Canadian Military Photos

Discussion in 'World Military Pictures' started by Nem116, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. TerraN_EmpirE
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    TerraN_EmpirE Tyrant King

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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

    I didn't know Popeye had Relatives in Canada... there is quite the family resemblance.

    Note the "Darth Vader" mask, now in issue both Us Army and Canadian (It seems) Air crews officially called the Maxillofacial Shield it protects the flight engineers from debris kicked up by the rotor, dust and light small arms. And looks BAD! the sights used on the M3 and M134 are Actually not sights but rather a Anpeq2 laser pointer.
    also note IR green Canadian Flag
     
    #11 TerraN_EmpirE, Jun 25, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  2. Nem116
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    Nem116 Junior Member

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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

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  3. Nem116
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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

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  4. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

    Rapid Trident 2011

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    A Ukrainian Officer from the 80th Airmobile Regiment instructs Master Corporal Stéphane Lafrance, Paratrooper from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, during in-flight procedure training on the Ukrainian Basic Parachute Training Course in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    Corporal Steven Paquette prepares to jump off the MI-8 Helicopter mock-up simulator during the Ukrainian Basic Parachute Training Course in Lviv, Ukraine. Cpl Paquette is a Paratrooper from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier Garrison


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    Canadian Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, practice landing techniques from a five foot platform during the Ukrainian Basic Parachute Training Course in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    Lieutenant Jacob Porter, Paratrooper from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, practices landing techniques from a five foot platform during the Ukrainian Basic Parachute Training Course in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    Ukrainian instructors from the 80th Airmobile Regiment explain Ukrainian in-flight procedures to Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment.


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    A Ukrainian Captain and instructor from the 80th Airmobile Regiment performs overall safety checks on Master Corporal Pierre-Olivier Brochu, Paratrooper from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment before doing the MI-8 Helicopter mock-up parachute simulator in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, verify each other’s parachute systems before training with the Ukrainian 80th Airmobile Regiment in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, line up prior to training with the Ukrainian 80th Airmobile Regiment in Lviv, Ukraine.


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    A Ukrainian Major and instructor from the 80th Airmobile Regiment checks over Captain Robert Colbourne’s parachute harness with assistance from Major Marc-André Gélinas. Captain Colbourne and Major Gélinas are Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier Garrison.


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    A Ukrainian Senior Sergeant and instructor from the 80th Airmobile Regiment, checks over the parachute harness of Corporal Sébastian Caron, Parachute Rigger from Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre, Canadian Forces Base Trenton.


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    Corporal Steve Gamache and Cpl Stéphane Pelletier make adjustments to their parachute harness before training on the MI-8 Helicopter mock-up simulator during the Ukrainian Basic Parachute Training Course in Lviv, Ukraine. Corporal Gamache and Corporal Pelletier are Paratroopers from 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier Garrison.


     
  5. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

    The PPF course is run by CFLAWC, located at CFB Trenton, ON. The aim of the PPF course is to enable Pathfinder personnel to execute insertion/extraction techniques by air, land, and sea in the context of adaptive dispersed operations in hostile environments; to enable personnel to perform the tactical marking and securing of a Drop Zone (DZ), Landing Zone (LZ), and Beach Heads, as well as Airstrips used for Tactical Airlift Operation for followon forces; and to enable qualified Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs) and officers to plan, coordinate, conduct, and advise commanders on PPF Operations.

    CFLAWC delivers basic and advanced training in such subjects as Mountain and Jungle Operations, Aerial Delivery, Helicopter Operations, Rigger, Round and Square Parachuting, Military Freefall, DZ/LZ Controller, and Basic Winter Warfare. [​IMG]

    Candidates of the Patrol Pathfinder (PPF) Course, Session 13, disembark from a CH-146 Griffon helicopter in the training area of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden in Ontario, Canada on 28 July 2011. Session 13, which is headed by course director Captain (Capt) Mover of Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre (CFLAWC), began on 16 May 2011 with 17 candidates, and is 60 training days long.


