China's Anti-Access ASBM Strategy [Defense News]

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by mxiong, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Lethe
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    Lethe Senior Member

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    Ah, a very simple explanation! :oops:
     
  2. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    You underestimate the power of cell phone camera and Weibo or Sina forum. Everybody own cell phone in China eve n the remote place like Mongolia. Once some one spotted the wreckage they take photo and posted it on Weibo for everybody to see.
    Military enthusiast will pick it and spread the news,

    It is second stage allright and No it doesn't have to be blown to pieces because the impact forces will be absorbed by the sand and the second pieces just broke See the first stage stuck in the sand and badly charred

    It is stages in a way because they don't collect and clean up the landing site .they don't try to hide it knowing it will be broadcast!

    DF26B.png
     
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  3. Equation
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    Equation Lieutenant General

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    Why are you wasting your time explaining logic to a deaf, blind, and in denial person who refuses to accept that China is advancing this much farther in man space program, rocketry, and HGV technology than Japan?;)o_O
     
  4. t2contra
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    t2contra Major

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    It is double-cab and this man is in the rear cab.
     
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  5. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    It is official the rocket force issue this statement

    MoD: PLARF conducted a new missile test launch in the Bohai Sea recently, which achieved the expected result.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. PanAsian
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    PanAsian Major

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    In full in English:
    http://english.chinamil.com.cn/view/2017-05/09/content_7594377.htm
    Obviously this and other PLA exercises in the area is related to THAAD deployment in SK as well as US, SK, Japan military exercises in the area.
     
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  7. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    A good article by Zachary Keck about surveillance system for ASBM
    Here is the link of Jeffrey Lin blog article about CH-T4 Very long endurance UAV. Potentially excellent platform for surveillance radar. Paired with quantum communication is it impossible to jam
    http://www.popsci.com/china-solar-powered-drone
    China Might Have a New Way to Sink U.S. Aircraft Carriers
    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/th...ew-way-sink-us-aircraft-carriers-21090?page=2
    Zachary Keck
    June 10, 2017

    The Pentagon just released its annual report on China’s military power, which once again highlighted Beijing’s efforts to put American aircraft carriers at risk. Right on cue, China announced a major milestone for a system that might be a key component of its antiaccess/area-denial (A2/AD) strategy.

    This week, Chinese state media reported that the Caihong-T 4 (CH-T4), China’s massive, solar-powered drone, for the first time flew at an altitude of twenty thousand meters. This is important because there are no clouds above twenty thousand meters, which allows solar-powered drones to operate for significantly longer periods of time.

    How long? Basically, indefinitely. According to China Daily, “future improvements will enable it to remain aloft several months or even several years.”

    Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer, who write the excellent Eastern Arsenal blog, note that the CH-T4 is an impressive combination of big and light. The drone’s wingspan is around 130 feet, which is wider than a Boeing 737. At the same time, the CH-T4 only weighs between 880 and 1,100 pounds. By way of comparison, Boeing 737’s lowest typical operating empty weight is over seventy thousand pounds, and its maximum gross takeoff weight can reach as high as 170,000 pounds. Besides being slender, the CH-T4’s lightness is due to its carbon fiber and plastic components.

    The drone can also travel at speeds of 125 miles per hour. However, it will also be able to cruise at sixty-five thousand feet, so it will be able to cover a huge swath of land without moving very far. Indeed, Lin and Singer point out: “It can utilize its high flight ceiling to maintain line-of-sight contact with over 400,000 square miles of ground and water. That's about the size of Egypt. For both militaries and tech firms, covering so much territory makes it an excellent data relay and communications node.”

    What Lin and Singer don’t mention is that these capabilities will make the CH-T4 an excellent asset in China’s quest to hold America’s aircraft carriers at risk in the Western Pacific. Much of the attention given to that effort focuses on China’s so-called “carrier-killer” missile, the DF-21D. But as I noted last week in relation to North Korea, the missile itself is only one piece of the puzzle. Even more important is the sophisticated “kill chain” of surveillance, radar and communications systems needed to track and provide updated targeting information to the antiship ballistic missile while it is in flight.

