Canadian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.

Discussion in 'World Armed Forces' started by rommel, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. rommel
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    Hi, there's a thread about the Canadian Army. Enjoy it.

    Part One: Canadian Army in Facts and the Canadian Army Structure

    Size of the Army
    Approximate strength of Army (Regular Force): 19, 500
    Approximate strength of Army (Reserve Force): 15, 500
    Approximate number of civilians employed by the Army: 4, 200

    Employment Equity
    Number of women in the Army: 1, 781
    Number of women in the Combat Arms
    (Infantry, Armoured, Artillery, Engineers) 252

    Deployments (I don't have the numbe for 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005)
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 2001: 3, 281
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 2000: 3, 831
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1999: 5, 599
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1998: 3, 470
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1997: 3, 881
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1996: 3, 818
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1995: 2, 615
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1994: 4, 586
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1993: 5, 949
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1992: 4, 834
    Number of Army personnel deployed on overseas missions in 1991: 534


    Major Vehicles and Equipment:
    Tanks and Armoured Vehicles
    651 LAV IIIs
    203 Coyote Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicles
    114 Leopard C2 Tanks
    74 Bison Ambulances
    60 Bison Mortar vehicles
    35 Bison Recovery vehicles
    16 Bison Mobile Repair Team vehicles
    14 Bison Electronic Warfare vehicles
    341 M113 A3 / MTVL tracked vehicle variants
    9 Badger engineer vehicles
    8 Taurus armoured recovery vehicles
    9 Beaver bridge-layers
    52 AVGP Personnel Carriers
    80 AVGP Command Posts
    10 AVGP Radio Relay vehicles
    20 AVGP Unit Access Node vehicles
    70 AVGP Mobile Repair Team vehicles

    Artillery
    96 C3 Towed Howitzers 105mm
    76 M-109 Self-Propelled Howitzers
    28 LG1 Mark II 105 Towed Howitzers
    18 AVGP Artillery Gun Tractors

    Air Defence
    20 *** 005 Twin 35mm Air Defence Guns
    34 Air Defence Anti-Tank Systems (ADATS)
    10 Oerlikon Skyguard Mark II
    24 AVGP Very Short Air Defence vehicles

    Support Vehicles
    99 Griffon Helicopters
    1,212 HLVWs (Heavy Logistic Vehicle Wheeled)
    2,500 Iltis jeeps
    2,879 LSVWs (Light Support Vehicle Wheeled)
    2,769 MLVW (Medium Logistic Vehicle Wheeled)
    78 BV 206 all-terrain vehicles

    Structure

    Army Regular Land Forces
    Land Force Command has a regional military structure based upon 4 geographical areas. These areas (Western, Central, Quebec and Atlantic) provide a single chain of command for regular and reserve forces in their regions. Land Force Headquarters (LFHQ) is collocated with NDHQ in Ottawa. The Land Force Doctrine and Training System forms an integral part of LFHQ, but is located in Kingston, Ontario. This HQ controls all of individual and collective training activities for the Land Force.

    The Land Force is organized into 3 Mechanized Brigade Groups stationed in Western Canada, Ontario and Quebec, respectively. Each group has 3 infantry battalions (2 mechanized, 1 light), 1 armoured regiment, 1 artillery regiment, 1 combat engineer regiment, 1 reconnaissance squadron, plus appropriate combat support and combat service support. Outside this structure remain 1 engineer support regiment, 1 air defence regiment, and 1 electronic warfare squadron.

    Army Reserve
    The Army Reserves are growing and are already incorporating unique capabilities such as Civil Military Cooperation (CIMIC) and Psychological Operations (PSYOPS) into their structure.

    The Reserve component of the Land Force is organized in ten Brigade Groups that in total are comprised of 17 reconnaissance units, 17 artillery units, 12 engineer units, 51 infantry battalions, 19 logistic units, 4 military police units, and 4 intelligence units.

    Canadian Rangers
    The Canadian Rangers (164 patrols) who serve in Canada’s Far North, are also members of the Army Reserve.

