China's overland Silk Road and Maritime Silk Road Thread

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by SampanViking, Mar 29, 2015.

  1. Orthan
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    Orthan Junior Member

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    US, japan, india, australia are talking about launching an alternative to china´s belt and road initiative.

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-c...oad-alternative-report-idUKKCN1G20WL?rpc=401&

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...mulls-asia-infrastructure-plan-australia-says

    IMO the biggest question here is what will be the bill and who will pay for it. If this is an alternative, the US will have to foot the majority of it. After all that the trump administration said about "america first", will they be willing for it?
     
    #2451 Orthan, Feb 18, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
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  2. Equation
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    Equation Lieutenant General

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    Funny how the same group of gang of four (US, Japan, India and Australia) were once critical about how China's OBOR is a waste of money and investment and how it will not work. Oh the irony, now they will try to do the same, but without as much confidence and assurances as China.
     
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  3. supercat
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    supercat Junior Member

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    Out of the four, only India is actually located in Euroasia and can directly benefit from the Silk Road part of the project. However, unlike China, India lacks the expertise and capability for large scale construction projects overseas. In fact, she can barely satisfy her domestic demand.
     
  4. B.I.B.
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    B.I.B. Senior Member

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    Maybe its time for China to revisit the Kra canal project with Thailand.

    http://www.theindependent.sg/the-re...ruction-of-thais-kra-canal-financed-by-china/

    "
    By: 永久浪客/Forever Vagabond

    The Kra Canal or the Thai Canal refers to a proposal for a canal to cut through the southern isthmus of Thailand, connecting the Gulf of Thailand with the Andaman Sea. It would provide an alternative to transit through the Strait of Malacca and shorten transit for shipments of oil to East Asian countries like Japan and China by 1,200 km, saving much time. China refers to it as part of its 21st century maritime Silk Road.

    China is keen on the Kra Canal project partly for strategic reasons. Presently, 80% of China’s oil from the Middle East and Africa passes through the Straits of Malacca. China has long recognized that in a potential conflict with other rivals, particularly with the US, the Strait of Malacca could easily be blockaded, cutting-off its oil lifeline. Former Chinese President Hu Jintao even coined a term for this, calling it China’s “Malacca Dilemma”.

    History of Kra Canal

    The idea to shorten shipping time and distance through the proposed Kra Canal is not new. It was proposed as early as in 1677 when Thai King Narai asked the French engineer de Lamar to survey the possibility of building a waterway to connect Songkhla with Marid (now Myanmar), but the idea was discarded as impractical with the technology of that time.


    In 1793, the idea resurfaced. The younger brother of King Chakri suggested it would make it easier to protect the west coast with military ships. In the early 19th century, the British East India Company became interested in a canal. After Burma became a British colony in 1863, an exploration was undertaken with Victoria Point (Kawthaung) opposite the Kra estuary as its southernmost point, again with negative result. In 1882, the constructor of the Suez canal, Ferdinand de Lesseps, visited the area, but the Thai king did not allow him to investigate in detail.

    In 1897, Thailand and the British empire agreed not to build a canal so as to maintain the importance of Singapore as a shipping hub, since by that time, Singapore was already prospering as an international hub with great importance to the British.

    In the 20th century the idea resurfaced with various proposals to build the canal but did not go far due to various constraints including technology and cost constraints as well as indecisive political leadership of Thailand.

    China shows Thailand the money

    In the last decade, China has now become the potential game changer who can possibly turn Kra Canal proposal into reality in the 21st century. It has the money, technology and strong political leadership and will to support the project if it wants to.

    Last year, news emerged that China and Thailand have signed an MOU to advance the Kra Canal project. On 15 May 2015, the MOU was signed by the China-Thailand Kra Infrastructure Investment and Development company (中泰克拉基礎設施投資開發有限公司) and Asia Union Group in Guangzhou. According to the news reports, the Kra Canal project will take a decade to complete and incur a cost of US$28 billion.

    But 4 days later on 19 May, it was reported that both Chinese and Thai governments denied there was any official agreement between the 2 governments to build the canal.

