Chinese shipbuilding industry

Discussion in 'Navy' started by tphuang, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. weig2000
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    weig2000 Junior Member

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    Good summary and overview. It feels like CAC vs SAC in the military aircraft industry, although both CSSC's and CSIC's main business are civilian shipbuilding.

    Well, winner and loser have really been decided by the market, as you have summarized very well above. The state pulls the trigger.
     
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  2. H2O
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    H2O Junior Member
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    Hour long walk-through of the Xuelong 2 prior to delivery (if I understood the interpreter correctly).

     
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  3. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    I should add that Liaoning --- the province, not the ship --- got singled out for being heavy on money losing SOEs and the Dalian shipyards belong here. The province has an economic growth of 6.1% which is below the national average. Liaoning is part of China's rust belt, which also includes Heliojiang. Come to think of it Shenyang where SAC is located, is the capital of Liaoning, and so the comparison of CSSC vs. CSIC is similar to CAC vs. SAC. The prosperous China south vs. the rust belt China north. Another problem with China's rust belt is that the young and talented in these areas are moving south, which worsens the problem for the industries in these province, and no doubt this can have implications with the SOEs and military industrial complexes there.
     
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  4. asif iqbal
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    asif iqbal Brigadier

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    But traditionally china’s north had the heavy industries

    Because it was transferred from Soviet Union?
     
  5. FriedRiceNSpice
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    FriedRiceNSpice Senior Member

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    Actually dates back to early Republican times/Warlord era. Reasons include easy access to coal via large deposits in the area, abundance in natural resources, terrain, and Russian/Japanese railroads and infrastructure. Later Japanese continued to build up industry after they occupied the region, and it was a critical component of Japanese wartime industrial economy. Soviets actually swept in and plundered many of the industrial assets of the area in the last month's of WW2. Although later on, the Soviets did send technical advisors to help in modernizing China's industrial base, at least up until the Sino Soviet split. But the Soviets never "transferred," industry to Manchuria.
     
  6. asif iqbal
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    asif iqbal Brigadier

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    Well you know what I meant

    But thanks for confirming
     
  7. AndrewS
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    AndrewS Senior Member
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    If anything, it was the Japanese that transferred industry to Manchuria.

    During WW2, Manchuria produced more steel than the Japanese Home Islands.
    And the Mitsubishi Zaibatsu actually relocated their headquarters from Japan to Manchuria
     
  8. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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  9. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    Sometimes we are too myopically focused on naval warships to see that Chinese shipbuilding, with its production of commercial vessels and such, is such an awe inspiring and majestic enterprise.



     
  10. Tam
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    Tam Senior Member
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    This titanic ship, seen in recent pictures of the Jiangnan Shipyard, is highly likely to be the newest member of COSCO Shipping's Universe class. Not the largest container ship but among the largest, and is the largest made in China container ship class, checking in at over 21,000+ TEU and 400 meters long. This ship should be one of a fleet recently contracted by COSCO to Jiangnan Shipyard. Look at how the 052DG is dwarfed behind it.

    https://www.marineinsight.com/shipp...chinas-largest-container-ship-with-21237-teu/


    Screenshot 2019-08-03 at 2.34.58 PM - Edited.png cosco-shipping-universe_9795610_2346909_Medium.jpg
     
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