China Ballistic Missiles and Nuclear Arms Thread

Discussion in 'Strategic Defense' started by peace_lover, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. by78
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    by78 Brigadier

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    DF-26.

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  2. by78
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    by78 Brigadier

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    DF-21D firing. Cross-posting them here.

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  3. AndrewS
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    AndrewS Captain
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    The question was just on the cost of the missile.

    Otherwise we're getting into the Total Cost of Ownership.

    When I previously looked at the TEL cost, I came up with a figure of approx $1M. That's negligible compared with a missile cost of $30M+ for a DF-41.
    The warhead cost is the big unknown, but my gut also tells me that it isn't too high.
     
  4. AndrewS
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    AndrewS Captain
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    I don't think the DF-31 or DF-41 have reloads.
    Because if they did have to be fired, they could expect incoming counterbattery nukes which makes a second launch impossible.

    Plus if you have TEL cost of $1M versus $30M for a missile + ? warhead costs, it simply doesn't make sense to skimp on the number of TELs.
     
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  5. taxiya
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    taxiya Major
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    There is a book "High speed long range precision strike flying craft design method and application" published by "National Defense Industry Press" in 2014.

    There are multiple configurations, including "boost and glider"
    In chapter "Glider reentry characteristics and application", it says:
    • The warhead is kinetic, no explosive.
    • The warhead's operational requirement is:
      • minimum terminal impact speed: 2000m/s
      • release altitude being researched: xx00m/s to xx00m/s
      • impact angle: -89 degrees (the glider's initial flying vector being 0 degree), this is almost vertical to the target.
      • accuracy within 10 meters.
    • The glider carries the warhead and release it at xx km altitude xx km distant (horizontal implied by the number) to the target.
    This may be related to DF-17.

    In chapter dedicated to "ballistic reentry precision strike craft", it says that this kind of craft can be controlled and maneuvered with a smaller maneuvering range.
    This may be related to DF-21D and DF-26.

    All these crafts are terminal guided. The book's most volume is dedicated to the design and simulation of the control algorithm and optimizing the flying profile such as the booster cut-off timing, altitude, speed and warhead releasing timing, angle etc. all of them have great impact to the control algorithm and accuracy.
     
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  6. shanlung
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    shanlung New Member
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    OK.
    But still enough throw weight of nukes even without reloads to make 'Muricans back off.
    And if they do not, and fired that nuke once their carriers are turned into burning hulks , they be turned into seas and lakes of molten multicolored glass.

    And tardigrades will be the final remaining sentiences after the rats and cockroaches die off as well.
     
  7. Tam
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    Tam Captain
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    Via LKJ86 at the PDF. Via @钢铁机机 from Weibo


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  8. enroger
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    enroger New Member
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    That seems like an overly complicated launch... I mean why one big booster and 4 small boosters? Why bother with ejectable nose cone? That said I have no better alternatives...
     
  9. azretonov
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    azretonov New Member
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    What's with this "the most this and that" talk? But if you insist on this "the most" part, the Russian R-36M2 is no doubt, the record holder here as its almost twice as heavy as DF-41 with an enormous payload capacity and 16,000 km range, which makes it the king of the ICBMs at the moment. RS-28 might challenge its position in future though.

    There is no such thing as re-loading a road-mobile ICBM. It's against the principle and practice since the TEL has to evade any kind of infrastructure in times of conflict in order to avoid enemy recce assets. I suggest you watch the Russian practices with their RS-12M & RS-24. This way, you can better understand why reloading isn't an option. Not to mention to how narrow is the launch envelope. Plus, making a TEL is the easiest and the cheapest part while deploying those warheads is the real money taker.

    Nope, it doesn't. Check the NEW START Treaty numbers.
     
  10. shanlung
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    shanlung New Member
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    You wrong.

    Dont take my word.

    Russia’s RS-28 “Sarmat” ten-ton payload liquid-fueled intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) will be the world’s largest nuclear strike missile when it enters production, as early as 2021. Reportedly it may carry up to fifteen 350 kiloton warheads, or up to twenty-four of the new “Avangard” nuclear-armed Hypersonic Glide Vehicle (HGV) warheads.

    But since mid–2017, Chinese sources have revealed details of an even larger twenty-ton payload solid-fuel space-launch vehicle (SLV) that could form the basis for what might become the world’s largest “mobile” ICBM.

    In May 2017, the now closed Chinese website ChinaSpaceFlight.com offered the first depiction of the family of solid-fuel SLVs to be offered by the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC). Seen in this image for the first time was the twenty-ton payload Kuaizhou-21, or KZ-21, and the KZ-21A, which adds two side boosters.


    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/next-china-military-threat-worlds-biggest-mobile-icbm-40952
     
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