    Major army bases
    Edmonton, Alberta; Suffield, Alberta; Shilo, Manitoba; Petawawa, Ontario; Kingston, Ontario; Montreal, Quebec; Valcartier, Quebec; Gagetown, New Brunswick.
     
    #1 rommel, Oct 5, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 20, 2014
  2. BrotherofSnake
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    Those ADATS are so cool. Have they ever been in combat before?
     
  3. tphuang
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    we have even less troops than I thought.
     
  4. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    you though how many do we have ???

    Brotherofsnake,yes the ADATS were in a few major deployement like Kosovo and Bosnia since we acquire them in 1989.
     
  5. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    Part II, Canadian Army Unit[/B]

    Regular Unit


    Canadian Force Base Petawawa
    Land Force Central Area HQ
    Land Force Central Area Training Centre (Meaford)

    2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade Groupe
    1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
    2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group HQ
    2 Combat Engineer Regiment
    2 Field Ambulance
    2 Military Police Platoon
    2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
    2 Service Battalion
    3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
    Royal Canadian Dragoons
    2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
    4 Air Defence Regiment
    4 Engineer Support Regiment
    Canadian Force Base Gagetown
    Land Force Atlantic Area HQ
    Canadian Force Base Valcartier
    Land Force Quebec Area HQ

    5e Groupe Brigade Mechanize du Canada (The only french-canadian unit, the 5th mechanised Brigade group of Canada
    12e Régiment Blindé du Canada (12th Armor Regiment)
    1st Battalion, The Royal 22e Regimént
    2nd Battalion, The Royal 22e Régiment
    3rd Battalion, The Royal 22e Régiment
    5 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group HQ
    5 Combat Engineer Regiment
    5 Field Ambulance
    5 Military Police Platoon
    5 Régiment d'artillerie légere du Canada (5th Light Artillery battalion)
    5 Service Battalion


    1 CMBG
    1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group HQ
    1 Combat Engineer Regiment
    1 Field Ambulance
    1 Military Police Platoon
    1 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
    1 Service Battalion
    1st Battalion, The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
    2nd Battalion, The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
    3rd Battalion, The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
    Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians)
    Canadian Forces Base Shilo
    Canadian Forces Base Suffield
    Edmonton Garrison
    Land Force Western Area Training Centre (Wainwright)
    1 Area Support Group
    Area Support Group Calgary


