China's strategy in Korean peninsula

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by Phead128, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. Phead128
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    Phead128 Junior Member

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    North Korea can request troops from China to suppress an uprising, rebellion, or military coup.

    Did King Gojong of Joseon just sit on his thumbs while Donghwak rebellion was occuring? No, he asked the Guangzu Emperor for 3,000 Chinese troops to land in Incheon to suppress the Donghwak peasant rebellion on the Korean gov't behalf.

    You can't expect North Korea to not ask for foreign aid when predatory vultures (SK/US) are circling ahead awaiting it's imminent doom/collapse.
     
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  2. Phead128
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    Phead128 Junior Member

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    Only South Korea would care. Vast majority of other countries will welcome China installing a pro-Beijing puppet state, since it will lead to the eradication of NK's bellicose and erratic behavior, controlling it's nuclear stockpile, and of course, reforms. Win-win-win for everyone involved.

    Nobody would care except South Korea - even Japan and United States would welcome more Chinese influence in North Korea by way of pro-Beijing puppet state, since it would lead to a more predictable neighbor and economic reforms.

    Hint: political expediency > korean unification
     
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  3. SamuraiBlue
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    SamuraiBlue Captain

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    That could happen but it's going to cause a lot of headaches in claiming who is/was the legitimate power of the nation like what happened in Ukraine since Fat boy Kim is sure not going to call on PRC for rescue.
     
  4. SamuraiBlue
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    SamuraiBlue Captain

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    Doubt it seeing how things transpired in Ukraine.
     
  5. Phead128
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    Phead128 Junior Member

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    Nobody cares about Ukraine, that's why Russia got away with annexation of Crimea. Ukraine is a bad example of what the United Nations can do to a veto-wielding power.

    Libyan and Syrian civil war is an example of why Kim Jong Un would request PRC rescue, or else it leaves itself vulnerable to Western regime change during times of vulnerability.
     
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  6. SamuraiBlue
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    SamuraiBlue Captain

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    And that is why Russia is seeing a lot of sanctions placed against them.
    Try again?
     
  7. Equation
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    Equation Lieutenant General

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    That is because Russia does NOT have much of an economic impact world wide. China on the other hand is the second biggest (going on 1st soon) economy in the world. Try sanctioning China without hurting one self economically.
     
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  8. SamuraiBlue
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    SamuraiBlue Captain

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    Neither does PRC, anything that PRC can provide can be provided by others.
    Chew on that.
     
  9. Bltizo
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    Bltizo Moderator
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    Technically correct, but I think you're being a little bit naive to equate the willingness of other nations to impose trade sanctions on Russia vs the same willingness to impose sanctions on China.

    The ability to wage economic warfare is quite related to the degree of importance of the target nation both as an importer of one's own products vs being an exporter of goods -- in other words it is not merely about what China can export to other nations for their demands, but also what other nations wants to export to China for their own economic growth. In other words, by sanctioning China they're losing a major market for their own goods, and they'll have to weigh those losses in GDP.

    That can effectively be summed up by the place in which various nation ranks China in terms of their "most important" trading partners, and depending on where one looks, about 124 nations or territories consider China to be their most important trading partner (from 2012), not to mention China having taken the mantle of the world's largest trading nation about two years ago in 2014.
    I'm not sure how many nations counted Russia as their most important trade partner back in 2013 before the sanctions began in 2014, but I think it would be reasonable to assume that they would be far less.


    So it may well be possible for various nations around the world to try and place economic sanctions on China, but you are kidding yourself if you think it would be anywhere near as painless as placing sanctions on Russia. It would require substantially more political resolve as well as carry significant more economic damage to the nations doing the sanctioning as well due to the loss of China as an export market and Chinese economic retaliation.
     
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  10. vesicles
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    vesicles Major

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    It's not about exclusivity. No one has exclusive control of anything in the world. Even the most precious energy source crude oil is not exclusively in the Middle East. Many nations have huge amount of oil. Yet, Middle East is still holding huge strategic importance.

    It's about geopolitical and strategic importance of China. Huge amount of foreign investment in China. In addition to being one of the biggest exporters, China is also one of the biggest importers. China is now among the top 5 trading partners with almost every major powers in the world. China is now buying huge bulk of everything, including steel, metals, etc. Prices of gold, silver, copper, iron and other metals have gone through the roof largely because of China's demand. China's huge appetite for cars was what kept the big-3 in Detroit afloat. How about Luxury goods? How about tourism? What about Hollywood (China is now he second biggest market for Hollywood movies next to North America). Many countries in the world depend on China for business.

    Just imagine what happens when China is under some of economic sanction and can no longer buy these goods...
     
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