera. Through it, he hopes to reconnect Singaporean youths with their cultural roots and instil moral values.

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen showcasing his collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    Through collaborating with schools, and adding bilingual storylines and magic tricks to the performances, he widened the reach of the ancient art form by involving youths.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    Without revealing figures, the 40-year-old told TODAY that his acting event management company Tok Tok Chiang — which he founded after leaving Mediacorp — now receives a "healthy" income, enough to support the more than 30 performers and musicians under his employ.

    This is despite monthly operational costs of at least S$10,000, which includes the rental of two store rooms — one the size of a five-room Housing and Development Board (HDB) flat and another just slightly bigger than a HDB rental flat — to store all their costumes, props and equipment. The costs will double when they have more performances.

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen wearing a Chinese opera warrior costume. Photo: Courtesy of Nick Shen

    In 2015, Mr Shen was invited to Germany to perform Chinese opera, after he clinched the 10 Outstanding Young Persons of the World Award organised by Junior Chamber International for his outstanding achievement in the culture scene.

    In recent years, he has also received commissions to perform at company events as well as schools, museums and government events.

    "We have had westerners and government agencies who employed our services … I realised that Chinese opera has a huge market in Singapore, especially during Chinese New Year and other traditional Chinese festivals," Mr Shen said.

    On quieter months, they get bookings for two to four shows, going up to a peak of more than 20 shows during the busiest months when traditional Chinese festivals such as Hungry Ghost Festival are on.

    This, however, has not always been the case.

    ROUGH START

    When he quit his full-time job to focus solely on Chinese opera, some friends persuaded him to "think twice". Some said Chinese opera would not go far in Singapore market, while others commented the name he chose — Tok Tok Chiang — sounded like a name for Chinese funeral company.


    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen looking at a series of traditional opera photos at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    In his first year of operations, public interest in the art form was tepid. Other than the usual clientele of museums or clan associations, asking for performances to mark certain traditional Chinese festivals or deities special days, there was no demand for his services.

    Not only did Mr Shen have to dip into his own savings to keep the company running, but he also chalked up other costs such as more than S$100,000 pumped in over the years to buy opera-related costumes and props, as well as another S$30,000 in business management course fees to help him get ready to run his own company.

    [​IMG]
    A collection of traditional Chinese props and antiques exhibited by Nick Shen at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY
     
    #186 Hendrik_2000, Sep 14, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
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    (cont)

    TODAY

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen's collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    In spite of the challenges, he pressed on. From collaborating with other opera troupes and freelancers, his company now has two troupes under its wings.

    In May last year, he took over one of Singapore's oldest Chinese opera troupe, the 154-year-old Lao Sai Tao Yuan Teochew Opera Troupe. This was the troupe which his grandfather, who used to play the drums, used to perform with.

    The owner, seeing his interest in the art form, approached him to take over the troupe. Another owner of a traditional puppet troupe called Lao Sai Bao Feng Teochew Puppet Troupe also bequeathed him their troupe which is more than 70 years old.

    With no experience handling a street opera troupe, which had more than 30 members, some of whom had been performing with it for decades, he said: "No one believed that I could make it. Many of them already made the firm decision to quit, but I pleaded with everyone to stay, and tried to accommodate to everyone's needs. Perhaps it was because of the resilience that was built by my dad, I sustained."

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen showcasing his collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen performing Chinese opera in a local seafood restaurant for Mid-Autumn Festival. Photo: Courtesy of Nick Shen

    ONCE A 'SHAME' TO THE FAMILY

    Mr Shen's love for Teochew opera stemmed from his childhood days. His grandfather was a drum player for Lao Sai Tao Yuan, and his grandmother used to take him to watch the opera performances in their Tanglin Halt neighbourhood, and taught him moral values.

    He loved it so much that he wanted to become an opera performer. His father was dead against it.

    "My father was worried that I won't have a future if I become a opera artist, and it is like a 'shame' to the family," he said. "The more he disagreed, the more I persevered. He built the resilience in me."

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen showcasing his collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    The young Nick used poster colour to paint his face and draped a towel over his arm, pretending it was the elongated sleeves of the opera costume.

    When he turned 13, he ran away from home for a month to "intern" at a opera troupe during the school holidays. There, he learnt it takes one hour for an opera performer to put on his make-up, and four people are needed to help a performer put on his costume.

    Then there was the challenge of having to memorise and recite the lines in Teochew dialect which use phrases not commonly heard in daily conversations.
     
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    (cont)
    conversations.

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen showcasing his collection of traditional Chinese props at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    "It was a dream come true, I finally had a chance to perform with my idols," he recounted.

    Despite being paid only S$3 for the whole day's work, and having to don the bulky opera costume in Singapore's hot and humid weather, he had no regrets. In fact, that stint made him love opera even more.

    "(It was) best period of my entire life, given a chance I'll still run away from home," Mr Shen said with a laugh.