    Reserve Unit

    1 Air Defence Regiment
    10 Field Artillery Regiment
    10 Field Engineer Squadron
    11 Field Artillery Regiment
    11 Medical Company
    11 Service Battalion
    116 Independent Field Battery
    12 Medical Company
    12 Service Battalion
    12e Régiment Blindé du Canada (Milice) (there's also a reserve part to the 12th Armor)
    14 Service Battalion
    15 Field Artillery Regiment
    15 Field Artillery Regiment Band
    15 Medical Company
    15 Service Battalion
    16 Medical Company
    16 Service Battalion
    17 Medical Company
    17 Service Battalion
    18 Air Defence Regiment
    18 Medical Company
    18 Service Battalion
    1st Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders
    1st Battalion, The Royal New-Brunswick Regiment
    1st Battalion, The Royal Newfoundland Regiment
    1st Hussars
    2 Battalion, The Irish Regiment of Canada
    2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group HQ
    2 Combat Engineer Regiment
    2 Field Ambulance
    2 Field Artillery Regiment
    2 Field Engineer Regiment
    2 Intelligence Company
    2 Intelligence Platoon
    2 Military Police Platoon
    2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
    2 Service Battalion
    20 Field Artillery Regiment
    21 Service Battalion
    22 Service Battalion
    23 Medical Company
    23 Service Battalion
    25 Medical Company
    25 Military Police Platoon
    25 Service Battalion
    26 Field Artillery Regiment
    26 Service Battalion
    28 Medical Company
    28 Service Battalion
    2nd Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders
    2nd Battalion, The Royal New-Brunswick Regiment
    2nd Battalion, The Royal Newfoundland Regiment
    3 Field Artillery Regiment
    3 Field Engineer Regiment
    3 Field Engineer Squadron
    3 Intelligence Company
    30 Dental Platoon
    30 Field Artillery Regiment
    30 Military Police Platoon
    31 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    31 Combat Field Engineer Regiment
    31 Service Battalion
    32 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    33 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    33 Field Engineer Squadron
    33 Medical Platoon
    33 Service Battalion
    34 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    35 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    35 Medical Company
    35 Service Battalion
    36 Canadian Brigade Group Band
    36 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    36 Service Battalion
    37 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    38 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    39 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group
    4 Intelligence Company
    41 Canadian Brigade Group HQ
    44 Field Engineer Squadron
    45 Field Engineer Squadron
    48th Highlanders of Canada
    49 Field Artillery Regiment
    4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
    51 Service Battalion
    52 Medical Company
    55 Medical Company
    55 Service Battalion
    56 Field Artillery Regiment
    56 Field Engineer Squadron
    58 Air Defence Battery
    6 Field Artillery Regiment
    6 Field Engineer Squadron
    6 Intelligence Company
    62 Field Artillery Regiment
    6th Battalion, The Royal 22e Régiment
    7 Toronto Regiment
    8 Field Engineer Regiment
    84 Independent Field Battery
    8th Canadian Hussars
    9 Field Engineer Squadron
    Area Support Group Calgary
    Black Watch
    British Columbia Dragoons
    British Columbia Regiment
    Calgary Highlanders
    Canadian Grenadier Guards
    Canadian Rangers
    Canadian Scottish Regiment
    Ceremonial Guards
    Directorate of Land Strategic Concepts
    Fort Garry Horse
    Governor General's Foot Guards
    Governor General's Horse Guards
    Infantry School
    King's Own Calgary Regiment
    Lake Superior Scottish Regiment
    Le Régiment de Hull
    Le Régiment de la Chaudière
    Le Régiment de Maisonneuve
    Le Régiment du Saguenay
    Les Fusiliers de Sherbrooke
    Les Fusiliers du St-Laurent
    Les Fusilliers Mont-Royal (that's my unit !!)
    Lorne Scots
    Loyal Edmonton Regiment
    Militia Command and Staff Course
    NATO Training Simulation Work Group
    North Saskatchewan Regiment
    Peace Support Training Centre
    Prince Edward Island Regiment
    Princess Louise Fusiliers
    Rocky Mountain Rangers
    Royal Canadian Hussars
    Royal Regina Rifles
    Royal Westminster Regiment
    Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    Saskatchewan Dragoons
    Seaforth Highlanders of Canada
    Sherbrooke Hussars
    SkyHawks
    South Alberta Light Horse
    Stormont, Dundas Glengarry Highlanders
    The Algonquin Regiment
    The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada
    The Brockville Rifles
    The Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment
    The Grey and Simcoe Forresters
    The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment
    The Highland Fusiliers of Canada
    The Lincoln and Welland Regiment
    The Ontario Regiment
    The Princess of Wales Own Regiment
    The Queens own Cameron Highlanders of Canada
    The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
    The Queen's York Rangers
    The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry
    The Royal Montreal Regiment
    The Toronto Scottish Regiment
    The Windsor Regiment
    Voltigeurs de Quebéc
    West Nova Scotia Regiment
     
  6. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    Part IV: Canadian Army Weapon, Equipment and Gears.

    For this part, i'll post one equipment or weapon each 1 or 2 day.

    Today, the Canadian C7A1 5.56mm Rifle of Diemaco
    [​IMG]

    The C7A1 Assault Rifle

    The C7A1 assault rifle is an improved version of the basic C7 combat rifle, incorporating a low-mounted optical sight. It is a Canadian adaptation of a U.S. firearm known as the M16A1E1. The C7A1 eliminates the carrying handle of the C7 and substitutes an optical sight. The weapon is equipped with a 3.5x optical sight, which is mounted in place of the carrying handle.

    C7A1 rounds are 5.56 x 45 NATO standard. The weapon has an effective range of 400 metres and a rate of fire of 700 to 940 rounds per minute. Along with the optical sight, optional attachments include the M203A1 40mm grenade launcher, the AN PAQ 4 Laser pointer and the Image Intensification Night Sight (Kite sight). It has been in service with the Army since 1986.