    A statement by the Chinese embassy in Thailand said that China has not taken part in any study or cooperation on the matter. It later clarified that the organisations who signed the MOU have no links to the Chinese government. Separately, Xinhua news agency traced the announcement of the canal project to another Chinese firm Longhao, which declined comment when contacted.

    Dr Zhao Hong, an expert on China-Asean relations from the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, told the media that China would not embark on such a project lightly, given the political and bilateral implications.

    “China will have to consider the feedback from countries such as Singapore, which it has friendly ties with, given the impact that the Kra canal might have,” he said at the time ............."
     
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  5. vincent
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    vincent Senior Member

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    Completely pointless. Indian Andaman Islands are right on the other side
     
  6. supercat
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    supercat Junior Member

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    http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopo...ive-chinese-dam-project-open-review-pact-over
     
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  7. mr.bean
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    mr.bean Junior Member

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    Nothing is going to come out of this so called ''alternative''. it's just all talk and no action. if they were even remotely serious then why didn't anyone from this pathetic 'gang of 4' come out with this plan before China's OBOR. it's just knee jerk reaction to counter China's moves.
     
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  8. timepass
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    timepass Brigadier

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    Geopolitical Challenges of South Asia’s Silk Roads....

    [​IMG]

    This ambitious initiative aims to expand China’s mainland and maritime trade routes to the furthest corners of the world, solidify them in terms of tangible connective infrastructure projects that unleash its partners’ full economic potential, and ultimately use this new network as the basis for constructing multi polar institutions to complement, compete with, and then finally replace their existing uni polar counterparts.

    https://www.globalvillagespace.com/geopolitical-challenges-of-south-asias-silk-roads/
     
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  9. Dolcevita
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    Dolcevita Junior Member

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    BRI is not only about building ports, roads and railways.

    https://america.cgtn.com/2018/05/18/new-5000-km-highway-paves-way-for-more-china-russia-cooperation
    New 5,000 km highway paves way for more China-Russia cooperation
    [​IMG]
    Published May 18, 2018 at 10:37 PM
    Updated May 18, 2018 at 10:48 PM
    China and Russia have started trial runs on a highway that links China’s port city of Dalian with Russia’s third largest city of Novosibirsk. As CGTN’s Xu Xinchen reports.








    It’s Shi Junren’s second time driving to Russia. Over the span of five days, he will cover over 5,000 kilometers in his truck.

    “We will be moving local goods, such as fruit, from Dalian to Russia, and then move Russian goods back,” he said.

    Shi is among a select group of truck drivers that will be the first to use a new route linking China’s Dalian with Russia’s Novosibirsk.

    “The 5,500-kilometer road transport route goes through 20 Chinese and Russian cities and borders. The route links the Asia Pacific and Europe, and it could help integrate the Belt and Road Initiative with Russia’s Eurasian Economic Union,” Vice Minister of the Ministry of Transport Liu Xiaoming said.

    The Russian Ministry of Transport’s Alexei Dvoinykh agreeed.

    “The new route means that Russia and China have common views on the two countries’ cooperation,” he said. “The Russian people are looking forward to more goods from China – great opportunities for Chinese companies.”

    Trade volume between China and Russia stood at around $80 billion last year – but the plan is to more than double that amount by 2020. The new Dalian-Novosibirsk route is expected to help achieve that goal, but making it more time efficient is important.

    The new route implements the United Nations’ TIR system – which could cut custom clearance time up to 80 percent.

    “The goods will be inspected at the origin and only be inspected at the final destination,” Secretary General of the International Road Transport Union Umberto de Pretto said. “I mean, it could go through all the different borders without stopping the truck, without having to open the truck, because it is sealed at the origin and will only be inspected at the final destination. So it’s a huge facilitation advantage.”

    Once the first batch of trucks arrives, authorities will assess the trip and make adjustments, if needed, before the road is finally opened.

    The new route opens for doors for businesses, but there’s also a human element. Quicker trips mean these drivers can get back to their families that much earlier.
     
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  10. Dolcevita
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    Dolcevita Junior Member

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