    RETURNING TO HIS FIRST LOVE

    But he needed to show his father that he could stand on his own feet. So when the Star Search opportunity came along, he leapt at it.

    "There are similarities between being a Chinese opera actor and TV actor. Both require acting skills, and I wanted to gain exposure to different mediums. It was also a very rare chance, especially after I won Star Search. Plus, I had to fulfil the two-year contract too."

    TV acting kept him busy until many years later, after talking to his entrepreneur friends and mentors, he plucked up the courage to pursue his first love — Chinese opera — again.

    Today, his father has changed his mind about his son's involvement in the art form. The older Mr Shen would even help him put on his costumes and even cheer him up when he meets with setback in his new career, Mr Shen said.

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen at the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre. Photo: Chng Shao Kai/TODAY

    [​IMG]
    Nick Shen being interviewed by Channel 8 upon winning the 10 Outstanding Young Persons of the World Award for his cultural achievement in 2014. Photo: Courtesy of Nick Shen

    And getting to perform in Germany after winning the 2015 award was great encouragement to him. He said: "(Opera) was something that my dad looked down on, something that my classmate used to laugh at me for. I never thought that one day I could represent Singapore on the world stage to share my passion for Chinese opera."

    His plans for the coming years are to make a film about Chinese opera and to take his troupe members to perform on international stages.

    He said: "I hope to take them all around the world to perform … all these old performers who dedicated their youth to street opera performance, if they have a chance to represent Singapore and go overseas to perform, they will feel very proud and happy, this may be one of their biggest achievements in life as a local artist."
     
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    I think this is about time that they strengthen the Chinese culture because of increasing penetration of western Culture . If left unattended there will be no more Chinese culture we all become bananas. It is good that the government built this cultural center. I notice the picture is Peranakan dance even though a bit different but we wouldn't exist if not for larger Chinese community
    Interesting Wang Gungwu mention that Singapore Chinese culture is amalgamation of all the Chinese culture in SEA. He is noted Overseas Chinese expert. Born in China but migrated to Indonesian as a child , grew up in Malaysia. Study in Australia. Now distinguished professor and director of SEA institute in NUS

    Officiated by our Patron, PM Lee Hsien Loong on 19 May 2017, SCCC strives to become a hub for high quality performances, exhibitions and cultural activities, and a lively and interactive platform for all ethnic communities to gather and interact with one another. New immigrants can also acquaint themselves with our local Chinese traditions and customs. 新加坡华族文化中心于2017年5月19日由赞助人李显龙总理主持开幕。中心致力成为一个呈现优质演出、展览和文娱活动的交流站,为不同族群的国人创造一个充满活力的互动平台。此外,新移民也能通过参与中心的活动,了解本地习俗和文化



    Opening speech LXL
     
    #189 Hendrik_2000, Sep 14, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
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    Sorry Wang Gungwu was born in Surabaya Indonesia

    Wang Gungwu
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    Wang Gungwu
    AO, CBE

    [​IMG]
    Wang Gungwu speaking at an event in 2010
    Born 9 October 1930 (age 87)
    Surabaya, Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia)
    Alma mater University of Malaya
    School of Oriental and African Studies
    Known for Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong, University Professor of the National University of Singapore, Doyen of Overseas Chinese historical scholarship
    Scientific career
    Institutions
    University of Malaya
    Australian National University
    University of Hong Kong
    National University of Singapore
    Doctoral advisor Denis C. Twitchett
    Doctoral students Huang Jianli, Ng Chin-Keong
    This is a Chinese name; the family name is Wang.
    Wang Gungwu, AO, CBE (王赓武; 王賡武; Wáng Gēngwǔ; born 9 October 1930)[1]is an Australian historian of overseas Chinese descent.[2] He has studied and written about the Chinese diaspora, but he has objected to the use of the word diaspora to describe the migration of Chinese from China because both it mistakenly implies that all overseas Chinese are the same and has been used to perpetuate fears of a "Chinese threat", under the control of the Chinese government.[3] An expert on the Chinese tianxia ("all under heaven") concept, he was the first to suggest its application to the contemporary world as an American Tianxia.[4]

    Background[edit]
    Wang was born in Surabaya, Indonesia to emigrant Chinese parents and grew up in Ipoh, Malaysia. He completed his secondary education in Anderson School, an English medium school in Ipoh. Wang studied history in the University of Malaya, where he received his bachelor's and master's degrees. He was a founding member of the University Socialist Club and its founding president in 1953.[5]

    He holds a PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London (1957) for his thesis The structure of power in North China during the Five Dynasties. He taught at the University of Malaya (in both Singapore and Kuala Lumpur). He was one of the founders of the Malaysian political party Gerakan, but he was not personally involved in the party's activities.[6] In 1968 he went to Canberra to become Professor of Far Eastern History in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies (RSPAS) at the Australian National University. He subsequently became Director of RSPAS. He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong from 1988 to 1995. In 2007, Wang became the third person to be named University Professor by the National University of Singapore.[
     
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