    Armament:
    Cartridge: 5.56mm x 45mm NATO
    Rate of Fire: cyclic, 700 to 940 rounds per minute
    Magazine: 30 rounds

    Specifications:
    Weight: empty - 3.3kg, full - 3.9kg (not including M203A1 grenade launcher)
    Length: normal butt, 1.0 m
    Barrel Length: 530
    Operation: direct gas operated, air cooled, magazine fed
    Range: 400 m
    Entered service : 1986

    Personnaly, I love this weapon so much, a great one, better than the US M16A2 and soon, we'll be maybe equiped with the newer C7A2. A good thing is that weapon is ambidextrous (I'm a left-handed) without any modification.
     
  7. MIGleader
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    i heard on the history channel that canada had a new, large looking rifle in development. it was supposed to fire "smart gernades" and have electronic fuinctions. any info?
     
  8. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    No, I'm so sorry, the only new equipement that I know about and that we acquire recently are the new G-Wagen and our new NVG for the Air Force.
     
  9. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    [​IMG]

    Coyote Reconnaissance Vehicle

    The Coyote is a vital component of the army’s leading-edge battlefield systems. This highly mobile, well-armed and well-protected reconnaissance variant of the Light Armoured Vehicle family is employed in the conduct of battlefield reconnaissance and surveillance missions at the battlegroup and brigade levels. Incorporating both radar and a variety of electro-optic sensors, the Coyote surveillance system provides an all-weather, day and night observation capability. The Coyote is in use with the Army’s six mechanized infantry battalions, the three armour regiments and their respective schools.

    The most innovative aspect of the Coyote is its surveillance system, designed to detect hostile forces using a combination of day camera, radar, thermal imaging, and laser range-finding equipment.

    Designed to operate in the world's hot spots, the Coyote is armed and armoured to fulfil its mission. The ballistic-steel hull protects against small-arms fire, mines and high-explosive airbursts. Add-on armour protects against larger projectiles. The two-man electric-drive turret is equipped with a laser-warning receiver. A fully stabilized 25-mm chain gun provides light assault firepower. On roads the vehicle's maximum speed is 100 km/h, with a maximum range of 660 km. It can deploy quickly to an area accessible by roads or trails, and then continue cross-country. A mast-equipped version of the vehicle raises its surveillance gear 10 m above the ground to see hostile forces over obstacles and from protected positions.

    Armament:
    25-mm stabilized M242 chain gun
    7.62-mm stabilized coaxial machine gun
    7.62-mm top-turret mounted machine gun
    76-mm grenade launcher (2 clusters of 4 launchers)
    7.62-mm C6 machine gun

    Specifications:
    Length: 6.39 m
    Width: 2.50 m
    Height: 2.69 m
    Maximum speed: 100 km/hr
    Range: 660 km
    Weight: 14.4 t
    Gradient: maximum 60%
    Side slope: maximum 30%
    Trench crossing: 2.06 m
    Fording: 1.3 m max
    Sights: Daytime optical, Thermal Imagery (TI), Generation III Image Intensification (II)
    Surveillance System: Battlefield Surveillance Radar, Thermal Imager, Daylight camera, and Laser Range-finder
    Winch: Front-mounted 6,800 kg dynamic pull self-recovery winch
    Engine: 275 hp Detroit Diesel 6V53T
    Transmission: 5 forward gears, 1 reverse
    Transfer case: 2 speed
    Suspension: Independent rear 4 wheels torsion bar, Front 4 wheels strut
    Wheels: 8 wheels (4 or 8 wheel drive)
    Tires: Michelin XML
    Brakes: Power (air)
    Entered service: 1996
    Number in service: 203

    This vehicule is the proud of the Canadian Army since there's no equivalent in other armies.
     