    Publicly available information indicates that America’s efforts to defeat China’s antiaccess/area-denial strategies focus on disrupting this “kill chain.” For example, in 2013, then chief of naval operations Jonathan Greenert and then Air Force chief of staff Gen. Mark Welsh coauthored an essay in Foreign Policy on how Air-Sea Battle intended to overcome A2/AD threats. In the article, they wrote that “Air-Sea Battle defeats threats to access by, first, disrupting an adversary’s command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems; second, destroying adversary weapons launchers (including aircraft, ships, and missile sites); and finally, defeating the weapons an adversary launches.”

    The logic of this approach, they argued, is that it “exploits the fact that, to attack our forces, an adversary must complete a sequence of actions, commonly referred to as a ‘kill chain.’ For example, surveillance systems locate U.S. forces, communications networks relay targeting information to weapons launchers, weapons are launched, and then they must hone in on U.S. forces. Each of these steps is vulnerable to interdiction or disruption, and because each step must work, our forces can focus on the weakest links in the chain, not each and every one.”

    Once it is operational, the CH-T4 will complicate these efforts by increasing the redundancies in China’s kill chain. For instance, if America is able to disrupt or destroy Chinese satellites, Beijing can rely on the drone to provide the information necessary to track American ships. The CH-T4 will have other comparable advantages over other surveillance systems. On the one hand, they will be cheaper and more flexible than satellites, while at the same time flying higher and farther away from the battlefield than different surveillance aircraft and ships. This combination will make it more difficult for Washington to destroy the surveillance step of the kill chain, although it could still focus on other steps such as disrupting the communication networks.

    None of this is news to the U.S. military. Although the Pentagon’s newest report on China’s military didn’t mention the CH-T4 by name, it did note that “the acquisition and development of longer-range unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) will increase China’s ability to conduct long-range ISR and strike operations.”

    Fortunately, the U.S. military will have some time to figure out its response, as China Daily reports that it will “take several years for designers and engineers to improve and test the aircraft before it is delivered to users.” If the United States’ own record at developing this type of technology is any guide, Beijing should expect a few more hiccups along the way. NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) began working on the Helios Prototype well over a decade ago. In 2001, it completed an important milestone by flying at an altitude of ninety-six thousand feet (29,260 meters). Yet a Helios crashed during a flight test just two years later. Europe, meanwhile, is also trying to develop so-called pseudo satellites.

    Zachary Keck is the former managing editor of The National Interest. You can find him on Twitter: @ZacharyKeck.

    The "Caihong-T 4" (CH-T4), built by the Chinese Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics (CAAA), has a double-bodied fuselage, cranked wing, and twin tail. It's got a wingspan of 40 meters—or about 130 feet, which means its wider than a Boeing 737 jetliner. Despite the large size, it weighs between 880 and 1,100 pounds. It owes its this lightness to its carbon fiber and plastic components.


    [​IMG]
    NEAR SPACE

    The CH-T4, flying 12 miles up into the atmosphere, has line-of-sight radio and visual coverage over 400,000 square miles—an area the size of Egypt.

    China Daily
     
    #67 Hendrik_2000, Jun 11, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2017
  8. Equation
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    Equation Lieutenant General

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    Yeah but China's Quantum technology and communication are getting better therefore makes this disruption almost obsolete.
     
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  9. B.I.B.
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    B.I.B. Senior Member

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    I do not understand.Why tell everyone what you are doing.
    Did the Brits announce to the world that they were working on radar and demonstate in theory what the advantages of having it were before WW2 was declared?
     
  10. manqiangrexue
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    manqiangrexue Captain

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    I think these were conclusions drown by the Pentagon, not leaks by the Chinese. They saw (maybe via satellite) China flying a drone at 20,000M with solar panels on it and they kinda put 2 and 2 together and figured it would be pretty handy at generating targeting data on ships.
     
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