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    A candidate of the Patrol Pathfinder (PPF) Course, Session 13, relaxes after the instructors call End Exercise (End Ex) during a Field Training Exercise (FTX) in the training area of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden in Ontario, Canada on 28 July 2011. Session 13, which is headed by course director Captain (Capt) Mover of Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre (CFLAWC), began on 16 May 2011 with 17 candidates, and is 60 training days long.


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    A candidate of the Patrol Pathfinder (PPF) Course, Session 13, takes up a fire position and conducts security after disembarking from a CH-146 Griffon helicopter in the training area of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden in Ontario, Canada on 28 July 2011. Session 13, which is headed by course director Captain (Capt) Mover of Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre (CFLAWC), began on 16 May 2011 with 17 candidates, and is 60 training days long.


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    A candidate of the Patrol Pathfinder (PPF) Course, Session 13, conducts a navigation (nav) check after disembarking from a CH-146 Griffon helicopter in the training area of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden in Ontario, Canada on 28 July 2011. Session 13, which is headed by course director Captain (Capt) Mover of Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre (CFLAWC), began on 16 May 2011 with 17 candidates, and is 60 training days long.


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    A candidate of the Patrol Pathfinder (PPF) Course, Session 13, patrols the last few meters before the instructors call End Exercise (End Ex) during a Field Training Exercise (FTX) in the training area of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden in Ontario, Canada on 28 July 2011. Session 13, which is headed by course director Captain (Capt) Mover of Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre (CFLAWC), began on 16 May 2011 with 17 candidates, and is 60 training days long.
     
  6. Nem116
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    Nem116 Junior Member

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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

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  7. bd popeye
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    bd popeye The Last Jedi
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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

    Canada - Operation NANOOK 11

    Operation NANOOK 11 is the centerpiece of three major sovereignty operations conducted annually by the Canadian Forces in Canada’s North. Exercising Canada’s Arctic sovereignty is a priority area of Canada’s Northern Strategy and such operations enable the Canadian Forces to demonstrate its ability to operate effectively in the challenging environment of Canada’s North.


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    Private Luke Johnston of Harvey Station New Brunswick and Private Kevin Fearn of Fredericton NB, both soldiers from the 1st Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment, conduct a live fire range on Cornwallis Island during Operation NANOOK 11.


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    Private Nathan MacGilliurag, a Fredericton based reservist with the 1st, Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment fires on a range on Cornwallis Island during Operation NANOOK 11.


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    Corporal Mike MacDonald, a Saint John based reservist with the 1st Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment conducts a live fire range on Cornwallis Island during Operation NANOOK 11


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    Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment conduct a live fire range on Cornwallis Island during Operation NANOOK 11


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    Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment set up a live fire range on Cornwallis Island during Operation NANOOK 11.


     
  8. Nem116
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    Nem116 Junior Member

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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

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  9. Nem116
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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

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  10. TerraN_EmpirE
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    TerraN_EmpirE Tyrant King

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    Re: Canadian Forces Photos

    Note the Use of a Suppressor on the sniper rifle, More and more in armies actively engaged in conflicts of Afghanistan and the GWOT. Gear once considered only for "ninja" Counter terror and covert ops units is finding it's way too the regular war fighters. In the sniper realm The Suppressor adds a reduction in the acoustic and visual signatures of firing as well as a few other advantages. For example by a unique effect the sound of suppressed weapons fire actually is misleading in that often those on the receiving end will think they hear it in the opposite direction of actual firing, There is in modern western suppressors a slight amount of added muzzle velocity.
    Training with a suppressor is essential in forces issuing them widely.
    All suppressors change the weight, balance, length and point of aim, point of impact of there host weapons. they also demand specialized care that must be trained and drilled like any other weapons care.
     
    #20 TerraN_EmpirE, Oct 4, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2011
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