    #9 rommel, Oct 6, 2005
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2005
  10. rommel
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    Re: Canadian Armed Force - Land

    M72 LAW
    [​IMG]

    M72 Light Anti-Armour Weapon

    The M72 is a light, anti-armour weapon that can be used by a single soldier to destroy enemy combat vehicles and fortifications. The 66-mm warhead can penetrate up to 350 mm of armour. The unit is light and compact and can easily be carried by an individual soldier. When required, the user extends the telescopic tube, which automatically cocks the launcher and raises the sight. The user places the tube on his shoulder, aims, and squeezes the trigger to discharge the rocket to a range of up to 350m. The maximum effective range is about 220m against moving targets and 300m against stationary targets.

    Although primarily designed for the defeat of light armour, the weapon retains a moderate capability against older tanks when engaging them at the sides or rear.

    The tactical round consists of a free-flight rocket in a disposable telescopic launcher. Each rocket consists of three major assemblies: a 66mm high explosive warhead; a Point-Initiating, Base Detonating (PIBD) fuse and an improved rocket motor. Attached to the motor case are eight spring-loaded fins which are folded forward to lie alongside the rocket motor whilst in the launcher. Upon ignition of the rocket, gas pressure propels the rocket from the launcher and the fins spring out to stabilize flight.

    Armament:
    Calibre: 66mm rocket

    Specifications:
    Carry Weight: 3.45 kg
    Carry Length: 780 mm
    Firing Length: 980 mm
    Muzzle Velocity: 200 m/s
    Effective Range: 220 m
    Maximum Range: 350 m
    Time of flight to 250m: 1.4 seconds
    Penetration: 300 mm of armour


    Krupp Crane KMK 2025
    [​IMG]

    The Krupp Crane is used to lift heavy objects such as bridging materials, sea containers, and cargo. It is also employed to load cargo onto transport trucks. The vehicle has two cabs, one for the driver and another for the operator. It is normally crewed by only one person however, as the crane cannot drive and operate at the same time. The KMK 2025 has a lifting capacity of 25 tonnes, and is equipped with four-wheel drive and four-wheel steering.

    Specifications:
    Length: 9.75 m
    Width: 2.49 m
    Width with outriggers: 5.5 m
    Height: 3.29 m (crane down)
    Lifting Capacity: 25 t
    Engine: Mercedes-Benz, 204 HP
    Gears: 6 forward gears, 3 reverse
    Minimum Boom Length: 7.4 m
    Maximum Boom Length: 23 m (36 m with the addition of a 13 m boom extension)
    Cable Length: 50 m
    Cable Gage: 16 mm
    Crew: 1


    Eryx AT Missile System

    [​IMG]
    ERYX

    Eryx is the army’s Short Range Anti-Armour Weapon (Heavy) or SRRAW (H). It is a portable system consisting of a firing post, which includes a day sight and thermal imager, a tripod, and the missile in a disposable launch tube. The Eryx is normally fired from a light weight tripod but can be fired with the missile launch shoulder resting on the soldier’s shoulder.

    The Eryx is operated by a two person crew, a gunner assisted by a loader. The Eryx provides the infantry section and the armoured reconnaissance assault troop with deadly accuracy and lethality to a 600 metre range. With its tandem high explosive shaped charge warhead, the Eryx can defeat the armour of all known tanks, including those protected by explosive reactive armour. It is also effective against fortified positions including bunkers, reinforced buildings and other earthworks.

    The Mirabel Thermal Imaging sight allows the Eryx to operate under all weather and light conditions. The soft launch feature of the missile gives the system the flexibility to be fired in open ground, wooded areas and even from small rooms in buildings. The missile system can be carried by two soldiers or transported in any of the military’s vehicles.

    Training on the Eryx is conducted with the aid of computerized interactive simulators. The Eryx Video Interactive Gunnery System (EVIGS) is used to conduct the initial indoor simulated missile firing and the outdoor training is conducted with real vehicles as targets using the Eryx Precision Gunnery System (EPGS).

    Armament:
    Missiles: Eryx tandem warhead HEAT
    Propulsion: 2 stage, solid propellant rocket motor
    Penetration: ERA + 900 millimetres of armour
    Rate of fire: 5 rounds in two minutes

    Specifications:
    Length: 1.13 metres (missile in case)
    Range: 50 to 600 metres
    Crew: 2 (gunner and loader)
    Entered Service: 1996
     
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